01 Seminar Of Jacques Lacan

by Jacques Lacan

WW Norton | January 1, 1991 | Trade Paperback |

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'The Seminar: Books I and II have a special place because of their value as an introduction to Lacan...[They] are a sure path of entry into Lacan's critique of ego psychology....Lacan's work underscores that part of Freud's message that is most revolutionary for our time. The individual is 'decentred'. There is no autonomous self. What sex was to the Victorians, the question of free will is to our new Fin-de-Siecle.' --Sherry Turkle, 'London Review of Books'

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 328 Pages, 8.66 × 6.3 × 0.39 in

Published: January 1, 1991

Publisher: WW Norton

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0393306976

ISBN - 13: 9780393306972

Found in: Health and Well Being, Reference

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01 Seminar Of Jacques Lacan

01 Seminar Of Jacques Lacan

by Jacques Lacan

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 328 Pages, 8.66 × 6.3 × 0.39 in

Published: January 1, 1991

Publisher: WW Norton

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0393306976

ISBN - 13: 9780393306972

About the Book

A complete translation of the seminar that Jacques Lacan gave in the course of a year's teaching within the training programme of the Socie'te' Francaise de Psychanalyse. The French text was prepared by Jacques-Alain Miller in consultation with Jacques Lacan, from the transcriptions of the seminar.

From the Publisher

'The Seminar: Books I and II have a special place because of their value as an introduction to Lacan...[They] are a sure path of entry into Lacan's critique of ego psychology....Lacan's work underscores that part of Freud's message that is most revolutionary for our time. The individual is 'decentred'. There is no autonomous self. What sex was to the Victorians, the question of free will is to our new Fin-de-Siecle.' --Sherry Turkle, 'London Review of Books'

From the Jacket

''The Seminar: Books I and II have a special place because of their value as an introduction to Lacan...[They] are a sure path of entry into Lacan''s critique of ego psychology....Lacan''s work underscores that part of Freud''s message that is most revolutionary for our time. The individual is ''decentred''. There is no autonomous self. What sex was to the Victorians, the question of free will is to our new Fin-de-Siecle.'' --Sherry Turkle, ''London Review of Books''

About the Author

Jacques Lacan was born into an upper-middle-class Parisian family. He received psychiatric and psychoanalytic training, and his clinical training began in 1927. His doctoral thesis, "On Paranoia and Its Relation to Personality," already indicated an original thinker; in it he tried to show that no physiological phenomenon could be adequately understood without taking into account the entire personality, including its engagement with a social milieu. Practicing in France, Lacan led a "back to Freud" movement in the most literal sense, at a time when others were trying to interpret Sigmund Freud (see also Vol. 3) broadly. He emphasized the role of the image and the role of milieu in personality organization. Seeking to reinterpret Freud's theories in terms of structural linguistics, Lacan believed that Freud's greatest insight was his understanding of the "talking cure" as revelatory of the unconscious. By taking Freud literally, Lacan led a psychoanalytic movement that evolved into a very specific school of interpretation. Often embroiled in controversy, in the 1950s he opposed the standardization of training techniques, the classification of psychoanalysis as a medical treatment, and the then emerging school of ego psychology. Although general readers may find Lacan difficult to read, his works are provocative and rewarding.

From Our Editors

'The Seminar: Books I and II have a special place because of their value as an introduction to Lacan...They+ are a sure path of entry into Lacan's critique of ego psychology....Lacan's work underscores that part of Freud's message that is most revolutionary for our time. The individual is 'decentred'. There is no autonomous self. What sex was to the Victorians, the question of free will is to our new Fin-de-Siecle.' --Sherry Turkle, 'London Review of Books'
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