Big Girl: A Novel

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

Big Girl: A Novel

by Danielle Steel

Random House Publishing Group | February 23, 2010 | Hardcover

Big Girl: A Novel is rated 2.2 out of 5 by 5.
In this heartfelt and incisive new novel, Danielle Steel celebrates the virtues of unconventional beauty while exploring deeply resonant issues of weight, self-image, sisterhood, and family. 

    A chubby little girl with blond hair, blue eyes, and ordinary looks, Victoria Dawson has always felt out of place in her family, especially in body-conscious L.A. Her father, Jim, is tall and slender, and her mother, Christina, is a fine-boned, dark-haired beauty. Both are self-centered, outspoken, and disappointed by their daughter’s looks. When Victoria is six, she sees a photograph of Queen Victoria, and her father has always said she looks just like her. After the birth of Victoria’s perfect younger sister, Gracie, her father liked to refer to his firstborn as “our tester cake.” With Gracie, everyone agreed that Jim and Christina got it right.

    While her parents and sister can eat anything and not gain an ounce, Victoria must watch everything she eats, as well as endure her father’s belittling comments about her body and see her academic achievements go unacknowledged. Ice cream and oversized helpings of all the wrong foods give her comfort, but only briefly. The one thing she knows is that she has to get away from home, and after college in Chicago, she moves to New York City.

Landing her dream job as a high school teacher, Victoria loves working with her students and wages war on her weight at the gym. Despite tension with her parents, Victoria remains close to her sister. And though they couldn’t be more different in looks, they love each other unconditionally. But regardless of her accomplishments, Victoria’s parents know just what to say to bring her down. She will always be her father’s “big girl,” and her mother’s constant disapproval is equally unkind.

When Grace announces her engagement to a man who is an exact replica of their narcissistic father, Victoria worries about her sister’s future happiness, and with no man of her own, she feels like a failure once again. As the wedding draws near, a chance encounter, an act of stunning betrayal, and a family confrontation lead to a turning point.

Behind Victoria is a lifetime of hurt and neglect she has tried to forget, and even ice cream can no longer dull the pain. Ahead is a challenge and a risk: to accept herself as she is, celebrate it, and claim the victories she has fought so hard for and deserves. Big girl or not, she is terrific and discovers that herself.
 

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 336 pages, 9.6 × 6.35 × 1.2 in

Published: February 23, 2010

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385343183

ISBN - 13: 9780385343183

Found in: Fiction and Literature

save 94%

  • Out of stock online

$2.00  ea

Online Price

$35.00 List Price

Cart

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from A good read...typical DS, wtih some flaws I enjoyed this book, but I really wanted to like this book more, because I liked the theme of the book. Rarely do you see 'good parents' painted in a bad light like this. It was really an interesting read. Victoria's parents were kind and loving and wanted the best for her, but so caught up in appearances, that they didn't realize that they were really abusing their daughter. It's one of those subtle types of parenting flaws that doesn't get written about very often, so it was interesting to have it included in this book. Victoria really needed to grow a backbone, and it made this book a little irritating to read at times. Also, DS was so mechanic and repetative in most of her narrative, which made this book rather boring at times. I think this book has an important message about dieting and what we need to do to support our daughters as parents - no matter what their size, shape or success.
Date published: 2011-05-23
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Good title Big Girl was a disappointment for me. It seemed like the first 100 pages lead up to the story of a daughter born to a couple who are attractive and successful and are expecting a boy. When their daughter is born she does not resemble them so all her life she is the brunt of jokes mostly by her father. Victoria, aka Big Girl struggles with her weight however the 15-20 pounds she talks about is insignificant compared to what others struggle with in life. The value in this book is the understanding how parents can damage their children by being preoccupied with the outer person rather than the strenghts of the inner person. This message from parents can result in low self-esteem and negative self worth. The reader can easily relate to the struggles Victoria faces in her life and how being overweight can be a daily struggle despite the efforts to lose weight, exercise and eat healthy. Not a bad summer read but not one of Danielle Steel's better books.
Date published: 2010-07-10
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Why do I keep getting sucked in by shiny covers? First of all, 5'7" and 18 lb overweight is NOT a big girl. How out of touch with the world is Steel when she believes that a kid who is 5'7" in grade 8 will feel out of place for being huge? Did she think she was coming up with a white bread version of "Precious?" But, back to the book. Danielle Steel is a master of telling rather than showing, and the sentence structure is boring and predictable. Although there were possibilities with her characters, they all come up flat -- mean little stereotypes. Victoria is, of course, more sympathetic, but even she is a stereotype of every fat girl who spends Saturday nights scarfing down ice cream. Yeah, we get it. She's Rhoda from the "Mary Tyler Moore Show," looking for love in an ice cream carton. The point of view is all over the place. How this gets by editors is beyond me. Maybe there are enough people who keep thinking they'll give Danielle Steel one more chance. (damn you, shiny pink cover!) What really bothered me in this book is how the details just aren't right. Once again, bad editing. Ironically, she talks about how the kids in the private school where Victoria works are out of touch, and yet the tiny room that Victoria sublets in a NY apartment holds a queen sized bed, two night tables, a dresser, a comfortable chair in the corner, and an armoire. Maybe in Steel's world, but that would be a large master bedroom, not the tiny 4th bedroom, in most city apartments. Also, despite Victoria's relative poverty, she makes and changes plane reservations on a moment's notice. Maybe in Steel's world, but in the real world, you book ahead and can't change because of the cancellation fee. I know I'm being picky, but this lack of attention to details distracts from a story line that is already weak. Save your money and buy something else.
Date published: 2010-05-22
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Horrible! I read this entire book. I don't know why I read to the end, maybe I was hoping it was going to get better. I am a big girl and the book made it sound that all big people do is eat ice cream. It really upsets me that Danielle's idea of large women is: lazy, unmotivated, doesn't exercise and eats ice cream daily. Plus, the character's parents were unbelievable, and the "just revenge" was pathetic and not enough for what the poor character put up with her life. I hope when people read this, it does reinforce that you have to be skinny to be happy and also a cosmetic surgery helps too.
Date published: 2010-05-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A good read! A was super skeptical about reading a book called "Big Girl" written by an author who has NEVER been "big" a day in her life! I was impressed.....she really was able to capture the essence of someone struggling with weight! I loved the reference to food being like the "bottle under the bed". I was there 30 lbs ago and was able to laugh along with Victoria as she came to like the person she was, find love and just accept the fact that her family was flawed. This is a decent summer read for the beach or cottage; nothing to deep but you find yourself cheering Victoria along!!!
Date published: 2010-04-30

– More About This Product –

Big Girl: A Novel

by Danielle Steel

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 336 pages, 9.6 × 6.35 × 1.2 in

Published: February 23, 2010

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385343183

ISBN - 13: 9780385343183

About the Book

A chubby little girl with blond hair, blue eyes, and ordinary looks, Victoria Dawson knows she has been a disappointment to her family. As an adult, Victoria struggles to accept herself as she is and win the personal victories she has fought so hard for and deserves.

Read from the Book

Chapter One Jim Dawson was handsome from the day he was born. He was an only child, tall for his age, had a perfect physique, and was an exceptional athlete as he grew older, and the hub of his parents’ world. They were both in their forties when he was born, and he was a blessing and surprise, after years of trying to have a child. They had given up hope, and then their perfect baby boy appeared. His mother looked at him adoringly as she held him in her arms. His father loved to play ball with him. He was the star of his Little League team, and as he grew older, the girls swooned over him in school. He had dark hair and velvety brown eyes and a pronounced cleft in his chin, like a movie star. He was captain of the football team in college, and no one was surprised when he dated the homecoming queen, a pretty girl whose family had moved to southern California from Atlanta in freshman year. She was petite and slim with hair and eyes as dark as his, and skin like Snow White. She was gentle and soft spoken and in awe of him. They got engaged the night of graduation and married on Christmas the same year. Jim had a job in an ad agency by then, and Christine spent the six months after graduation preparing for their wedding. She had gotten her bachelor’s degree, but her only real interest during her four years in college was finding a husband and getting married. And they were a dazzling pair with their flawless all-American good looks. They were a perfect complement to
read more read less

From the Publisher

In this heartfelt and incisive new novel, Danielle Steel celebrates the virtues of unconventional beauty while exploring deeply resonant issues of weight, self-image, sisterhood, and family. 

    A chubby little girl with blond hair, blue eyes, and ordinary looks, Victoria Dawson has always felt out of place in her family, especially in body-conscious L.A. Her father, Jim, is tall and slender, and her mother, Christina, is a fine-boned, dark-haired beauty. Both are self-centered, outspoken, and disappointed by their daughter’s looks. When Victoria is six, she sees a photograph of Queen Victoria, and her father has always said she looks just like her. After the birth of Victoria’s perfect younger sister, Gracie, her father liked to refer to his firstborn as “our tester cake.” With Gracie, everyone agreed that Jim and Christina got it right.

    While her parents and sister can eat anything and not gain an ounce, Victoria must watch everything she eats, as well as endure her father’s belittling comments about her body and see her academic achievements go unacknowledged. Ice cream and oversized helpings of all the wrong foods give her comfort, but only briefly. The one thing she knows is that she has to get away from home, and after college in Chicago, she moves to New York City.

Landing her dream job as a high school teacher, Victoria loves working with her students and wages war on her weight at the gym. Despite tension with her parents, Victoria remains close to her sister. And though they couldn’t be more different in looks, they love each other unconditionally. But regardless of her accomplishments, Victoria’s parents know just what to say to bring her down. She will always be her father’s “big girl,” and her mother’s constant disapproval is equally unkind.

When Grace announces her engagement to a man who is an exact replica of their narcissistic father, Victoria worries about her sister’s future happiness, and with no man of her own, she feels like a failure once again. As the wedding draws near, a chance encounter, an act of stunning betrayal, and a family confrontation lead to a turning point.

Behind Victoria is a lifetime of hurt and neglect she has tried to forget, and even ice cream can no longer dull the pain. Ahead is a challenge and a risk: to accept herself as she is, celebrate it, and claim the victories she has fought so hard for and deserves. Big girl or not, she is terrific and discovers that herself.
 

About the Author

Danielle Steel has been hailed as one of the world’s most popular authors, with over 590 million copies of her novels sold. Her many international bestsellers include Southern Lights, Matters of the Heart, One Day at a Time, A Good Woman, Rogue, Honor Thyself, and other highly acclaimed novels. She is also the author of His Bright Light, the story of her son Nick Traina’s life and death.
Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart