Frankenstein

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Frankenstein

by Mary Shelley
Introduction by Peter Harrison

International Alliance Pro-Publishing, LLC | November 23, 2010 | Hardcover

Frankenstein is rated 4.4286 out of 5 by 14.
Frankenstein is the classic novel about a monster created by scientist Victor Frankenstein. Frankenstein is infused with some elements of Gothic novel and the Romantic movement, and is considered to be one of the earliest examples of science fiction.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 176 pages, 6 × 9 × 0.56 in

Published: November 23, 2010

Publisher: International Alliance Pro-Publishing, LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1609421523

ISBN - 13: 9781609421526

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best books I've ever read A dark well written novel that makes you wonder who the real monster is
Date published: 2014-09-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Literary Gold. . . Alas, I have not had the delightful pleasure to read this novel since my tender youthful days. The sheer beauty for which this novel was written was wasted on my naïve youthfulness. The plot of this novel is forever iconic and will forever remain in our collective culture. The novel is a tale of a man whose life ambition is to abolish dead from society and preserve life. Instead he creates a being which after completion he rejects, only to have terrible and unfortunate events to follow. I’m forever grateful that I’ve reread Frankenstein, for now I consider it one of my favourite books. I implore anyone who hasn’t read this novel, to go and grab a copy. This is literature at its finest, and from such a young author that such a feat is unfathomable. This is truly a treasure to the world and should be cherished for all eternity.
Date published: 2012-02-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Groundbreaking This truly was one of it's own when it was published in 1818, nothing was even close to this stature. Mary Shelley, much like Victor Frankenstein, created this new horrifying species of books that instead of dying out created many interpretations and inspired upcoming writers. Even almost 200 years later here we are with Frankenstein represented as a children's Halloween character. This just shows how spectacular this book was and still is. I really quite enjoyed it and recommend it to anyone who's looking for a well-written suspenseful thriller.
Date published: 2012-01-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Read Frankentein is a great read. Frankenstein is written by Mary Shelley. Frankenstein is written in the form of a frame story that starts with Captain Robert Walton writing letters to his sister. In his letters, he tells Victor Frankenstein's story, which includes the monster's story. By doing so, Shelley creates a nesting doll effect that allows the readers to see the three characters' perspective of the one larger story. Frankenstein explores themes such as; Dangerous Knowledge, Sublime Nature and Monstrosity. I would reccomend this book for anyone who would like to know the real story of Frankenstein, and not the Hollywood adaptation.
Date published: 2012-01-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from On "Frankenstein" When was the last time you solved an emotional problem using a geographic solution? What happens at our destination? Our demons pursue us. And in turn the demon is pursued by it's mad scientist. Thus the story of Frankenstein. What specific trouble in particular drove our deluded captain to obsession and determination to reach the extreme northernmost point away from his origins is unimportant because the reasons behind self-loathing are beside the point. Whether endeavouring to escape, or to protect those he loved, from his own perceived evil, in isolation he reconciled the madness that motivated him in his past life and the resulting so-called monster in the form of his imaginary travelling companion, Dr. Frankenstein, and his abomination, united on his stranded boat lodged in an iceberg. Sometimes that's what it takes. Reliving his own experience through the lense of Dr. Frankenstein's account afforded our captain a necessary perspective. As he travelled from Germany to Switzerland to Holland to England to Scotland, crossing rivers and mountains, the monster materialized wherever he happened to be; and no one ever saw the fiend other than he. Was the doctor himself the serial killer? Did he blame himself / his inability to cure his brother and friend and wife? Or did he hurt these loved ones in some way that he internalized as murder? It doesn't matter, because the story is about you and me. What cringeworthy thoughts of our own forge themselves into symbols and as such haunt with a vengence? Perhaps we ought to do what Mary Shelley did: invent a genre of literature, so we can turn the ship around and go home rather than freeze to death. http://jimmyflanger.wordpress.com/2011/10/02/on-frankenstein/
Date published: 2011-10-02
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Wasn't bad. I really enjoyed the story but not so much the writting because it is old-fashioned and I couldn't understand most of it. If I didn't have to read it for school I definitely wouldn't have read it. The story line is good but hard to read. The book was different than the story I thought I knew. I was rooting for the monsters the entire time !
Date published: 2011-03-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Awesome Book Frankenstein was a great book. It was interesting because hollywood portrays the creature as a horrible being that just wanted destruction. The beast just wanted to be loved and accepted. When the creature was rejected it got mad and took vengence on the people. This book was very interesting to read as well as entertaining. The book shows how cruel some people might be and really got me to think of how I treat others. Over all I think this was a great and interesting book and I might reread this book to get the full understanding of this book.
Date published: 2011-01-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic for Horror Lovers It's an old-time story but that's what makes it such a classic. It sends a good message through the story you'll probably have to think about by the time you're done reading this book. It is a difficult read for some but if you're a horror fan, this is a must read! I loved it.
Date published: 2011-01-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A moving, disturbing, depressing, but also touching tale Much like Bram Stoker's "Dracula", Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is a story we all think we know, but really don't. Very few films have consciously attempted to follow the novel too closely (which shouldn't detract from the excellent James Whale/Boris Karloff film, or its masterpiece-sequel, "The Bride of Frankenstein). Thus, everything popular culture "knows" about "Frankenstein" does not originate from literature, but from films. This is a shame, in a way, because the novel itself is, if not the progenitor, an early vessel of so many archetypes found science fiction and horror. The basic plot remained intact when transferred to other media. Swiss medical student Victor Frankenstein discovers the secret of life (which he never reveals, lest someone repeat the mistake). He then puts together a body, essentially a man, from various corpses. He then becomes horrified by the creature he has built, and abandons. The creature, suffering a great deal of neglect and abuse, still manages to get a thorough education, and learns of his lineage. After murdering Victor's younger brother, and framing the family maid, the creature tells his (admittedly) sad tale to his "father", and then demands a mate. Victor, in a panic, agrees, then thinks better of it at the last moment, destroying the new bride. In retaliation, the creature murders all of Victor's loved ones (including his wife), and leads Victor on a merry chase across the world. Most probably know that Mary Shelley wrote this book in response to a challenge issued by Lord Byron, during a vacation at Lake Geneva. (Along with this story came John Polidori's "The Vampyre", the first English vampire novel.) Most probably also know that Shelley went on to write other works of imaginative gothic fiction. Still, her modern reputation rests with this book, understandably. As stated, numerous archetypes (themes, plot lines, characters) are present here. The basic fear of what evil technology may bring along with the good is a central theme, as is the warning against playing God. So is the implicit admonition to be responsible in all things, be it during innovation or being a parent. The creature is, for all intents and purposes, an android-everyone from Gort to C-3PO owe their existence to the Frankenstein monster. And the monster that slays all but one protagonist is a staple of horror, be it traditional monster movies, like "Alien", or more realistic slasher movies like "Halloween". But, as I noted at the beginning of this review, certain of these elements have been lost in most interpretations. The creature is actually intelligent, and well-spoken, quite different from the inarticulate grunts or slow, half-sentences of the movies (again, no disrespect to Karloff). Further, while the films have made lightening a staple of the creatures creation, Shelley never really explains the process (probably knowing that she might interfere with the plausibility of her work). Finally, one of the staples of the films is the explanation for the creatures "evil" nature. Often, the problem lies with the brain used, which almost invariably is a criminal brain, or is damaged before implantation. In the book, the creature is really a child that's horribly neglected, but with the strength and intelligence to strike back: id without superego, and without restraints. Thus, "Frankenstein" will be a new experience for readers who have never experienced it. Unlike "Dracula", there aren't any moments where a reader might look up and suddenly realize how quiet it is in the house, or how dark it's gotten outside. In that regard, "Frankenstein" has not aged particularly well. Throughout, however, it is a moving, disturbing, depressing, but also a touching and beautiful tale. Those qualities have withstood the test of time. While it is not always a rollicking adventure, it is a rewarding read.
Date published: 2009-09-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great Classic while I really enjoyed reading this book from a classical lit perspective, people should be ready that it really isn't anything like how the movies portay Frankenstein's monster. It can be a bit wordy at times and a little drawn out at places. Loved it all the same. ^_^
Date published: 2008-08-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Frankenstein "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley is a fascinating book. I was prejudiced by the film adaptations of this novel. To start with I had no idea that Frankenstein is actually Victor Frankenstein, the creator of a monster. The monster that was created is not called Frankenstein; it is his creator's name. The monster is the creation of Victor Frankenstein and the monster is lithe, strong, fast and intelligent; this again differs greatly from any film version of the book. In reading the book I sympathized with the monster that is spurned by his master and by all who gaze upon his repugnant form. The monster flees from society and lives in a hovel, while secretly observing a family which consists of a blind father, a daughter and a son. In observing the family the monster learns their language and learns about love and acceptance and thus learns about the wretchedness of his own existence; how he longs to be part of the family. He attempts to join the family, but one glance at his hideous frame and the family rejects him with great horror. The monster then seeks out his maker and is rejected once again and this turns his soul to malevolence and revenge. Victor Frankenstein loses his brother, friend and wife to the monsters murdering hands and indirectly the monster is responsible for the death of Victor's father and a friend of Victor’s family. Victor pursues his creation to the ends of earth to rid mankind of the fiend. The story ends up in the North Pole and the ending is tragic. Victor loses his life in his journey and once his creator is dead the monster decides there is no reason for his own existence. "Frankenstein" is a fabulous read, a read that has you sympathizing with the monster. His creator rejected him when all he wanted was acceptance. Mankind rejected him due to his hideous appearance. He was kind and giving, but turned to hatred and evil due to society's rejection of his physical being. "Frankenstein" is a thought provoking read.
Date published: 2008-08-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Frankenstein has all the best. The romance, the action and the inner depth of morality. The story is that of passion and the sorrow the "monster" feels throughout his short life and the power of the human soul. At the worst time the beast wanted nothing more than that of comfort and a companion, to which he was denied. A tale of promise and literature and the power and consequence of knowledge. A must for all who read...
Date published: 2006-07-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Age does nothing to dull this book I wasn't expecting the story I got when I read this for the first time. Everyone knows about the monster...or do they? The questions about our own mortality and mankind's desire to live are brilliantly woven into a plot that so many people assume is little more than a B-movie. Some haunting images still visit my imagination when I think of this book. WOW!!!
Date published: 2006-03-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I did this for grade 11 eng independent study... ...and it was great. The book was recommended to me by by teacher. I thought, since it was of literary value, that it must be boring. But it is very interesting, and you can actually understand it and relate to it. Before buying the book, I read online reviews and was disappointed because lots os people urged others not to read it. I would recommend this books to others, though. My personal background: I like to read a variety of materials, do well in english, and never read classic novels outside of study purposes.
Date published: 2004-10-23

– More About This Product –

Frankenstein

by Mary Shelley
Introduction by Peter Harrison

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 176 pages, 6 × 9 × 0.56 in

Published: November 23, 2010

Publisher: International Alliance Pro-Publishing, LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1609421523

ISBN - 13: 9781609421526

About the Book

Frankenstein is the classic novel about a monster created by scientist Victor Frankenstein. Frankenstein is infused with some elements of Gothic novel and the Romantic movement, and is considered to be one of the earliest examples of science fiction.
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