Julie and Julia: My Year Of Cooking Dangerously

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Julie and Julia: My Year Of Cooking Dangerously

by Julie Powell

Little, Brown And Company | July 1, 2009 | Mass Market Paperbound

Julie and Julia: My Year Of Cooking Dangerously is rated 2.9394 out of 5 by 33.
Julie & Julia, the bestselling memoir that''s "irresistible....A kind ofBridget JonesmeetsThe French Chef" (Philadelphia Inquirer), is now a major motion picture. Julie Powell, nearing thirty and trapped in a dead-end secretarial job, resolves to reclaim her life by cooking in the span of a single year, every one of the 524 recipes in Julia Child''s legendaryMastering the Art of French Cooking. Her unexpected reward: not just a newfound respect for calves'' livers and aspic, but a new life-lived with gusto. The film is written and directed by Nora Ephron and stars Amy Adams as Julie and Meryl Streep as Julia.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 400 pages, 6.75 × 4.12 × 1 in

Published: July 1, 2009

Publisher: Little, Brown And Company

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 031604251X

ISBN - 13: 9780316042512

Found in: Biography and Memoir

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Maybe I'll Watch The Movie... I came across this book and once I read the back, I thought I would definitely be able to relate to Julie. I feel her pain with being stuck in a dead end job and I love to cook! I very much enjoyed the beginning of the book and it gave me hope that the rest of the book would follow through. The thing is it didn't. Some of the parts were actually comical, don't get me wrong. But as the book went on, I started getting bored as the same ol' things were happening over and over. Julie is cooking a new recipe, messes it up, yells at her husband, and adds another post to her blog. Near the end, I was no longer able to relate with Julie. Therefore, I lost interest...
Date published: 2012-09-13
Rated 2 out of 5 by from could've been better....i think i'll watch the movie too normally when i read the novel and it's amazing i will refuse to watch the movie. the film always butchers the book, characters and general feeling of the book. my absolutely fave about this book is her cooking from Child's recipes and her difficulties- she's funny. And she is a huge fan of BUFFY (awesome i totally love buffy too) i would have preferred powell to explain some of the recipes in english. she did with most, but i needed a better description. maybe it's just me, because i don't cook. the book is delicious the recipes she makes- yum-o interesting experiment- based on true events. not hilarious to me movie probably funnier, but some parts give you a chuckle.
Date published: 2012-06-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I liked this 3.5 stars Julie Powell is coming up on her 30th birthday and is a secretary. She decides she will embark on a one-year project - to cook all the recipes in Julia Child's cookbook, Mastering the Fine Art of French Cooking, and to blog about it. I liked this. Not as much as the movie, but the movie also incorporated My Life in France by Julia Child, so it was a mix of the two (and I haven't read My Life in France yet, but I plan to). But I still quite enjoyed this. I am not a foodie, but this may even be more enjoyable for those who are, with all the descriptions of the food. Actually, I'm a picky eater and some of that food... well, eeew! But, it was fun to read about Julie's mishaps in the kitchen! I don't like to cook, and I have to say that this book just says it all! It's just way too much effort!!! But, fun to read about. I also enjoyed the relationships that Julie made with her "bleaders" (what she called her blog readers), and how those developed.
Date published: 2012-02-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not great - the movie is better *** SPOILERS ALERT!! *** I like to cook. Most of the time, I’m good with thinking up dinner recipes – or finding ones in cookbooks, baking cakes, cookies, and whatnot, and just creating things in the kitchen. Sometimes I need motivation. When I started reading Julie Powell’s book Julie and Julia I felt very motivated. After reading the first chapter, I dug out my cookbooks and planned meals for the next couple days. And I really enjoyed cooking them. Halfway through the book I realized that it was all pretty much the same thing happening. Julie cooks Julia’s recipes – they either turn out well or they’re garbage. She works her way through the entire Mastering the Art of French Cooking book, eating things like liver, duck, marrow, etc. She swears, she cries, her husband helps her at times, she feeds friends and family, she writes on her blog (which was a pretty new concept when she had started blogging). At this halfway point, I realized that while Julie is “finding herself” while cooking, it’s also the same thing over and over again. She cooks, they eat, she goes to her day job, people notice her blog and she experiences a bit of fame. After this point, I put the book down. I was bored. She cooked. She wasn’t a cleaner (maybe I’m a clean freak, but the thought of those little black flies in my kitchen, and the part with the maggots just didn’t sit well with me – who lets their kitchen get that way?). She was gaining weight because of the sheer amount of fat used in the cooking. She didn’t like her office job because it wasn’t helping her discover herself. Blah, blah, blah. I started reading Julie and Julia at the beginning of November. Now, at the beginning of December, after reading 4 other books, I’ve finished reading it. I didn’t feel enlightened after finishing the book. In fact, I didn’t even feel the urge to cook anymore. Julie Powell is a decent writer, though she does stray from topic to topic throughout the book. One thing would remind her of another and she’d go off talking about something else. As a reader, I didn’t feel intrigued to get to the end of the book – I assumed she’d work her way to the end of MtAoFC and discover herself. It wasn’t like reading a regular fiction book – there was no suspense, no intrigue, no mystery. In fact, by the end of the book there were a few endings (where Julie felt the need to write “The End”. Twice.) where I just thought to myself, “Finish it already!” By the end of the book, Julie cooks her final dish well, but still doesn’t really know how to cook. I don’t want to toot my own horn, but I do find myself to be slightly more capable in the kitchen which might be why I couldn’t relate to Julie. When something goes wrong, I’m not swearing. I don’t let the dishes pile up for days. Cooking is more therapeutic for me rather than a chore (which is what the Julie/Julia Project seemed to be like for Julie). I’m not the best cook in the world – in fact, far from it – but I manage. After following a “how to” cookbook for a year I would think I’d be better in the kitchen, just as I thought Julie would have turned into a better chef than she was at the start of the book. I’m very interested to watch the movie with Meryl Streep and Amy Adams – perhaps it’ll keep my interest more than the book did. On another note, at the end of the book there is an excerpt from Julie Powell’s next book Cleaving: a Story of Marriage, Meat, and Obsession. After reading bits of that excerpt, I noticed it was the same kind of writing as in Julie and Julia and I really don’t see myself purchasing it. I’m not sure why, after writing a memoir about food, Julie would write yet another memoir about food. Instead of working her way through a cookbook, she’s discovering herself as a butcher. Wow. Maybe she’s just trying to stretch out those 15 minutes of fame. I think I would give the book 2 stars out of 5. Now, we’ll see how the movie fares.
Date published: 2012-01-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A good read I read this book over the course of one of my Saturday shifts at work. The call volume was low and I had time between calls to motor through this book. Julie & Julia is a fast and very easy read. That doesn't to say it's too simple to really care about, because it isn't. I would have given it five stars, because I did like it quite a lot, but I'm not a fan of letters interjecting narrative. They pull me right out of the story and I don't find them all that interesting. But I enjoyed hearing of Julie's adventures in the kitchen. I dare say I liked it so much better than the movie. But usually that's the case with movies and books they're based on, am I right?
Date published: 2010-06-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not my favorite... ...definitely not my favorite book....it wasnt horrible and I would recommend it to people if they were out of ideas but overall its not great.
Date published: 2010-05-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Better than I expected I got this book as a gift and it sat at the bottom of a pile of books for a couple of weeks. Then I was at a salon going through a magazine and there was an excerpt of Julie Powell's next book and apparently she had an affair after the cooking project, and in that little excerpt there was so much humour and drama- well I had to go home and start reading ' Julie and Julia' ...and it was so hilarious! She is a little crazy and thats what made this book even more enjoyable.
Date published: 2010-02-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I love Julie Powell I recently watched the movie version of this book and I was immediately drawn to Julie. Her life and mine are so similar, it's crazy. (I even share her love of Buffy the Vampire Slayer...HAHAHA.) I can see myself doing what she did, maybe not to the extent that she did, but at least 75-80% of it. So, I decided that I would read her book, to see if it was as good as the movie. So far, I LOVE it. I love her comments, her sense of humor, and the way that she describes her cooking fiascos. (I just finished reading about the bone marrow incident, and I loved it...as gross as it was, lol, it was still funny reading it.) Anyhow, I recommend this book to anyone and everyone. 2 thumbs up :)
Date published: 2010-01-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Laugh Out Loud! I read this book before seeing the movie and am glad that I did as there are some subtle scenes included in the book that were not in the movie. Powell's account of her year cooking through Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child brings alive the chaos that her life must have been at the time! The lobster tales are so funny that you can't help but laugh out loud. There was less about Julia Child in the book but that did not detract in any way. This book was good enough to convince me to buy her next one, "Cleaving: A Story of Marriage, Meat and Obsession."
Date published: 2010-01-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Lots of fun I had a lot of fun reading this book. Made me want to attempt a project like this myself, or at least eat more french food.
Date published: 2009-11-11
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Cheese Souffle vs Grilled Cheese Put succinctly I had a love/hate relationship with Julie Powell's book Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously. Unlike some of her critics I do applaud Powell's leap from the world of blogging into that of a published author. Many of her detractors have made it all about the food but that wasn't why she embarked on 524 Recipes in 365 days; Jennie Yabroff in her Newsweek article Stop Hating Julie Powell, Please covers this well. What Ms. Powell did need was someone to remind her that when people stop reading your words for free and start laying down money for your book, you then have an obligation to give them a reasonably professional product and that is where she just doesn't deliver. Some of her word choices and phrasing were barely at a high school grammar 101 level. Attempts to be avant guard through drawing on sexual encounters (hers and those of her friends), a preoccupation with her own body odors and the ad nauseum descriptions about the grunge and filth of her apartment were imitations of twenty-something writers who had gone before her and who have done it so much better. When she isn't trying so hard and returns to the realness of her life the book improves. I enjoyed reading about the bona fide world of Julie Powell. This is also where she stops being a blogger and remembers that she is an author as her prose takes us through the drudgery of her day job, her escalating enthusiasm for cooking, to her growing obsession with completing the project Mastering the Art of French Cooking and even her feelings for Julia Child. It was a stark contrast indeed that while reading Julie & Julia I came across an excerpt from Elizabeth McCracken's book 'An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination'. After years of reading it is not often that one can still stumble on an author who really draws you in. She has a wonderful style that never slips into some of the slickness that so many do. She writes about life events and emotions with a refreshing clarity and where I really felt a connection was her sense of humor; the 'dwarves of grief' that she refers to will forever have a place in my imagination and I will definitely be ordering one of her books for my winter reading Authors such as Elizabeth McCracken provide a quality source of reading pleasure, and while pop culture figures such as Julie Powell may stretch their 15 minutes of fame into 30; I for one won't be finding the time to read any more of her books.
Date published: 2009-11-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Nice and Dry I really like the writing syle. Her nice dry humour is makes me smile and nod. It is honest and realistic, something us common folk can relate too.
Date published: 2009-10-30
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Did not finish reading I had to stop reading by page 180. It was torture just to get through the first few chapters. You hope that it gets better but it doesn't. Its boring and I became very agitated when I was reading this book. The writing as well as the character irritated me.
Date published: 2009-10-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good, not great This is a fun, light-hearted account of one woman's attempt to get her life back on track. It's not a cookbook or a step-by-step book on how to start a blog, become a writer or even how to cook, but it is a fun read.
Date published: 2009-10-07
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Disappointing I really didn't like this book. It seemed very off-topic, self-involved, and incredibly boring. I was expecting more of a book about cooking and the recipes and actually about her "cooking dangerously", but instead learned more than I ever cared to know about the personal lives of people she knew, and about how she was amused at people online objecting to her using the f-word often in her blog posts. I have written a more in-depth review here: http://eclecticbookshelf.com/?p=12
Date published: 2009-10-06
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Truly Disappointing... I started reading this book after watching the movie in the theatre this past Summer. All I can say is that the movie depicted Julie Powell as a nice, sweet, some what eccentric individual who went throught the year working on cooking her way through Julia Child's cook book. But after reading it 3/4 way through the book, I found her extremely talentless, as well an annoying selfish individual. They writing itself is filled with anger, swearing and most of all, stuff I didn't care much. This is one of the books you will find in a bargain bin at Christmas time at a local grocery store. Where and why you would read this book? A: I was bored and there is nothing good on the television. I read this mostly in bed, it made me tired and feel sorry on how Julie Powell has a bad hygiene issue, as well a fear that her husband will divorce her.
Date published: 2009-10-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Incredibly honest This was a story I had hard time to make an opinion on. At the end, I can say that even though I could do without some of the images suggested by the story, I could not help but admire the honesty of the writer. It takes a special person to lay things out just the way they are, without embellishments and/or disguise. It also takes a special person to appreciate this narrative just the way it is…
Date published: 2009-10-01
Rated 3 out of 5 by from OK but.... This isn't a classic. It's "cute" and I wouldn't read her next one. One is enough..... There are life lessons that we all could learn from her so there are redeeming qualities.
Date published: 2009-09-22
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Lacks spice With all the hype surrounding the movie, I was eager to dig into Julie & Julia. Unfortunately, I found the story of Julie to be dull and it dragged on too long. Her challenge and quest to get of a life rut was interesting, but not entertaining.
Date published: 2009-09-08
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Julie and Julia "Julie and Julia" by Julie Powell is the story of Julie Powell writing blogs about her journey through Julia Child's famous book "Mastering the Art of French Cooking". Julie decides to cook her way through every recipe in the book within a year and write about her experiences in a blog. I was expecting a great book about food and about the history of Julia Child and about the experiences of a novice cook, cooking her way through Julia's cookbook. What I got was a story about drinking, swearing, sex and friends with a bit of the stuff I was looking for. I did not become attached to Julie Powell and could not relate to her problems and how she handled her life. Do people really drink that much? Being a self proclaimed foodie I wanted so much more about the cooking experience itself instead of all the personal trauma and whining that Julie writes about...it was an agitating read.
Date published: 2009-09-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Cute When Julie breaks down after being given a speech on how she should start having children before it's too late one too many times, her husband Eric helps her come up with a project to take her mind off things; cook all recipes in Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking within a year. That's 524 recipes and some are not for the faint of heart. This includes aspic, liver, kidneys, chopping up a live lobster, and even brain. Julie took to the internet to blog her progress, which is how we ended up with this book. The book was quirky and cute. Interspersed in the book though are letters from Paul Child, Julia's husband. These felt incredibly out of place. Don't go into this book expecting it to be more about Julia Child than Julie Powell, or expecting to find out anything new about Julia Child. This is really just a documentation of a cooking experiment, the way things can go horribly wrong in the kitchen, and life in New York City. This book isn't the best written book in the world, nor the most interesting, but if you're looking for a quick fun read this shouldn't disappoint.
Date published: 2009-09-04
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Horrid waste of time!!!! Let's be clear that this woman had a blog published. She took an interesting journey but she is no writer. She wasted so many opportunities to link to Julia Child and the reason behind Julia's passion. Instead she focused on stupid tangents about her sex life and that of her friends. Despite her attempt to make the rest of us seem boring, her use of the F-bomb does not add anything to the book other than reinforcing the limitations of her vocabulary. This book was a real shame. Thank goodness the movie leverages significant material from Julia Child's book - My Life in France.
Date published: 2009-08-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not what I expected Book is more about Julie than Julia--I had thought it would be more or less equal time on both of their success/failures with the reciepes but on the whole not too bad still a fairly good read
Date published: 2009-08-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ok - but I hope the movie is better..... The blog didn't translate well into a book. I can see how the movie will be better. In the book there was too much Julie and not enough Julia.
Date published: 2009-08-18
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Reviews seem to be PR Gave this one a 2.5/5 - not bad, but very easy to put aside - a 'vanity' book perhaps. Certainly, Julie is not the Chris Rock of Cuisine. Redeeming feature: got me interested in Julia Child again - have ordered a couple of bios to read. So there is a 'redeeming quality' to this otherwise ordinary beach read.
Date published: 2009-08-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Bon Appetit! (This review was originally posted on http://errantknave.blogspot.com/) What was it that attracted me to this book? The cooking? The Paris/New York combination? The upcoming film version? I think it was a mix of all three. I must admit that I was wary at first. The book is a memoir, a genre that used to be non-fiction until James Frey and his ilk blew it up into a million little pieces. On the other hand, the film posters and the movie tie-in edition of Julie and Julia had me thinking the book would be chick-lit. That wouldn't be so bad, but could I handle another fluff piece? (James Patterson, all is not yet forgiven for Sundays at Tiffany's). I worried for nothing. Julie and Julia is not chick-lit at all. Nor is it a bad memoir. Julie and Julia is named after the project Julie Powell started in 2002, when she was 29. Her goal was to cook her way through Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking in a year, risking well-being and sanity for... well, we'll get to that. 524 recipes in 365 days. It's an interesting premise, and readers get the full experience of the highs and lows of Julie's Year of Cooking Dangerously. Whatever you may think of the premise, the book has literary merits. Powell knows how to write well. True, the book sometimes reads like a blog--for the good reason that Powell blogged about the project for a year before turning it into book--but several passages rise above that. From being a government drone to hacking bone marrow, or from living in a hellish "loft" in Queens to saving a crumbling marriage, everything rings of authenticity. Julie begins her project in anonymity, but within a short time she has a loyal following of blog readers, also known as the bleaders. When the going gets tough (and sometimes it gets very, very tough), Julie is compelled to continue. It took me about half the book to understand just how challenging this project actually was; cooking all those recipes--french cuisine, no less--from scratch, nearly every day for a year. Sometimes the same recipe would have to be made every day for a week because it formed the foundation of another recipe. Sometimes the same thing would have to be cooked several times in the same day because it would not turn out. All this while working as a government secretary, and trying to keep a marriage intact. The problem with being so busy is there aren't many outlets for frustration. Her husband, Eric, is a huge help. If their marriage could withstand that year, it can withstand anything. Julie's friends give moral support when they can, but they're not around that much, and they're underdrawn. At least the bleaders are supportive, and there's always vodka gimlets and episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Reading the cooking sections works two ways. On the one hand, it's great for the details. This is an average person in an average kitchen, making all the mistakes that someone with no chef training would make. And that's fantastic. It's real, and it sucks you in. Readers will be right there with Julie, cursing Julia Child and MtAoFC when something goes wrong over one mis-read instruction in the cookbook. On the other hand, be prepared for some very vivid images. Some recipes are not for the faint of heart. You could be a red-blooded meatitarian with nothing but disdain for vegans, and you will still want to take a breather after some of Julie's ordeals. Even the author had to take a break and visit her parents in Texas after a couple of episodes with lobsters. Occasionally there are little sections--vignettes, almost--about Julia Child, written from her husband Paul's perspective. We get to see Julia after she was a World War II spy, but before she became interested in cooking. It's an interesting parallel, although there could have been more of it. In closing, I think this is a really good book. It is vivid and insightful, and there is a lot that will feel familiar to anyone who is or has been a twentysomething in need of a purpose in life. Which brings us to the reason behind the Julie/Julia project. Early on in the book, Julie's mother asks her why she is doing the project. Julie doesn't really know, but the answer becomes more apparent with each month as she does battle in the kitchen. It's about finding inspiration and dedication, even if you risk your health and sanity, and even if you put on twenty pounds of butter-weight. Verdict: Recommended NOTE: For anyone going to see the movie, it shares the same name as the book, but the film is actually a combination of this memoir, and My Life in France, by Julia Child.
Date published: 2009-08-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Bon Appetit Lost in her life, Julie decides to find purpose by cooking Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Not my choice to find life affirming, but hey! what ever works for you. What I enjoyed most about this book was that is really wasn't about cooking: it was about Julie discovering who and what she was. It was about her realizing all she had (great husband, family, friends, her self) and appreciating it. For me, that was the best part of this book, watching her retell how she learned who she was. Overall, a fun book. I laughed, and I sympathised. I liked her, and would love to have her over for dinner.
Date published: 2009-07-12
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not good at all This book has an interesting premise about cooking your way through a cookbook, and I picked it up because it sounded like a fascinating project. Unfortunately, this author spends way too much time talking about her own life, which is so utterly unrelated to the topic at hand. Also, there are these excerpts of some completely unrelated story that I simply don't have the patience to read. Her writing style is about to give me a seizure. The story flips forward and back and lends no creativity to the story, except to make the reader confused. I have read a couple of run-on sentences that made my head spin. Here's one: "I scooped up all the Q-tips from the counter and the floor and started to stuff them back into the jar before realizing I'd probably gotten them all contaminated, so then I shoved them into a pile next to an apothecary jar full of fresh needles and squeezed myself back into the vintage forties suit I'd been so proud of that morning when Nate from work told me it made my waist look small while subtly eyeing my cleavage, but which on the ride from lower Manhattan to the Upper East Side on an un-air-conditioned 6 train had gotten sweatstained and rumpled." I ask you: what in the hell does this have to do with someone who decides to cook her way through Julia Child's cookbook? Clearly, the author thinks so highly of herself that she had the audacity to think that her kitschy NYC life would garner the interests of readers, but I'm afraid I disagree entirely. If this author was able to write a successful story in such a juvenile and haphazard manner, then anyone else can - the writing style is mediocre at best. Furthermore, I cannot believe that she will likely make a killing from selling the story for movie rights.
Date published: 2009-07-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A delightful summer read This is an engaging, intelligent, and funny story of a young woman who takes on a self-imposed challenge of cooking her way through Julia Child's classic, Mastering The Art of French Cooking. It made me laugh out loud. If you've ever been accused of being too hard on yourself, whether or not you're interested in French cooking, you'll love Julie, and gain a warm acceptance for the Julie in you.
Date published: 2009-07-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyable When I read the description for this book I thought I would give it a try, I love watching cooking shows so what better then a book based on cooking your way through an entire cook book. I enjoyed this book a lot, Julie is a crazy gal, I mean who decides to try a cook everything in huge Julia Child cook book. The stuff that happens to her during her "project" is hilarious and the stuff she has to cook up, well I give her props for that becuase I wouldn't even want to look at it let alone eat it. I would recommend this to anyone looking for something a little different and who enjoys cooking.
Date published: 2009-01-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Cooking your way to happiness... Julie Powell had me at : “we both recognize the genius of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” That revelation comes early on in her book Julie & Julia, a memoir that builds upon the “Project” she embarked on just before she was about to turn 30. Disheartened with her life as a government drone in New York City, Powell was, as many of us were, looking for meaning in a post 9/11 world. But further to that- she was looking for meaning in her own life. Or at the very least, she was looking for something meaningful to do. While visiting her parents in her native Texas, Powell confiscates her mother’s copy of Mastering the Art of French Cooking (MtAoFC) by Julia Child. “Do you know Mastering the Art of French Cooking? You must, at least, know of it,” Powell says. “It’s a cultural landmark, for Pete’s sake!” And from this cookbook…and a conversation with Powell’s long-suffering (and incredibly supportive) husband, Eric, springs the Julie/Julia Project. Powell decides to cook every single recipe from the book and blog about it. (http://blogs.salon.com/0001399/2002/08/25.html) Blogging. Ahh, yes. Curious thing, that. You write and people read and the next thing you know you have a book deal. Or something like that. Julie & Julia follows Powell’s project from beginning to end- and includes everything from her failures in the kitchen to her friend’s extramarital affairs. It is laugh-out-loud funny and occasionally self-indulgent (but what blog isn’t?). It’s peppered with expletives and bits of strange insight. So this search for meaning (personal meaning, at least) has been done before. Elizabeth Gilbert (whom Powell thanks in her acknowledgments) did it in a little best-seller called Eat, Pray, Love. I liked Powell’s book better and here’s why… I could relate to Powell. And, no, it’s not just because of her Buffy-love (although that certainly earned her free points.) Where Gilbert took a year off to spend four months each in three different countries, Powell could only afford the occasional day of playing hooky from her crap job while she cooked her way to enlightenment. Her house was unkept, she drank too-much and swore even more. She didn’t set off on the Project for fame and glory- she wanted to find an essential piece of herself that she thought was missing. And she does…one recipe at a time. For fun, I'm including the recipe for the first dish Powell attempts. Potage Parmentier 1 lb potato, peeled and diced (I leave skins on) 3 cups of leeks, thinly sliced, white and tender green parts only 2 qts of water 4-6 tablespoons of whipping cream or 2-3 tablespoons of softened butter 2-3 tablespoons of minced parsley or chives Simmer vegetables, water and salt, partially covered, for 45 minutes or until vegetables are soft. Mash the vegetables in the soup with a fork or puree in blender. Correct seasoning. Off heat and just before serving, stir in cream or butter one spoonful at a time. Serve hot or cold.
Date published: 2008-10-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from disappointing This book is more of a cooking blog than anything else. Julie decides to cook all the recipes in the book Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child. Several of her endeavors are downright funny but most are just okay. Julie is slightly neurotic and episodes of making gelatins and not having them set are not worthy of fits. We have all had disasters in the kitchen. We just don't write about them. I would find it odd that someone wants to cook every recipe in a book but I myself like to try 3-4 new recipes every week. I can not imagine the effort required to work a full day and then come home and cook a gourmet meal. Julie said they were eating late but ... Also if I ate like that I would be an elephant not just gain a few pounds.
Date published: 2008-09-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Fabulous Read Julie Powell's year spent cooking dangerously was hysterical! I haven't laughed this hard in a long time. Julie, secretary by day, pseudo-chef by night, recounts her experience of cooking her way through Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking, simultaneously blogging her experience until the project takes on a life of it's own. Julie is so...likeable...you don't want the story to end. I wonder if her next book is going to be based on baking her way through Julia's part 2 - French baking - I really hope so. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2006-09-18

– More About This Product –

Julie and Julia: My Year Of Cooking Dangerously

by Julie Powell

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 400 pages, 6.75 × 4.12 × 1 in

Published: July 1, 2009

Publisher: Little, Brown And Company

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 031604251X

ISBN - 13: 9780316042512

About the Book

Powell needs something to break the monotony of her life. So, she invents a deranged assignment: She will take her mother's dog-eared copy of Julia Child's 1961 classic, "Mastering the Art of French Cooking," and cook all 524 recipes in the span of just one year.

From the Publisher

Julie & Julia, the bestselling memoir that''s "irresistible....A kind ofBridget JonesmeetsThe French Chef" (Philadelphia Inquirer), is now a major motion picture. Julie Powell, nearing thirty and trapped in a dead-end secretarial job, resolves to reclaim her life by cooking in the span of a single year, every one of the 524 recipes in Julia Child''s legendaryMastering the Art of French Cooking. Her unexpected reward: not just a newfound respect for calves'' livers and aspic, but a new life-lived with gusto. The film is written and directed by Nora Ephron and stars Amy Adams as Julie and Meryl Streep as Julia.

About the Author

After spending a long, long time working as a temp, Julie Powell now writes in her pajamas at her home in Queens, New York, and occasionally serves as a butcher''s apprentice.

Editorial Reviews

"A really good book."-Washington Post Book World
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