Penguin Classics Utopia

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Penguin Classics Utopia

by Thomas More
Foreword by Paul Turner
Translated by Paul Turner

Penguin UK (PB) | December 31, 2002 | Trade Paperback |

4.6667 out of 5 rating. 3 Reviews
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Revised introduction; new chronology and further reading
Translated with an Introduction by Paul Turner.

Format: Trade Paperback

Published: December 31, 2002

Publisher: Penguin UK (PB)

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0140449108

ISBN - 13: 9780140449105

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Penguin Classics Utopia

Penguin Classics Utopia

by Thomas More
Foreword by Paul Turner
Translated by Paul Turner

Format: Trade Paperback

Published: December 31, 2002

Publisher: Penguin UK (PB)

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0140449108

ISBN - 13: 9780140449105

From the Publisher

Revised introduction; new chronology and further reading
Translated with an Introduction by Paul Turner.

About the Author

Born in London, the son of a judge, More became an important statesman and scholar. He was also one of the most eminent humanists of the Renaissance. Educated at Oxford, More became an under-sheriff of London and, later, a member of Parliament. Under King Henry VIII he served as Treasurer of the Exchequer, speaker of the House of Commons, and, finally, Lord Chancellor. More is probably best known for his Utopia, which was written in Latin (then the language of literary and intellectual Europe). It was translated into English in 1551. As the first part of this small masterpiece indicates, when More was weighing the offer to be an adviser to Henry VIII he was well aware of the compromises, bitterness, and frustration that such an office involved. In the second part, More develops his famous utopia---a Greek word punning on the meanings "a good place" and "no place"---a religious, communistic society where the common ownership of goods, obligatory work for everyone, and the regular life of all before the eyes of all ensure that one's baser nature will remain under control. Inspired by Plato's (see Vols. 3 and 4) Republic, More's Utopia became in turn the urbane legacy of the humanistic movement (in which More's friends were most notably Erasmus (see Vol. 4), John Colet, and William Grocyn) to succeeding ages. More also wrote a history, Richard III, which, if arguably the first instance of modern historiography in its attention to character and its departure from chronicle, is al
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