The Peach Keeper: A Novel

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The Peach Keeper: A Novel

by Sarah Addison Allen

Random House Publishing Group | October 17, 2012 | Hardcover

The Peach Keeper: A Novel is rated 4 out of 5 by 2.
The New York Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Chased the Moon welcomes you to her newest locale: Walls of Water, North Carolina, where the secrets are thicker than the fog from the town’s famous waterfalls, and the stuff of superstition is just as real as you want it to be.

It’s the dubious distinction of thirty-year-old Willa Jackson to hail from a fine old Southern family of means that met with financial ruin generations ago. The Blue Ridge Madam—built by Willa’s great-great-grandfather during Walls of Water’s heyday, and once the town’s grandest home—has stood for years as a lonely monument to misfortune and scandal. And Willa herself has long strived to build a life beyond the brooding Jackson family shadow. No easy task in a town shaped by years of tradition and the well-marked boundaries of the haves and have-nots.

But Willa has lately learned that an old classmate—socialite do-gooder Paxton Osgood—of the very prominent Osgood family, has restored the Blue Ridge Madam to her former glory, with plans to open a top-flight inn. Maybe, at last, the troubled past can be laid to rest while something new and wonderful rises from its ashes. But what rises instead is a skeleton, found buried beneath the property’s lone peach tree, and certain to drag up dire consequences along with it.

For the bones—those of charismatic traveling salesman Tucker Devlin, who worked his dark charms on Walls of Water seventy-five years ago—are not all that lay hidden out of sight and mind. Long-kept secrets surrounding the troubling remains have also come to light, seemingly heralded by a spate of sudden strange occurrences throughout the town.

Now, thrust together in an unlikely friendship, united by a full-blooded mystery, Willa and Paxton must confront the dangerous passions and tragic betrayals that once bound their families—and uncover truths of the long-dead that have transcended time and defied the grave to touch the hearts and souls of the living.

Resonant with insight into the deep and lasting power of friendship, love, and tradition, The Peach Keeper is a portrait of the unshakable bonds that—in good times and bad, from one generation to the next—endure forever.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 288 pages, 8.55 × 5.73 × 1.04 in

Published: October 17, 2012

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0553807226

ISBN - 13: 9780553807226

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Peach Keeper I first fell in love with Sarah Addison Allen’s writing style when I read The Girl Who Chased the Moon, and The Peach Keeper did not disappoint me in the least. She has a lovely way of weaving together a story of magic, mystery, and emotion. Her descriptions are so vivid and unique, and they are my absolute favourite part of her writing. “She stood there for a moment, stunned. Just as she was about to turn, she caught a whiff of something sweet. She inhaled deeply, instinctively wanting to savor it, but then she nearly choked when it landed on her tongue with a bitter taste… That, her grandmother had described to her once after making a particularly bad lemon cream pie, was exactly what regret tasted like.“ I love how the magical elements in Allen’s writing are always subtle and just enough to bring a little lightness to her stories but not enough to be overpowering. That being said I do think that in The Peach Keeper there was room for a little more development of the magical elements. Ie. further explanation about the peaches, and the scents of regret etc. I found there to be a lot less magical realism present in this book than in The Girl Who Chased the Moon, and that was one aspect of Allen’s writing style that I fell in love with. I really enjoyed the characters in this book as well as their relationships. I found the relationship that Willa and Paxton each had with their grandmothers to be so interesting and I loved how their own relationship grew as a result. I appreciated the theme of female solidarity and was happy that this idea of leaning on your friends wasn’t overdone in a nauseating “girl power” kind of way. The way Paxton’s friendships with her married friends changed and grew apart over the years was extremely realistic and I really could identify with that aspect of this story. I wish that it was longer as I wasn’t ready for the story to end! Allen is quickly becoming my favourite author and I highly recommend the Peach Keeper for anyone looking for a light and happy read with a touch of magic and mystery!
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read I really liked this book, the story was good and fast-paced. I was suprised at how fast I went through it. I'm thinking I may have to read the author's other books now as well. This book should be on your list of ones to read.
Date published: 2013-10-29

– More About This Product –

The Peach Keeper: A Novel

by Sarah Addison Allen

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 288 pages, 8.55 × 5.73 × 1.04 in

Published: October 17, 2012

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0553807226

ISBN - 13: 9780553807226

Read from the Book

Hiding Places The day Paxton Osgood took the box of heavy-stock, foil-lined envelopes to the post office, the ones she''d had a professional calligrapher address, it began to rain so hard the air turned as white as bleached cotton. By nightfall, rivers had crested at flood stage and, for the first time since 1936, the mail couldn''t be delivered. When things began to dry out, when basements were pumped free of water and branches were cleared from yards and streets, the invitations were finally delivered, but to all the wrong houses. Neighbors laughed over fences, handing the misdelivered pieces of mail to their rightful owners with comments about the crazy weather and their careless postman. The next day, an unusual number of people showed up at the doctor''s office with infected paper cuts, because the envelopes had sealed, cementlike, from the moisture. Later, the single-card invitations themselves seemed to hide and pop back up at random. Mrs. Jameson''s invitation disappeared for two days, then reappeared in a bird''s nest outside. Harper Rowley''s invitation was found in the church bell tower, Mr. Kingsley''s in his elderly mother''s garden shed. If anyone had been paying attention to the signs, they would have realized that air turns white when things are about to change, that paper cuts mean there''s more to what''s written on the page than meets the eye, and that birds are always out to protect you from things you don''t see. But no one was paying attention. Least of
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From the Publisher

The New York Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Chased the Moon welcomes you to her newest locale: Walls of Water, North Carolina, where the secrets are thicker than the fog from the town’s famous waterfalls, and the stuff of superstition is just as real as you want it to be.

It’s the dubious distinction of thirty-year-old Willa Jackson to hail from a fine old Southern family of means that met with financial ruin generations ago. The Blue Ridge Madam—built by Willa’s great-great-grandfather during Walls of Water’s heyday, and once the town’s grandest home—has stood for years as a lonely monument to misfortune and scandal. And Willa herself has long strived to build a life beyond the brooding Jackson family shadow. No easy task in a town shaped by years of tradition and the well-marked boundaries of the haves and have-nots.

But Willa has lately learned that an old classmate—socialite do-gooder Paxton Osgood—of the very prominent Osgood family, has restored the Blue Ridge Madam to her former glory, with plans to open a top-flight inn. Maybe, at last, the troubled past can be laid to rest while something new and wonderful rises from its ashes. But what rises instead is a skeleton, found buried beneath the property’s lone peach tree, and certain to drag up dire consequences along with it.

For the bones—those of charismatic traveling salesman Tucker Devlin, who worked his dark charms on Walls of Water seventy-five years ago—are not all that lay hidden out of sight and mind. Long-kept secrets surrounding the troubling remains have also come to light, seemingly heralded by a spate of sudden strange occurrences throughout the town.

Now, thrust together in an unlikely friendship, united by a full-blooded mystery, Willa and Paxton must confront the dangerous passions and tragic betrayals that once bound their families—and uncover truths of the long-dead that have transcended time and defied the grave to touch the hearts and souls of the living.

Resonant with insight into the deep and lasting power of friendship, love, and tradition, The Peach Keeper is a portrait of the unshakable bonds that—in good times and bad, from one generation to the next—endure forever.

About the Author

Sarah Addison Allen is the author of The Girl Who Chased the Moon, Garden Spells, and The Sugar Queen. She was born and raised in Asheville, North Carolina.

Editorial Reviews

Praise for  The Peach Keeper

Allen juggles smalltown history and mystical thriller, character development and eerie magical realism in a fine Southern gothic drama. The underlying tension will please and unnerve readers, as well as leave them eager for Allen''s next.
-Publisher''s Weekly


Praise for Sarah Addison Allen’s The Girl Who Chased the Moon

 
“Captivating . . . Sarah Addison Allen produces tantalizing fiction.”—The Roanoke Times
 
“A dusting of magic, the aroma of sugary cakes swirling through the breeze, and a girl who unwittingly brings change to a town of misfits make for a sweet summer story filled with hope and forgiveness.”—Beth Hoffman, author of Saving CeeCee Honeycutt
 
“Charming and entertaining . . . Don’t miss this spellbinding tale.”—Asheville Citizen Times
 
“Allen clearly knows that all the fun is in the journey. . . . Sit back, open this book and join her.”—Greensboro News & Record
 

“An enjoyable read [with] doses of magical realism and romance.”—Associated Press

“Easy to devour in one sitting.” —The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Bookclub Guide

1. What do you think the title The Peach Keeper means?  Who is the peach keeper in the story?
 
2.  Superstitions played a big part in Willa''s grandmother''s life, and in Willa''s life, by extension.  What superstitions did you grow up with?  Why do you think superstitions exist? 
 
3.  Several of the characters in The Peach Keeper struggle with how people used to see them as opposed to who they are now.  Who were you in high school?  Do you miss that person?  Or are you glad to leave that time in your life behind? 
 
4. Willa spent her formative years as The Joker, acting out and sparking controversy that she wouldn''t become aware of until she was an adult.  What do you make of her past actions?  How does it connect to the way she acts in the novel? How does it affect her relationships as an adult?
 
5.  The characters in The Peach Keeper live in an extraordinarily beautiful area, one surrounded by waterfalls.  Yet Willa once remarks, "When you see it every day, sometimes you wonder what the big deal is."  Do you think you get so used to beauty that you stop seeing it?  What are some natural wonders in your area?  Does Willa''s comment also refer to people?
 
6. The Blue Ridge Madam takes on a life of its own in the novel, becoming much more than a building.  What do you think it represents for the town? For Willa and Paxton?
 
7.  There''s a wisp of something supernatural following the characters in the story, seemingly brought into their lives by the discovery of buried bones under a peach tree.  What are your thoughts on the supernatural?  Do you think disturbing a grave upsets the spiritual side of things?  Have you ever had a paranormal experience?
 
8.  One of the prevailing themes in The Peach Keeper is friendship.  Agatha and Georgie are elderly, and have been friends all their lives.  Paxton and Willa have a newly formed friendship.  The book posits that friendship is "a living breathing thing, something that comes to life the moment it happens and doesn''t just go away when it''s no longer acknowledged."  If there is no big break-up, just a gradual separation, do you think the friendship still exists?  Do you think once you are a friend, are you always a friend?  Have you ever reconnected with an old friend and found that you still share a bond with them?
 
9.  Sarah Addison Allen''s books usually have themes of forgiveness and food.  Have you read Sarah''s other books?  How is The Peach Keeper similar?  How is it a departure?  Did you recognize the reference to the main characters in her debut novel, Garden Spells?
 
10.  Paxton, Willa, and even Willa''s father, deal with parental expectation.  Do you think that who we become in life is due in part to what our parents wanted us to be, or who are parents were?  If you have children, how do they fit the pattern?
 
11.  How do you take your coffee?  Do you think that says something about you?  Do you believe, like Rachel, that how someone takes their coffee says something about their personality?
 
12. What do you think of Paxton and Sebastian''s relationship, and how it evolves over the course of the novel?  Have you ever had a similar relationship in your life? How do you feel it fed into the overall themes of The Peach Keeper? 
 
13. Willa and Colin have a complicated relationship from the start - what do you think is the strongest force pulling them together?  Do you think their relationship would have worked had they met in another time and place?
 
14. In the end, Agatha keeps a secret she promised to keep seventy-five years ago. In this information age, we are not a private society.  How hard is it to keep secrets?  Would you be capable of keeping a secret that long?
 
15. The theme of roots runs through the novel - from the peach tree, to Colin''s work, to the characters struggling with their place in Walls of Water.  What about the town and its history draws people to it and entices them to put down roots?  On the flip side, what about it causes others to deny their roots and move away?  Have you had a similar experience with your home town?
 

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