The Weekend: A Novel

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

The Weekend: A Novel

by Bernhard Schlink

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group | October 30, 2012 | Hardcover

Not yet rated | write a review
Old friends and lovers reunite for a weekend in a secluded country home after spending decades apart.
 
They excavate old memories and pass clandestine judgments on the wildly divergent paths they’ve taken since their youth. But this isn’t just any reunion, and their conversations about the old days aren’t your typical reminiscences: After twenty-four years, Jörg, a convicted murderer and terrorist, has been released from prison. The announcement of his pardon will send shock waves through the country, but before the announcement, his friends—some of whom were Baader-Meinhof sympathizers or those who clung to them—gather for his first weekend of freedom. They have been summoned by Jörg’s devoted sister, Christiane, whose concern for her brother’s safety is matched only by the unrelenting zeal of Marko, a young man intent on having Jörg continue to fight for the cause.
 
Bernhard Schlink is at his finest as The Weekend unfolds. Passions are pitted against pragmatism, ideas against actions, and hopes against heartbreaking realities.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 224 pages, 3.07 × 2.07 × 0.38 in

Published: October 30, 2012

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0307378152

ISBN - 13: 9780307378156

Found in: Fiction and Literature

save 96%

  • Out of stock online

$1.00  ea

Online Price

$27.95 List Price

Cart

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Reviews

– More About This Product –

The Weekend: A Novel

by Bernhard Schlink

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 224 pages, 3.07 × 2.07 × 0.38 in

Published: October 30, 2012

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0307378152

ISBN - 13: 9780307378156

About the Book

After 24 years, Jorg, a convicted murderer and terrorist, has been released from prison. The announcement of his pardon sends shock waves throughout the country, but before the announcement, his friends gather for his first weekend of freedom.

Read from the Book

One   She got there just before seven. She’d expected to make more headway and arrive sooner by traveling in the early morning. When she hit more road construction, and yet more, she grew nervous. Would he walk through the gate, look out for her in vain, his first reac­tion one of disappointment, of discouragement? The sun rose in the rearview  mirror—she would rather have been driving  toward it than away from it, even if it had dazzled her.   She parked where she had always parked and walked the short path to the gate as slowly as she had always walked. Everything to do with her own life she cleared from her mind, to make room for him. He always had a firm place in her mind; not an hour passed without her wondering what he was doing right now, how he was getting on. But each time she met him, he alone existed for her. Now that his life was no longer in suspended animation, now that it was starting to move once more, he needed her full attention.   The old sandstone building stood in the sun. As so often before, she was strangely moved that a building should serve such an ugly purpose and at the same time be so beautiful: the walls covered with Virginia creeper, field and forest green in spring and summer, yellow and red in autumn, the small towers on the corners and the large one in the middle, its windows like those of a church, the heavy gate, forbidding, as if it wished not to shut the inhabitants in but to shut
read more read less

From the Publisher

Old friends and lovers reunite for a weekend in a secluded country home after spending decades apart.
 
They excavate old memories and pass clandestine judgments on the wildly divergent paths they’ve taken since their youth. But this isn’t just any reunion, and their conversations about the old days aren’t your typical reminiscences: After twenty-four years, Jörg, a convicted murderer and terrorist, has been released from prison. The announcement of his pardon will send shock waves through the country, but before the announcement, his friends—some of whom were Baader-Meinhof sympathizers or those who clung to them—gather for his first weekend of freedom. They have been summoned by Jörg’s devoted sister, Christiane, whose concern for her brother’s safety is matched only by the unrelenting zeal of Marko, a young man intent on having Jörg continue to fight for the cause.
 
Bernhard Schlink is at his finest as The Weekend unfolds. Passions are pitted against pragmatism, ideas against actions, and hopes against heartbreaking realities.

About the Author

Bernhard Schlink is the author of the internationally best-selling novel The Reader, which was an Oprah’s Book Club selection. He divides his time between Berlin and New York.

Editorial Reviews

Praise for The Weekend
“Schlink avoids the easy route of condemnation and salvation . . . The book’s real strength is the finely wrought dynamic among the characters, whose relationships and histories are fraught with a powerful sense of tension and possibly untoward potential.”
—Publishers Weekly

Praise for The Reader
“Arresting, philosophically elegant, morally complex . . . Schlink tells this story with marvelous directness and simplicity, his writing stripped bare of any of the standard gimmicks of dramatization.”
 —The New York Times
 
“[A] beautiful, disturbing, and finally morally devastating novel. From the first page, The Reader ensnares both heart and mind.”
 —Los Angeles Times
 
Praise for Homecoming
“A beguilingly oblique novel . . . Despite its intricate, mazelike progression, Homecoming has surprising narrative thrust.”
 —The Economist
 
“Sensitive and disturbing . . . The reader’s mind opens to the story like a plant unfurling its leaves to the sun.”
 —The New York Times Book Review
 
Praise for Flights of Love
“An outstanding collection.”
 —The Wall Street Journal
 
“Intimate, smart, powerful . . . As memorable as The Reader . . . Dazzling.”
 —The Washington Post Book World

Bookclub Guide

Bernhard Schlink is the author of the internationally best-selling novel The Reader, which was an Oprah’s Book Club selection. He divides his time between Berlin and New York.



1. The book opens with Christiane picking Jörg up from the prison entrance.  His sister has visited him every two weeks for the last twenty-four years, yet their first meeting is tense and restrained. Do you think Jörg is concerned about the way people are going to see him, or is it simply dealing with the feeling of freedom?

2. Although there are others present when Henner arrives at the estate, he is the first of Jörg’s friends to be introduced.  Do you think Henner’s profession as a journalist makes him more objective when looking at Jörg’s life?

3. During the first meal at which everyone is gathered, Ulrich is particularly harsh toward Jörg.  While everyone else is making polite conversation, Ulrich wants to know, “What was the worst thing about jail?” When people object to Ulrich’s questions, he defends himself by saying, “Why shouldn’t I ask him about his life? He chose it—just as you chose yours and I chose mine.” Do you think Ulrich is correct?  Do we have so much choice in life?

4. Ilse’s writings about Jan are a parallel plot to the main story.  She seems to be trying to grant herself closure by giving Jan’s life meaning. How do you feel about her suggesting Jan had something to do with 9/11, and still giving him an emancipating end?

5. Ulrich’s daughter, Dorle, makes a big scene near the beginning of the book, but she was not one of Jörg’s friends, and seems to completely change after her initial commotion. How does the character of Dorle fit with the rest of the characters, and why do you think the author included her?

6. Jörg’s son, Ferdinand, arrives late to the gathering.  He and his father haven’t been in contact, and Christiane says, “He’s become the person they brought up.” Yet Ferdinand does come for the weekend, despite his feelings about his father’s past.  Do you think Jörg and Ferdinand will have a relationship afterwards?

7. Christiane has had a relationship with Henner and Margarete, but her real love is for her brother.  Do you think Henner and Margarete are attracted to each other in spite of Christiane, or because of her? Has so much time passed for all of them that the past relationships don’t matter anymore?

8. Marko Hahn believes that Jörg can still live as a symbol to the revolutionary cause.  Christiane believes Jörg can change his life and become something separate from his past.  Andreas just wants to keep his friend out of public dealings.  Do you think any of these things are possible?

9. Karin, as the vicar, tries to keep peace among the parties, but even she is torn by memories of what the friends did in their youth in the name of revolution, of passion and belief in truth.  Is it moral responsibility that has changed their beliefs, or, as Marko claims, complacency in life?

10. Jörg claims that he doesn’t remember the murders he committed, and several of the others seem to have forgotten the details of what happened twenty-five years before.  Do you think it is possible to thoroughly block out the details of such terrible events?  Do you think, from the victim’s standpoint, it is acceptable to let them be forgotten?

11. It is revealed that Christiane was the one who led police to Jörg, because she wanted to protect him.  Marko seems more angry about this betrayal than Jörg himself.  What do you think about Christiane’s act?

12. Jörg claims he has paid enough for the murders, but his son disagrees. “You haven’t paid for what you did—you’ve forgiven yourself for it.  Presumably even before you did it.  But only the others can forgive you. And they don’t.”  Jörg killed in the name of the revolution, but his son sees the individuals that were affected.  Is killing in the name of truth ever acceptable?

13. What do you think of Jörg’s revelation at the end?  Do you feel sorry for him?  Do you think he has paid for what he has done?

14. Looking back at your own life, was there a cause that you felt passionately about that you barely remember now?  Why did you let that cause go?  How do you feel about it now?

15. How do you think the characters will be changed by the weekend? Who do you think will be most affected?

Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart