A Moveable Feast

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A Moveable Feast

by Ernest Hemingway

Scribner | May 29, 1996 | Trade Paperback

4.6667 out of 5 rating. 6 Reviews
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Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway''s most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 240 pages, 3.32 × 2.17 × 0.28 in

Published: May 29, 1996

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 068482499X

ISBN - 13: 9780684824994

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– More About This Product –

A Moveable Feast

by Ernest Hemingway

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 240 pages, 3.32 × 2.17 × 0.28 in

Published: May 29, 1996

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 068482499X

ISBN - 13: 9780684824994

Read from the Book

Chapter One Then there was the bad weather. It would come in one day when the fall was over. We would have to shut the windows in the night against the rain and the cold wind would strip the leaves from the trees in the Place Contrescarpe. The leaves lay sodden in the rain and the wind drove the rain against the big green autobus at the terminal and the Café des Amateurs was crowded and the windows misted over from the heat and the smoke inside. It was a sad, evilly run café where the drunkards of the quarter crowded together and I kept away from it because of the smell of dirty bodies and the sour smell of drunkenness. The men and women who frequented the Amateurs stayed drunk all of the time, or all of the time they could afford it, mostly on wine which they bought by the half-liter or liter. Many strangely named apéritifs were advertised, but few people could afford them except as a foundation to build their wine drunks on. The women drunkards were called poivrottes which meant female rummies. The Café des Amateurs was the cesspool of the rue Mouffetard, that wonderful narrow crowded market street which led into the Place Contrescarpe. The squat toilets of the old apartment houses, one by the side of the stairs on each floor with the two cleated cement shoe-shaped elevations on each side of the aperture so a locataire would not slip, emptied into cesspools which were emptied by pumping into horse-drawn tank wagons at night. In the summer time, with all
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Table of Contents

Contents

Preface

Note


A Good Café on the Place St.-Michel

Miss Stein Instructs

"Une Génération Perdue"

Shakespeare and Company

People of the Seine

A False Spring

The End of an Avocation

Hunger Was Good Discipline

Ford Madox Ford and the Devil''s Disciple

Birth of a New School

With Pascin at the Dôme

Ezra Pound and His Bel Esprit

A Strange Enough Ending

The Man Who Was Marked for Death

Evan Shipman at the Lilas

An Agent of Evil

Scott Fitzgerald

Hawks Do Not Share

A Matter of Measurements

There Is Never Any End to Paris

From the Publisher

Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway''s most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

About the Author

Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in the family home in Oak Park, Ill., on July 21, 1899. In high school, Hemingway enjoyed working on The Trapeze, his school newspaper, where he wrote his first articles. Upon graduation in the spring of 1917, Hemingway took a job as a cub reporter for the Kansas City Star. After a short stint in the U.S. Army as a volunteer Red Cross ambulance driver in Italy, Hemingway moved to Paris, and it was here that Hemingway began his well-documented career as a novelist. Hemingway's first collection of short stories and vignettes, entitled In Our Time, was published in 1925. His first major novel, The Sun Also Rises, the story of American and English expatriates in Paris and on excursion to Pamplona, immediately established him as one of the great prose stylists and preeminent writers of his time. In this book, Hemingway quotes Gertrude Stein, "You are all a lost generation," thereby labeling himself and other expatriate writers, including Scott Fitzgerald, T.S. Eliot, and Ford Madox Ford. Other novels written by Hemingway include: A Farewell To Arms, the story, based in part on Hemingway's life, of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse; For Whom the Bell Tolls, the story of an American who fought, loved, and died with the guerrillas in the mountains of Spain; and To Have and Have Not, about an honest man forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West. Non-fiction includes Green Hill
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From Our Editors

This vibrant portrait of Paris in the 1920s, published posthumously in 1964, is vintage Hemingway--evocative, self-mocking and frank. In an extraordinary chronicle of the sights, sounds, and tastes of Paris in a bygone era, Hemingway offers readers a view of his life and the people that populated his expatriate world--Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound and other literary luminaries.

Editorial Reviews

"The first thing to say about the ''restored'' edition so ably and attractively produced by Patrick and Seán Hemingway is that it does live up to its billing . . . well worth having."--Christopher Hitchens, The Atlantic
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