Better to Have Loved: The Life of Judith Merril

by Emily Pohl-Weary, Judith Merril

Between the Lines | April 19, 2002 | Trade Paperback |

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Judith Merril was a pioneer of twentieth-century science fiction, a prolific author, and editor. She was also a passionate social and political activist. In fact, her life was a constant adventure within the alternative and experimental worlds of science fiction, left politics, and Canadian literature. Better to Have Loved is illustrated with original art works, covers from classic science fiction magazines, period illustrations, and striking photography.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 300 Pages, 7.09 × 8.66 × 0.39 in

Published: April 19, 2002

Publisher: Between the Lines

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1896357571

ISBN - 13: 9781896357577

Appropriate for ages: 16 - adult

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– More About This Product –

Better to Have Loved: The Life of Judith Merril

by Emily Pohl-Weary, Judith Merril

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 300 Pages, 7.09 × 8.66 × 0.39 in

Published: April 19, 2002

Publisher: Between the Lines

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1896357571

ISBN - 13: 9781896357577

About the Book

Judith Merril was a pioneer of twentieth-century science fiction, a prolific author, and editor. She was also a passionate social and political activist. In fact, her life was a constant adventure within the alternative and experimental worlds of science fiction, left politics, and Canadian literature.Better to Have Loved is illustrated with original art works, covers from classic science fiction magazines, period illustrations, and striking photography.

From the Publisher

Judith Merril was a pioneer of twentieth-century science fiction, a prolific author, and editor. She was also a passionate social and political activist. In fact, her life was a constant adventure within the alternative and experimental worlds of science fiction, left politics, and Canadian literature. Better to Have Loved is illustrated with original art works, covers from classic science fiction magazines, period illustrations, and striking photography.

About the Author

Emily Pohl-Weary is the granddaughter of Judith Merril. Quickly becoming a major figure in the indie culture world, Emily has excelled at finding success on her own terms. She co-edits Broken Pencil magazine as well as her own magazine called Kiss Machine. Her writing has appeared in Shift, Lola, Taddle Creek, Fireweed, This, and Now magazines. She is currently at work on her first novel Sugar''s Empty.

From the Author

"Her life story not only chronicles the birth of science fiction, but many of the important radical cultural and political movements spanning three-quarters of a century: the Depression, the Second World War, the McCarthy era, the Vietnam War, emerging feminism, and corporatization and globalization of the late twentieth century." Emily Pohl-Weary in conversation with Steve Izma STEVE IZMA : Who was Judith Merril? EMILY POHL-WEARY : Judith Merril was my grandmother -- a science fiction writer and editor, feminist, cultural theorist, and anti-war activist. She grew up among the Jewish intelligentsia in Boston and then moved to New York City to become a writer. Her mother, Ethel Grossman, was a suffragette, who ran the Bronx House, a halfway house for homeless kids. Judith believed that her mother raised her to be a man, to be intelligent, not pretty. She didn''t teach her how to use makeup, but rather how to engage people intellectually. Ethel wanted her to be a writer of great literature, just as her father, Shlomo Grossman, had been. Shlomo was a writer who translated the works of Sholem Aleichem and committed suicide during the Depression (Judith was seven) by jumping out the window of his publisher''s building. During the 1940s, 50s and 60s Judith wrote three novels, dozens of short stories, and edited twelve years of ?Best Of? anthologies, which acted catalytically and launched the careers of many important science fiction writers. England proclaimed her the American prop
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Appropriate for ages: 16 - adult

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