Cinema and Soviet Society, 1917-1953

by Peter Kenez

Cambridge University Press | June 26, 1992 | Hardcover |

Not yet rated | write a review
n this history of Soviet cinema Peter Kenez describes the pre-revolutionary heritage, the changes brought about by the Revolution, the great flourishing of the golden years of the late 1920s, the constraints imposed on artists in the name of Socialist realism, the relative liberalization during the years of the Second World War, and the extraordinary repression during the gloomy last years of Stalin. The author''s primary concern is the political uses of film. The Bolsheviks had high expectations: they believed that this medium would be a major vehicle for transmitting their social and political messages, and so experimented with the various ways with which they could bring movies to worker and peasant audiences. Although they achieved major successes, their unrealistically high expectations often led to disappointments and acrimonious debates. An examination of how the explicit and implicit messages in Soviet films changed over time helps us to understand the evolution of Soviet society. This study deals with the intersection of politics and culture and aims to illuminate both.In this history of Soviet cinema Peter Kenez describes the pre-revolutionary heritage, the changes brought about by the Revolution, the great flourishing of the golden years of the late 1920s, the constraints imposed on artists in the name of Socialist realism, the relative liberalization during the years of the Second World War, and the extraordinary repression during the gloomy last years of Stalin. The author''s primary concern is the political uses of film. The Bolsheviks had high expectations: they believed that this medium would be a major vehicle for transmitting their social and political messages, and so experimented with the various ways with which they could bring movies to worker and peasant audiences. Although they achieved major successes, their unrealistically high expectations often led to disappointments and acrimonious debates. An examination of how the explicit and implicit messages in Soviet films changed over time helps us to understand the evolution of Soviet society. This study deals with the intersection of politics and culture and aims to illuminate both.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 291 Pages, 5.91 × 8.66 × 0.79 in

Published: June 26, 1992

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 052141671X

ISBN - 13: 9780521416719

Found in: Current Events

Out of stock Sorry, this item has sold out and may be re-stocked in the future.

Cart

All available formats:

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Cinema and Soviet Society, 1917-1953

Cinema and Soviet Society, 1917-1953

by Peter Kenez

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 291 Pages, 5.91 × 8.66 × 0.79 in

Published: June 26, 1992

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 052141671X

ISBN - 13: 9780521416719

From the Publisher

n this history of Soviet cinema Peter Kenez describes the pre-revolutionary heritage, the changes brought about by the Revolution, the great flourishing of the golden years of the late 1920s, the constraints imposed on artists in the name of Socialist realism, the relative liberalization during the years of the Second World War, and the extraordinary repression during the gloomy last years of Stalin. The author''s primary concern is the political uses of film. The Bolsheviks had high expectations: they believed that this medium would be a major vehicle for transmitting their social and political messages, and so experimented with the various ways with which they could bring movies to worker and peasant audiences. Although they achieved major successes, their unrealistically high expectations often led to disappointments and acrimonious debates. An examination of how the explicit and implicit messages in Soviet films changed over time helps us to understand the evolution of Soviet society. This study deals with the intersection of politics and culture and aims to illuminate both.In this history of Soviet cinema Peter Kenez describes the pre-revolutionary heritage, the changes brought about by the Revolution, the great flourishing of the golden years of the late 1920s, the constraints imposed on artists in the name of Socialist realism, the relative liberalization during the years of the Second World War, and the extraordinary repression during the gloomy last years of Stalin. The author''s primary concern is the political uses of film. The Bolsheviks had high expectations: they believed that this medium would be a major vehicle for transmitting their social and political messages, and so experimented with the various ways with which they could bring movies to worker and peasant audiences. Although they achieved major successes, their unrealistically high expectations often led to disappointments and acrimonious debates. An examination of how the explicit and implicit messages in Soviet films changed over time helps us to understand the evolution of Soviet society. This study deals with the intersection of politics and culture and aims to illuminate both.
Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart