Culling The Masses: The Democratic Origins Of Racist Immigration Policy In The Americas

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

Culling The Masses: The Democratic Origins Of Racist Immigration Policy In The Americas

by David Cook-martín, David Scott Fitzgerald
Contribution by Angela S. García

Harvard | April 22, 2014 | Hardcover

Not yet rated | write a review

Culling the Masses" questions the widely held view that in the long run democracy and racism cannot coexist. David Scott FitzGerald and David Cook-Martin show that democracies were the first countries in the Americas to select immigrants by race, and undemocratic states the first to outlaw discrimination. Through analysis of legal records from twenty-two countries between 1790 and 2010, the authors present a history of the rise and fall of racial selection in the Western Hemisphere.

The United States led the way in using legal means to exclude "inferior" ethnic groups. Starting in 1790, Congress began passing nationality and immigration laws that prevented Africans and Asians from becoming citizens, on the grounds that they were inherently incapable of self-government. Similar policies were soon adopted by the self-governing colonies and dominions of the British Empire, eventually spreading across Latin America as well.

Undemocratic regimes in Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Cuba reversed their discriminatory laws in the 1930s and 1940s, decades ahead of the United States and Canada. The conventional claim that racism and democracy are antithetical--because democracy depends on ideals of equality and fairness, which are incompatible with the notion of racial inferiority--cannot explain why liberal democracies were leaders in promoting racist policies and laggards in eliminating them. Ultimately, the authors argue, the changed racial geopolitics of World War II and the Cold War was necessary to convince North American countries to reform their immigration and citizenship laws.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 512 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.03 in

Published: April 22, 2014

Publisher: Harvard

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0674729048

ISBN - 13: 9780674729049

save
37%

Ships within 3-5 weeks Not yet released

$38.24  ea

Online Price

$57.95 List Price

or, Used from $41.05

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Culling The Masses: The Democratic Origins Of Racist Immigration Policy In The Americas

by David Cook-martín, David Scott Fitzgerald
Contribution by Angela S. García

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 512 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.03 in

Published: April 22, 2014

Publisher: Harvard

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0674729048

ISBN - 13: 9780674729049

From the Publisher

Culling the Masses" questions the widely held view that in the long run democracy and racism cannot coexist. David Scott FitzGerald and David Cook-Martin show that democracies were the first countries in the Americas to select immigrants by race, and undemocratic states the first to outlaw discrimination. Through analysis of legal records from twenty-two countries between 1790 and 2010, the authors present a history of the rise and fall of racial selection in the Western Hemisphere.

The United States led the way in using legal means to exclude "inferior" ethnic groups. Starting in 1790, Congress began passing nationality and immigration laws that prevented Africans and Asians from becoming citizens, on the grounds that they were inherently incapable of self-government. Similar policies were soon adopted by the self-governing colonies and dominions of the British Empire, eventually spreading across Latin America as well.

Undemocratic regimes in Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Cuba reversed their discriminatory laws in the 1930s and 1940s, decades ahead of the United States and Canada. The conventional claim that racism and democracy are antithetical--because democracy depends on ideals of equality and fairness, which are incompatible with the notion of racial inferiority--cannot explain why liberal democracies were leaders in promoting racist policies and laggards in eliminating them. Ultimately, the authors argue, the changed racial geopolitics of World War II and the Cold War was necessary to convince North American countries to reform their immigration and citizenship laws.

Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart