Dictionary Of Italian Food And Drink

by John Mariani

Broadway Books | June 8, 1998 | Trade Paperback |

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Everybody does like Italian food.  But did you ever wonder what goes into an authentic rag¨ alla bolognese?  What''s the difference between tagliatelle and fettuccine?  Why won''t you find pasta primavera or veal parmesan on menus in Italy?  What makes a Super Tuscan wine "super"?  How did Italian dishes like spaghetti alla puttanesca (in the style of a whore), strezzopretti (a pasta shape meaning priest stranglers), and minni di Sant''Agata (breast-shaped cookies in honor of a martyred saint) get their names?

The answers to these and thousands of other questions can be found in this comprehensive, user-friendly reference book.  With the most up-to-date information on Italian culinary terms, The Dictionary of Italian Food and Drink is the reliable resource for authentic definitions, classic recipes, correct spellings, proper pronunciations, and historical origins.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 320 Pages, 5.91 × 9.06 × 0.79 in

Published: June 8, 1998

Publisher: Broadway Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0767901290

ISBN - 13: 9780767901291

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– More About This Product –

Dictionary Of Italian Food And Drink

by John Mariani

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 320 Pages, 5.91 × 9.06 × 0.79 in

Published: June 8, 1998

Publisher: Broadway Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0767901290

ISBN - 13: 9780767901291

Read from the Book

The task of making sense of Italian food and drink in all its diversity might seem impossible, and as one who has traveled for over thirty years in Italy, I am still amazed and delighted at the number of unfamiliar local delicacies and specialties I still find every time I go. But I have also found that despite having a different name and perhaps a slightly different seasoning, many dishes share a common taste and technique of preparation. And many dishes are only slight variations on a dish made more or less the same way in three neighboring regions. While it would be impossible to list, for instance, every local variation on braised hare (lepre), I have tried in this volume to note enough variations that are either significantly different from others or seem wholly unique to a region. In the case of "classic" dishes such as ossobuco, saltimbocca, and trenette al pesto, I have endeavored to obtain a recipe that most reasonable Italian cooks would agree on as being authoritative. In the case of dishes that were created in specific kitchens, especially those popularized since World War II, like carpaccio, tiramis¨ and fettuccine all''Alfredo, I have gone as much as possible to the original source for the recipe. I claim absolutely no originality on my part for any recipe in this book, for creating something new would be antithetical to the aim of this book. I have pored over scores of regional Italian cookbooks in order to determine which dishes are truly indige
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From the Publisher

Everybody does like Italian food.  But did you ever wonder what goes into an authentic rag¨ alla bolognese?  What''s the difference between tagliatelle and fettuccine?  Why won''t you find pasta primavera or veal parmesan on menus in Italy?  What makes a Super Tuscan wine "super"?  How did Italian dishes like spaghetti alla puttanesca (in the style of a whore), strezzopretti (a pasta shape meaning priest stranglers), and minni di Sant''Agata (breast-shaped cookies in honor of a martyred saint) get their names?

The answers to these and thousands of other questions can be found in this comprehensive, user-friendly reference book.  With the most up-to-date information on Italian culinary terms, The Dictionary of Italian Food and Drink is the reliable resource for authentic definitions, classic recipes, correct spellings, proper pronunciations, and historical origins.

From the Jacket

Everybody does like Italian food. But did you ever wonder what goes into an authentic rag] alla bolognese? What''s the difference between tagliatelle and fettuccine? Why won''t you find pasta primavera or veal parmesan on menus in Italy? What makes a Super Tuscan wine "super"? How did Italian dishes like spaghetti alla puttanesca (in the style of a whore), strezzopretti (a pasta shape meaning priest stranglers), and minni di Sant''Agata (breast-shaped cookies in honor of a martyred saint) get their names?
The answers to these and thousands of other questions can be found in this comprehensive, user-friendly reference book. With the most up-to-date information on Italian culinary terms, "The Dictionary of Italian Food and Drink is the reliable resource for authentic definitions, classic recipes, correct spellings, proper pronunciations, and historical origins.

About the Author

John Mariani is the author of several culinary reference books including The Dictionary of American Food & Drink, which was named Best Reference Book of the Year (Library Journal) and America Eats Out (IACP/Julia Child Award).  He writes on food and drink for Esquire, Eating Well, Wine Spectator, Diversion, and many other magazines.

From Our Editors

This first totally comprehensive, user-friendly guide to Italian food documents Italian wines, desserts, antipasti, breads, sauces, and more than 200 kinds of pastas, and distinguishes authentic Italian cuisine from Italian-American fare. Includes 2,300 definitions and 50 classic recipes
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