Dr. Sigmundus: The Hollow People

by Brian Keaney

Random House Children's Books | September 25, 2007 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

Dr. Sigmundus: The Hollow People is rated 4 out of 5 by 6.
ON THE SINISTER ISLAND where strict obedience to the laws of the mysterious Dr. Sigmundus holds sway, dreaming will get you locked up and branded a lunatic, a danger to society and to all who know you. In this doomed and repressive place, two teens that were never meant to meet or share their dreams, cross paths and set in motion that which rips them from the lives they were meant to lead. Together they join forces with a ragtag group of rebel forces bent on breaking the grip of lies and illusions their countrymen have accepted without question.

For fans of thoughtful science fiction and fantasy, The Hollow People opens a window on the unseen worlds that surround us. It is the first installment in The Promises of Dr. Sigmundus. Book II will continue the tale in fall 2008.


From the Hardcover edition.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: September 25, 2007

Publisher: Random House Children's Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0375890823

ISBN - 13: 9780375890826

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from An amazing mesh of dystopia and the paranormal In The Hollow People, the first instalment of The Promises of Dr. Sigmundus, it follows the story of Dante, a lowly kitchen boy. Brian Keany, the author, reveals that he was influenced by Dante Alighieri?s ?Divine Comedy.? The similarity from the epic poem to the novel is the characters Dante and Beatrice, Dante?s ideal woman. In the novel, on one faithful day, Dante meets Beatrice Argenti. She has a secret. She can dream. But her days are numbered as her coming-of-age ceremony slowly approaches. Dante admits that he also has a secret. He has been given Ichor, yet it has no affect on him. He dreams too. One day, a prisoner brought to the island makes the people of Tarnagnar nervous and fearful. The prisoner?s name is Ezekiel. He tells Dante that everything he knows is a lie. With the help of Dante?s new friend Bea, they set out to find out answers about Dante?s mother, the Ruin City (the place Bea has repeatedly dreamed about), and most of all, Dr. Sigmundus. Complete Review: http://feistylittlewoman.wordpress.com/2011/12/30/review-the-hollow-people/
Date published: 2014-07-15
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not what I expected, but it was okay. Either take it or leave it. When I first picked up this book I thought it was from the paranormal genre. Then I took a closer look and it was an interesting blend of dystopia with some paranormal characteristics. I really did enjoy the dystopia aspect of the book. Dreams are taboo and you’re sent to the asylum if you have one and talk about it. It was an interesting idea and concept. However the pace was a little slow for me and it took me longer than usual to finish this book (despite its short length). The theme and setting certainly had a good dark tone to it. It’s set in an asylum for the most part and when an extremely ‘dangerous’ inmate arrives that’s all the excitement that happens in the asylum. The mystery surrounding Dante and his past was good and connections were slowly being revealed. I really did like Dante as a character and the story does surround on his development as a character. Bea is more like a female sidekick to the story and although she has her own story arc as well it’s not as interesting as Dante’s. Towards the ending of the book it got more interesting, except for a certain sequence where after re-reading the passage for about 3 times I’m still wondering what in the world happened. The cliffhanger though was very good and it does entice the reader to go search for the second one. I’m not sure if I’m going to pursue this series further. Although interesting and different when it comes to dystopian novels out there, the pace was just too slow for me and it just got a little too strange at the end. Plus, the cover is very very deceiving. You would expect to get a gothic horror novel but end with a dystopian world where dreams are illegal. Not a bad trade off, but with a slow start and slow moving pace this might deter readers (or not). So, I’m not sure if I would recommend this book to others as I did not enjoy it as much as I wanted to. I would say pick this up if you want to read something that’s a little different from the rest of the dystopian novels out there. Otherwise, take it or leave it.
Date published: 2011-03-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Creepy Dystopia Reason for Reading: I love dystopian fiction and books that are set in asylums; this fitting both descriptions was a must read. Tarnegar, is an island community that houses the insane from the rest of the population in this country where dreaming is forbidden, adults (14 and over) take a drug to make them stop dreaming and comply quietly to any authoritative figures. Questioning the wisdom of any part of this society could have you banded a lunatic and thrown into the asylum. Dante is an orphan whose mother was a lunatic and killed herself by jumping off the roof of the asylum. He now works as a kitchen boy, but the drug has never taken away his dreams. Bea Argenti is a middle-class girl, daughter of two junior doctors, who will be turning 14 soon but questions the use of the drug and does not want her dreams to go away as she has been dreaming for a long time about a strange ruined city. The two meet and start to figure out that their society is based on lies and perhaps the time has come for someone to stand up for the truth. I loved this dystopian novel! The idea of controlling society with drugs has been done many times before, perhaps starting with Brave New world, but it is a realistic thought-provoking idea that is not beyond the realms of possibility. Dante is a wonderful character and I liked him from the beginning; his background and character are fleshed out as the story progresses. This is definitely his story. Bea on the other hand has not been as fully developed, and she felt more like a sidekick, a female element to satisfy the 'need' for one. Personally,l I don't think there is a need for a male/female partnership/relationship for a good story but perhaps she will have more of a point to the plot in the next book. I loved the asylum half of the story, very creepy! Then the story progresses far beyond that level, more character's are introduced and the plot takes on many more levels while remaining a very dark and atmospheric tale of a future controlled by a madman. There is a science fiction element to the story that at first seems more magical than scientific and I wondered where it was going. I like fantasy so that's not necessarily a bad thing, but the book did remain in the scientific world while having this quasi-science/magic element that had me stumped of whether the series was going to turn into fantasy. But at the end, the Author's Note qualifies that there really was, historically, a scientist who did many experiments in the field of the subject matter used in the story. This made me appreciate the story more when I had finished. I look forward to continuing the series but do hope that we see a return to the asylum at some point.
Date published: 2011-03-01
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Dystopian teen novel had good potential, but didn't achieve its potential I absolutely enjoyed the beginning of this book. The dystopian setting and fairly regular-person characters captured my interest quickly. The creepy setting and mysterious cast carried the novel most of the way through. Trouble set in when the main character, Dante started to access magical talents. The mysterious capabilities that were displayed by other characters and the setting itself were interesting and creepy, as they were unknown. Once Dante started to access these powers, I felt that the novel wandered from its delightful dystopian speculative fiction into hopeful, fantastic speculative fiction. Apparently the framework presented in the first half to support the rest of the series' concept was preferable to the ultimate goal. While I was disappointed, I did still enjoy this book, and the disappointment was not so ground shattering that it threw away the rest of the book. I just think that a different ending would have worked better with the beginning.
Date published: 2009-02-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Eerily myserious and action-packed In a futuristic world where dreams are prohibited and laws are strictly enforced, a violation of the law could mean death by torture. It is in this sinister society in which two unfortunate teens, Bea Argenti and Dante Cazabon, find themselves subject to this harsh punishment for their curiosity and questioning of the unknown elements in their society. The two social outcasts, once total strangers soon find their paths intertwining, as readers are taken on a magnificently thrilling journey through the stunningly real but unknown world that surrounds us. The first installment in the trilogy of The Promises of Dr. Sigmundus, The Hollow People is a shocking portrayal of life outside the bounds of which we know, and the power of dreams, the mind, lies, and illusions to grip and change our world. An eerily mysterious, action-packed adventure, The Hollow People is a must-read for everyone. This original story left me eagerly anticipating the next installment in the series, giving me no choice but to award this book 5 out of 5 stars.
Date published: 2007-08-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Eerily myserious and action-packed In a futuristic world where dreams are prohibited and laws are strictly enforced, a violation of the law could mean death by torture. It is in this sinister society in which two unfortunate teens, Bea Argenti and Dante Cazabon, find themselves subject to this harsh punishment for their curiosity and questioning of the unknown elements in their society. The two social outcasts, once total strangers soon find their paths intertwining, as readers are taken on a magnificently thrilling journey through the stunningly real but unknown world that surrounds us. The first installment in the trilogy of The Promises of Dr. Sigmundus, The Hollow People is a shocking portrayal of life outside the bounds of which we know, and the power of dreams, the mind, lies, and illusions to grip and change our world. An eerily mysterious, action-packed adventure, The Hollow People is a must-read for everyone. This original story left me eagerly anticipating the next installment in the series, giving me no choice but to award this book 5 out of 5 stars.
Date published: 2007-08-04

– More About This Product –

Dr. Sigmundus: The Hollow People

by Brian Keaney

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: September 25, 2007

Publisher: Random House Children's Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0375890823

ISBN - 13: 9780375890826

From the Publisher

ON THE SINISTER ISLAND where strict obedience to the laws of the mysterious Dr. Sigmundus holds sway, dreaming will get you locked up and branded a lunatic, a danger to society and to all who know you. In this doomed and repressive place, two teens that were never meant to meet or share their dreams, cross paths and set in motion that which rips them from the lives they were meant to lead. Together they join forces with a ragtag group of rebel forces bent on breaking the grip of lies and illusions their countrymen have accepted without question.

For fans of thoughtful science fiction and fantasy, The Hollow People opens a window on the unseen worlds that surround us. It is the first installment in The Promises of Dr. Sigmundus. Book II will continue the tale in fall 2008.


From the Hardcover edition.

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

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