Dubliners: Part 1

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Dubliners: Part 1

by James Joyce

Naxos Audiobooks | May 15, 1999 | CD Abridged |

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This volume contains the first ten stories from the Dubliners collection: The Sisters, An Encounter, Araby, Eveline, After the Race, Two Gallants, The Boarding House, A Little Cloud, Counterparts, and Clay.

Format: CD Abridged

Dimensions: 5.51 × 4.72 × 0.79 in

Published: May 15, 1999

Publisher: Naxos Audiobooks

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 9626341734

ISBN - 13: 9789626341735

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Dubliners: Part 1

Dubliners: Part 1

by James Joyce

Format: CD Abridged

Dimensions: 5.51 × 4.72 × 0.79 in

Published: May 15, 1999

Publisher: Naxos Audiobooks

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 9626341734

ISBN - 13: 9789626341735

From the Publisher

This volume contains the first ten stories from the Dubliners collection: The Sisters, An Encounter, Araby, Eveline, After the Race, Two Gallants, The Boarding House, A Little Cloud, Counterparts, and Clay.

About the Author

For many critics, James Joyce is the most important novelist of the twentieth century. He perfected the stream-of-consciousness monologue; emerged as the most inventive of the experimental novelists; was a polyglot who could pun in a dozen languages; and antagonized his friends because of his egoism, yet could write about characters unlike himself with great compassion. Joyce's life was filled with contrasts: He abandoned his home to become an artist and spent his life in exile writing about the city he had abandoned. He was thought of as a great writer by people who had read little of his work, for his books were banned in English-speaking countries. Though Ulysses (1922) was suppressed for its supposed obscenity, few books stress the virtues of family life as strongly. In Joyce's early works, the innovative techniques are always subtle, concealed beneath a plain, seemingly conventional story. In his later works, this is no longer true. The reader is immediately aware of the experimental techniques; the prose may seem strange or unusual; and very often the story is difficult or impossible to discern. Ulysses is such a work---a novel with many strata of meaning. On one level, the book tells of the need Stephen Daedalus has for a father, of Leopold Bloom's yearning for a son, and of how the two meet.. On another level, Stephen is Telemachus, Bloom is Odysseus, and their story is a modern "odyssey." But here, again, irony is important, for it is in the way that Bloom is not Ody
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