Early Home Computers

by Kevin Murrell

Osprey Publishing | February 19, 2013 | Trade Paperback

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This is the story of the people and machines that revolutionized our lives and made personal computers an integral part of our homes. For the typical family in the 1960s and 1970s, computers were both fascinating and frightening, but largely a mystery. Developments in microelectronics in the early 1970s meant that computers at home seemed about to become commonplace: the kitchen computer would hold all of the family''s recipes and keep a record of food in the larder, the study computer would manage the family finances, and the kids'' computers would educate and entertain them. Engineers, enthusiasts and budding entrepreneurs set about making home computers a reality, and although the first machines were extremely limited, later machines would indeed begin to revolutionize our lives at home, at school, and at work.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 48 pages, 8.25 × 5.9 × 0.21 in

Published: February 19, 2013

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0747812160

ISBN - 13: 9780747812166

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– More About This Product –

Early Home Computers

by Kevin Murrell

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 48 pages, 8.25 × 5.9 × 0.21 in

Published: February 19, 2013

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0747812160

ISBN - 13: 9780747812166

Read from the Book

Introduction   For most people in the late 1960s and early 1970s, home entertainment was limited to television and the wireless. The wireless receiver had been the centrepiece of the living room and, newspapers and newsreels aside, it was the main source of information and entertainment in the home in the 1950s. Television began to supplant wireless in the 1960s; although it had been invented some time earlier, regular colour television transmissions did not begin in the UK until 1967 – some ten years later than in the US. Initially, colour televisions were prohibitively expensive, but as prices fell, they replaced almost all monochrome receivers by the mid-1970s.   Hi-fi systems were increasingly popular in the home, and many enthusiasts built their own – the same enthusiasts who were also building ham radio receivers and wireless sets at home. Bought music was limited to long-playing vinyl records and the cheaper ‘45’. Some audiophiles were using reel-to-reel tape recorders to record wireless programmes, but it was the arrival of the cheap compact cassette that allowed young people especially to record music from the radio and share it with friends. If they were considered at all by the average person, computers were thought to be impressive, mysterious, awe-inspiring and frightening in equal measure. Press coverage of the time typically described new computers as ‘electronic brains’ and they were often depicted as cartoon machi
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Table of Contents

Introduction
The Coming of the Microchip
Entrepreneurs, Engineers and Enthusiasts
Practical Home Computers
IBM and Apple Set the Standard
Games, Modems, and the Compact Disc
Conclusion
Further Reading
Places to Visit
Index

From the Publisher

This is the story of the people and machines that revolutionized our lives and made personal computers an integral part of our homes. For the typical family in the 1960s and 1970s, computers were both fascinating and frightening, but largely a mystery. Developments in microelectronics in the early 1970s meant that computers at home seemed about to become commonplace: the kitchen computer would hold all of the family''s recipes and keep a record of food in the larder, the study computer would manage the family finances, and the kids'' computers would educate and entertain them. Engineers, enthusiasts and budding entrepreneurs set about making home computers a reality, and although the first machines were extremely limited, later machines would indeed begin to revolutionize our lives at home, at school, and at work.

About the Author

Kevin Murrell is a trustee and Director of Britain''s National Museum of Computing, and Secretary of the Computer Conservation Society. He is the author of several lectures and articles for the Computer Conservation Society as well as contributing to Alan Turing and his Contemporaries (2012).
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