Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber, and Life with the Tree-Planting Tribe

by Charlotte Gill

Greystone Books | September 2, 2011 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber, and Life with the Tree-Planting Tribe is rated 4.5 out of 5 by 2.
Winner of the BC National Award for Non-Fiction
• Nominated for the Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction and the 2011 Hilary Weston Writer's Trust Award.

During Charlotte Gill’s 20 years working as a tree planter she encountered hundreds of clear-cuts, each one a collision site between human civilization and the natural world, a complicated landscape presenting geographic evidence of our appetites. Charged with sowing the new forest in these clear-cuts, tree planters are a tribe caught between the stumps and the virgin timber, between environmentalists and loggers.

In Eating Dirt, Gill offers up a slice of tree-planting life in all of its soggy, gritty exuberance while questioning the ability of conifer plantations to replace original forests, which evolved over millennia into intricate, complex ecosystems. Among other topics, she also touches on the boom-and-bust history of logging and the versatility of wood, from which we have devised countless creations as diverse as textiles and airplane parts. She also eloquently evokes the wonder of trees, our slowest-growing renewable” resource and joyously celebrates the priceless value of forests and the ancient, ever-changing relationship between humans and trees.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: September 2, 2011

Publisher: Greystone Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1553657934

ISBN - 13: 9781553657934

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fierce! Where poetry and Biology collide. A fierce little book for anyone who cares about our forests and the colourful vibrant characters who plant trees.
Date published: 2013-01-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Absolutely eye-opening First and foremost, thank you to Queen's University for sending me (and every other undergraduate of the class of 2016) a personalized copy of this book. I'll admit, when I saw the subtitle of this book, I thought it was going to have a "Use less toilet paper! Stop buying books! Recycle everything!" message. But this book is not preachy in the slightest. Not once did I feel as though the author was trying to change any opinions I may have about the environment or that she was *telling* me what the 'right thing to do' is. She opened my mind just by telling me her story. And the story of trees. Recommended for absolutely everyone. Even if you laugh at the concepts of global warming and recycling, or the idea that we're running out of resources, you will not be offended by this book.
Date published: 2012-07-16

– More About This Product –

Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber, and Life with the Tree-Planting Tribe

by Charlotte Gill

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: September 2, 2011

Publisher: Greystone Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1553657934

ISBN - 13: 9781553657934

From the Publisher

Winner of the BC National Award for Non-Fiction
• Nominated for the Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction and the 2011 Hilary Weston Writer's Trust Award.

During Charlotte Gill’s 20 years working as a tree planter she encountered hundreds of clear-cuts, each one a collision site between human civilization and the natural world, a complicated landscape presenting geographic evidence of our appetites. Charged with sowing the new forest in these clear-cuts, tree planters are a tribe caught between the stumps and the virgin timber, between environmentalists and loggers.

In Eating Dirt, Gill offers up a slice of tree-planting life in all of its soggy, gritty exuberance while questioning the ability of conifer plantations to replace original forests, which evolved over millennia into intricate, complex ecosystems. Among other topics, she also touches on the boom-and-bust history of logging and the versatility of wood, from which we have devised countless creations as diverse as textiles and airplane parts. She also eloquently evokes the wonder of trees, our slowest-growing renewable” resource and joyously celebrates the priceless value of forests and the ancient, ever-changing relationship between humans and trees.
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