Edward the Second: Christopher Marlowe

by Christopher Marlowe
Editor Charles R. Forker

Manchester University Press | October 15, 1995 | Trade Paperback |

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The introduction to this edition contains an analysis of the first quarto (including new evidence of its original dating) and a reconsideration of the play''s complex relation to the Shakespearean histories that preceded and followed it. Charles R. Forker offers a discussion of Marlowe''s use of sources, and presents a new argument for the drama''s five-act structure. He delves into the conflicting and controversial opinions concerning the genre and sexual politics of the play, and also includes a full record of the stage history. Forker has collated some 46 editions (including the important, rare and usually ignored editions of Broughton and Oxberry in 1818). The appendices provide substantive variants from the Broughton and Oxberry texts as well as extracts from the sources.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 384 Pages, 5.12 × 8.27 × 0.79 in

Published: October 15, 1995

Publisher: Manchester University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0719030897

ISBN - 13: 9780719030895

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Edward the Second: Christopher Marlowe

Edward the Second: Christopher Marlowe

by Christopher Marlowe
Editor Charles R. Forker

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 384 Pages, 5.12 × 8.27 × 0.79 in

Published: October 15, 1995

Publisher: Manchester University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0719030897

ISBN - 13: 9780719030895

About the Book

The introduction to this edition contains an analysis of the first quarto (including new evidence of its original dating) and a reconsideration of the play's complex relation to the Shakespearean histories that preceded and followed it. Charles R. Forker offers a discussion of Marlowe's use of sources, and presents a new argument for the drama's five-act structure. He delves into the conflicting and controversial opinions concerning the genre and sexual politics of the play, and also includes a full record of the stage history. Forker has collated some 46 editions (including the important, rare and usually ignored editions of Broughton and Oxberry in 1818). The appendices provide substantive variants from the Broughton and Oxberry texts as well as extracts from the sources.

From the Publisher

The introduction to this edition contains an analysis of the first quarto (including new evidence of its original dating) and a reconsideration of the play''s complex relation to the Shakespearean histories that preceded and followed it. Charles R. Forker offers a discussion of Marlowe''s use of sources, and presents a new argument for the drama''s five-act structure. He delves into the conflicting and controversial opinions concerning the genre and sexual politics of the play, and also includes a full record of the stage history. Forker has collated some 46 editions (including the important, rare and usually ignored editions of Broughton and Oxberry in 1818). The appendices provide substantive variants from the Broughton and Oxberry texts as well as extracts from the sources.

About the Author

Christopher Marlowe was born in Canterbury, England on February 6, 1564, the son of a shoemaker. He was educated at King's School, Canterbury and at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, where he received a B.A. in 1584 and an M.A. in 1587. His original plans for a religious career were put aside when he decided to become a writer. Marlowe's earliest work was translating Lucan and Ovid from Latin into English. He translated Vergil's Aeneid as a play; this innovation was not printed until after his death. Marlowe's "Tamburlaine the Great" was performed theatrically under primitive conditions. The sequel was presented more professionally in 1587 and "The Jew of Malta" followed soon after, to general acclaim, making him a dramatist of note. Marlowe's plays were produced by the Earl of Nottingham's Company. While Christopher Marlowe's literary life was flowering, his personal life was in an uproar. In 1589, he and a friend killed a man, but were acquitted on a plea of self-defense. Marlowe's political views were unorthodox, and he was thought to be a government secret agent. He was arrested in May of 1593 on a charge of atheism. Christopher Marlowe was killed in a brawl in a Deptford tavern on May 30, 1593 possibly by agents of statesman and Puritan sympathizer Sir Francis Walsingham. As with popular culture figures of today who die young, rumors persisted that Marlowe lived, some say, to write the plays that were attributed to William Shakespeare.
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