Every Man In This Village Is A Liar: An Education In War

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Every Man In This Village Is A Liar: An Education In War

by Megan Stack

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group | June 14, 2011 | Trade Paperback

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A National Book Award Finalist

A few weeks after the planes crashed into the World Trade Center, journalist Megan K. Stack was thrust into Afghanistan and Pakistan, dodging gunmen, prodding warlords for information, and witnessing the changes sweeping the Muslim world.  Every Man in This Village Is a Liar is her riveting story of what she saw in the combat zones and beyond. She relates her initial wild excitement and slow disillusionment as the cost of violence outweighs the promise of democracy; she records the raw pain of suicide bombings in Israel and Iraq; and, one by one, she marks the deaths and disappearances of those she interviews.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 272 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.39 in

Published: June 14, 2011

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0767930347

ISBN - 13: 9780767930345

Found in: Social and Cultural Studies

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Every Man In This Village Is A Liar: An Education In War

Every Man In This Village Is A Liar: An Education In War

by Megan Stack

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 272 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.39 in

Published: June 14, 2011

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0767930347

ISBN - 13: 9780767930345

About the Book

A National Book Award finalist, "Every Man in This Village Is a Liar" is Stack's riveting account of what she saw in the combat zones of Afghanistan and Pakistan following 9/11.

Read from the Book

ONE EVERY MAN IN THIS VILLAGE IS A LIAR Cold dawn broke on the horizon outside. The bedroom door shushed open, bringing the morning air and a warlord on predator’s toes. I lay in a nest of polyester blankets and listened to his footsteps cross the carpet. Every muscle pulled tight. You reveal yourself in breath, in the nerves of your face. Count the breaths, in and out. He sat on the edge of the bed. Smooth breath, relax your eyes, don’t let the lids shake. Then his calloused old hand was stroking my hair, cupping my scalp, fingers dripping like algae onto my ears and cheeks. The warlord lived in Jalalabad, in a swath of Afghanistan where the soil is rich with poppies and land mines, in a house awash in guns. People whispered that he was a heroin trafficker. His tribal loyalists clotted the orange groves and rose gardens outside, AK-47s in dust-caked fingers. They said he was ruthless in war, that his skin was scarred by an arrow. There was a vague whisper about a legendary ambush, the warlord killing enemies with his bare hands. And now those ropey hands were petting my hair, silent and brazen. I clung to one thing: Brian, the photographer, was in the bathroom. Water slapped the floor. How long would his shower last, and how could I escape the warlord’s lechery without offending him? The truth was, we needed him. He was an enemy of the Taliban, funded by the U.S. government, making a play for power in the vague, new order that had be
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From the Publisher

A National Book Award Finalist

A few weeks after the planes crashed into the World Trade Center, journalist Megan K. Stack was thrust into Afghanistan and Pakistan, dodging gunmen, prodding warlords for information, and witnessing the changes sweeping the Muslim world.  Every Man in This Village Is a Liar is her riveting story of what she saw in the combat zones and beyond. She relates her initial wild excitement and slow disillusionment as the cost of violence outweighs the promise of democracy; she records the raw pain of suicide bombings in Israel and Iraq; and, one by one, she marks the deaths and disappearances of those she interviews.

About the Author

Megan K. Stack has reported on war, terrorism and political Islam from twenty-two countries since 2001. She was most recently Moscow bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times. She was awarded the 2007 Overseas Press Club's Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper reporting from abroad and was a finalist for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in international reporting.

Editorial Reviews

“A moving and unsettling account of war reporting in the age of terror. . . . Brave and engaged.” — Los Angeles Times “For readers frustrated with cold and unfeeling news coverage, Megan K. Stack’s Every Man in This Village Is a Liar will serve as a much-needed antidote. . . . Personal and impassioned. . . . Refreshingly candid and undeniably affecting.” — San Francisco Chronicle “Above and beyond the 24-hour news chatter, opaque papers, and truncated press reports, stands Megan K. Stack’s glittering Every Man in This Village is a Liar .” — The Christian Science Monitor   “Without stories like Stack’s, war becomes impersonal and easy to gloss over, relegated to page two. These stories—personal and vulnerable—are meaningful, if for no other reason than they force us to look again.” — Minneapolis Star-Tribune “Journalist Megan Stack sheds the customary pretenses of her profession to show us—with blistering eloquence and her own raw nerves laid bare—war’s impact on the non-combatants who bear the brunt of its horrors. You’ll be thinking about this book long after you turn the final page.” —Jon Krakauer, author of Where Men Win Glory “ Every Man in This Village is a Liar is an electrifying book by an extraordinary foreign correspondent. Megan Stack has braved the battlefields of Afghanistan and Iraq, decoded the secrets of
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Bookclub Guide

Megan K. Stack has reported on war, terrorism and political Islam from twenty-two countries since 2001. She was most recently Moscow bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times. She was awarded the 2007 Overseas Press Club's Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper reporting from abroad and was a finalist for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in international reporting.

1. Every Man in This Village Is a Liar is, in many ways, a book about telling the truth. What truths does Megan Stack discover and reveal throughout the course of the book? Why is it so important to tell the truth amid the lies of war?

2. Stack writes an article about Palestinian suicide bombers that engenders death threats from Israeli readers. When she asks why, a reporter friend tells her: "You humanized them. You're writing about suicide bombers as people who have corpses and families. They can't stand to see them written about like that" (p. 44). Why is it necessary to dehumanize one's enemies during war? In what ways is Stack's book an effort to humanize everyone she writes about?

3. Who are some of the most memorable people Stack meets during her reporting on the Middle East? Why is it so important to tell the stories of individual human beings caught up in the suffering, pain, and grief of war?

4. Writing about the Old Testament story of Abraham's willingness to sacrifice to his son Isaac in order to do God's will, Stack observes "the trouble is that, centuries later, the Middle East is still packed with murderers who believe they are doing God's will, privately attuned to the ring of God's voice. This is still how Middle Eastern battles are fought, by Arabs, Israelis, and now by Americans. Blind faith is the footbridge that takes us from virtuous religion to self-righteous violence" (p. 103). Why does religious fundamentalism so often lead to violence? Has America been guilty of the same kind of self-righteous extremism it opposes in the Middle East?

5. After the killing of the courageous Iraqi journalist Atwar Bahjat, who "wanted to calm things down not stoke the anger" Stack writes: "There was no place in Iraq for a woman like that" (p. 197). Why is there no place in Iraq for someone like Atwar Bahjat?

6. What does Stack reveal about how women are treated throughout the Middle East? Why is it important to have a woman journalist's view of the conflicts in the region? What contrasts are provided by the American women Stack interviews in Saudi Arabia?

7. "Here is the truth," Stack writes. "It matters, what you do at war. It matters more than you ever want to know"  (p. 51). Why does it matter so much what one does in war? What are the consequences not just for individuals but for nations in how they conduct themselves during war?

8. Every Man in This Village Is a Liar is subtitled An Education in War. In what ways is Stack educated by war? In what ways does she educate her readers about the realities of war?

9. How does Every Man in This Village Is a Liar challenge conventional views of the Middle East?

10. Near the end of the book, Stack writes about the strange feeling of being present and absent at the same time. It occurs to her that this might be "the most American trait of all, the trademark of these wars. To be there and be gone all at once, to tell ourselves it just happened, we did what we did but we had no control over the consequences" (p. 240). In what ways is this an essentially American trait? What dangers are inherent in this way of being simultaneously engaged and disengaged?

11. Stack ends the book by reminding readers what war has taught her: "You can survive and not survive, both at the same time" (p. 245). What is the meaning of this paradoxical statement?

12. In the epilogue, Stack writes that she has "given up on pulling poetry out of war" (p. 246). In what ways has Stack found a gritty, heartbreaking poetry the war-torn Middle East? What passages in the book rise to the level of poetry? Why would she give up this way of writing about war?

13. What are some of the most harrowing moments in the book? What effect do they have on Stack and on her readers?

14. Stack concludes that the "war on terror never really existed," that it was "essentially nothing but a unifying myth for a complicated scramble of mixed impulses and social theories and night terrors and cruelty and business interests, all overhung with the unassailable memory of falling skyscrapers" (p. 3). Is she right about this? In what sense is the war on terror unreal? 

15. Every Man in This Village Is a Liar plunges readers into the visceral particulars of the war in Iraq and other ongoing conflicts in the region, giving a vivid sense of the texture of war. But what larger points does the book make about war, America's involvement in the Middle East, the treatment of women in Islamic countries, and other issues?

(For a complete list of available reading group guides, and to sign up for the Reading Group Center enewsletter, visit: www.readinggroupcenter.com.)

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