Final Jeopardy: Man vs. Machine and the Quest to Know Everything

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Final Jeopardy: Man vs. Machine and the Quest to Know Everything

by Stephen Baker

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt | February 17, 2011 | Hardcover |

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"The place to go if you''re really interested in this version of the quest for creating Artificial Intelligence (AI)."-Seattle Times

For centuries, people have dreamed of creating a machine that thinks like a human. Scientists have made progress: computers can now beat chess grandmasters and help prevent terrorist attacks. Yet we still await a machine that exhibits the rich complexity of human thought-one that doesn''t just crunch numbers, or take us to a relevant Web page, but understands us and gives us what we need. With the creation of Watson, IBM''s Jeopardy! playing computer, we are one step closer to that goal.

But how did we get here? In Final Jeopardy, Stephen Baker traces the arc of Watson''s "life," from its birth in the IBM labs to its big night on the podium. We meet Hollywood moguls and Jeopardy! masters, genius computer programmers and ambitious scientists, including Watson''s eccentric creator, David Ferrucci. We see how a new generation of Watsons could transform medicine, the law, marketing, even science itself, as machines process huge amounts of data at lightning speed, answer our questions, and possibly come up with new hypotheses. As fast and fun as the game itself, Final Jeopardy shows how smart machines will fit into our world-and how they''ll disrupt it.

"Like Tracy Kidder''s Soul of a New Machine, Baker''s book finds us at the dawn of a singularity. It''s an excellent case study, and does good double duty as a Philip K. Dick scenario, too."-Kirkus Reviews

"Baker''s narrative is both charming and terrifying . . . an entertaining romp through the field of artificial intelligence-and a sobering glimpse of things to come."-Publishers Weekly, starred review

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 288 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.79 in

Published: February 17, 2011

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0547483163

ISBN - 13: 9780547483160

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– More About This Product –

Final Jeopardy: Man vs. Machine and the Quest to Know Everything

by Stephen Baker

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 288 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.79 in

Published: February 17, 2011

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0547483163

ISBN - 13: 9780547483160

About the Book

What if there were a computer that could answer virtually any question? IBM engineers are developing such a machine, teaching it to compete on the quiz show "Jeopardy." Baker carries readers on a captivating journey from the IBM labs to the showdown in Hollywood.

Read from the Book

Introduction Watson paused. The closest thing it had to a face, a glowing orb on a flat-panel screen, turned from forest green to a dark shade of blue. Filaments of yellow and red streamed steadily across it, like the paths of jets circumnavigating the globe. This pattern represented a state of quiet anticipation as the supercomputer awaited the next clue. It was a September morning in 2010 at IBM Research, in the hills north of New York City, and the computer, known as Watson, was annihilating two humans, both champion players, in practice rounds of Jeopardy! Within months, it would be playing the game on national television in a million-dollar man vs. machine match against two of Jeopardy ''s all-time greats. As Todd Crain, an actor and the host of these test games, started to read the next clue, the filaments on Watson''s display began to jag and tremble. Watson was thinking - or coming as close to it as a computer could. The $1,600 clue, in the category The Eyes Have It, read: "This facial ware made Israel''s Moshe Dayan instantly recognizable worldwide." The three players - two human and one electronic - could read the words as soon as they appeared on the big Jeopardy board. But they had to wait for Crain to read the entire clue before buzzing. That was the rule. As the host pronounced the last word, a light would signal that contestants could buzz. The first to hit the button could win $1,600 with the right answer - or lose the same amount with a wrong one. (In these t
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Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction 1

1. The Germ of the Jeopardy Machine 19
2. And Representing the Humans 42
3. Blue J Is Born 62
4. Educating Blue J 81
5. Watson''s Face 104
6. Watson Takes On Humans 124
7. AI 148
8. A Season of Jitters 170
9. Watson Looks for Work 189
10. How to Play the Game 210
11. The Match 232

Acknowledgments 259
Notes 263
Sources and Further Reading 267
About the Author 269

From the Publisher

"The place to go if you''re really interested in this version of the quest for creating Artificial Intelligence (AI)."-Seattle Times

For centuries, people have dreamed of creating a machine that thinks like a human. Scientists have made progress: computers can now beat chess grandmasters and help prevent terrorist attacks. Yet we still await a machine that exhibits the rich complexity of human thought-one that doesn''t just crunch numbers, or take us to a relevant Web page, but understands us and gives us what we need. With the creation of Watson, IBM''s Jeopardy! playing computer, we are one step closer to that goal.

But how did we get here? In Final Jeopardy, Stephen Baker traces the arc of Watson''s "life," from its birth in the IBM labs to its big night on the podium. We meet Hollywood moguls and Jeopardy! masters, genius computer programmers and ambitious scientists, including Watson''s eccentric creator, David Ferrucci. We see how a new generation of Watsons could transform medicine, the law, marketing, even science itself, as machines process huge amounts of data at lightning speed, answer our questions, and possibly come up with new hypotheses. As fast and fun as the game itself, Final Jeopardy shows how smart machines will fit into our world-and how they''ll disrupt it.

"Like Tracy Kidder''s Soul of a New Machine, Baker''s book finds us at the dawn of a singularity. It''s an excellent case study, and does good double duty as a Philip K. Dick scenario, too."-Kirkus Reviews

"Baker''s narrative is both charming and terrifying . . . an entertaining romp through the field of artificial intelligence-and a sobering glimpse of things to come."-Publishers Weekly, starred review

About the Author

STEPHEN BAKER was BusinessWeek''s senior technology writer for a decade, based first in Paris and later New York. He has also written for the Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, and the Wall Street Journal. Roger Lowenstein called his first book, The Numerati, "an eye-opening and chilling book." Baker blogs at finaljeopardy.net.

Editorial Reviews

"The book is the place to go if you''re really interested in this version of the quest for creating Artificial Intelligence (AI) . . . Lively." -Seattle Times



"Baker skillfully weaves the two threads of the story together, and the book contains many passages that make the reader not only assess what they think but how they think, and how they have absorbed and stored the knowledge they possess. It''s books like this that remind us there is still so much we don''t understand about our own brains, and that the journey of discovery has only just begun." -Culture Mob



"Baker''s narrative is both charming and terrifying...an entertaining romp through the field of artificial intelligence - and a sobering glimpse of things to come." -STARRED, Publishers Weekly
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