For Whom the Bell Tolls

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

For Whom the Bell Tolls

by Ernest Hemingway

Scribner | July 1, 1995 | Trade Paperback

For Whom the Bell Tolls is rated 4.4 out of 5 by 5.
In 1937 Ernest Hemingway traveled to Spain to cover the civil war there for the North American Newspaper Alliance. Three years later he completed the greatest novel to emerge from "the good fight," For Whom the Bell Tolls.

The story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an antifascist guerilla unit in the mountains of Spain, it tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal. In his portrayal of Jordan''s love for the beautiful Maria and his superb account of El Sordo''s last stand, in his brilliant travesty of La Pasionaria and his unwillingness to believe in blind faith, Hemingway surpasses his achievement in The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms to create a work at once rare and beautiful, strong and brutal, compassionate, moving, and wise. "If the function of a writer is to reveal reality," Maxwell Perkins wrote Hemingway after reading the manuscript, "no one ever so completely performed it." Greater in power, broader in scope, and more intensely emotional than any of the author''s previous works, it stands as one of the best war novels of all time.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 480 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 1.1 in

Published: July 1, 1995

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0684803356

ISBN - 13: 9780684803357

Found in: Literary

save 27%

  • In stock online

$15.20  ea

Online Price

$20.00 List Price

or, Used from $5.04

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Check store inventory (prices may vary)

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not What I Expected! I really wanted to like this book but it did not bowl me over as I so hoped. Having travelled to Spain and knowing the people and culture intimately. the book did not capture me. Sorry to all the Papa Hemingway fans. The story lacked pace and action and the dialogue was detailed and overdrawn. I realize that back in 1940, the writing styles, audiences differed compared to today's norms. This book could easily have been chopped by half and still have the same if not bigger impact. Don't get me wrong the characters of Robert Jordan, Anselmo, Maria, Pilar, and Pablo are interesting and vivid. However,I did not got the full zeitgeist of the Spanish Civil War.
Date published: 2012-08-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from a classic! Many of the books that I admired decades ago have fallen flat when I’ve returned to them. Fortunately, For Whom the Bell Tolls is not among them. It’s not perfect, but the perfect novel doesn’t exist: one must leap over innate weaknesses to understand genius. This was — and still is — my favorite Hemingway novel, and includes one of my favorite fictional-female characters (a strong, metaphysical, forty-eight year old gypsy woman, Pilar: the de-facto leader of a small group of resistance guerrillas). It is set during the Spanish revolution — the prelude to WW II — and has a vein of carpe diem (and Buddhist sensibility) running through it: “You have it now and that is all your whole life is; now. There is nothing else than now. There is neither yesterday, certainly, nor is there any tomorrow. How old must you be before you know that? There is only now…” (Robert Jordan’s thoughts; Chapter 13, p. 185) I’ve read reviews that claim the novel moves like cold molasses, and I understand readers thinking that way, but the matrix of the story has a depth that is unusual in fiction. The characters are diverse and the tension is palpable. l enjoyed re-reading it more than the first time I read it a couple of decades ago. Hemingway was a journalist in the Spanish Civil War, and I think he saw himself in the role of Robert Jordan. Like the ‘Englés,’ Hemingway’s father committed suicide; unfortunately, unlike Roberto, Ernest Hemingway’s demons arrived before he had the opportunity to escape his father’s paradigm. For Whom the Bell Tolls is a book about humanity: love, loyalty, cowardliness, courage, the enjoyment of the present moment, comradery, altruism, and fighting for an ideal against reason.
Date published: 2012-06-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from This bell tolls for thee A poignant and touching novel following a simple love caught in the epic sweep of the spanish civil war. A beautiful novel written in Hemingways' signature succinct, tough, terse style. A must read.
Date published: 2006-05-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hemingway's best! I ADORED this book when I first read it. The love and the relationship of the two main characters (alas I have long since forgotten their names... except that the girl's nickname was rabbit) was so beautiful and touching. Of course, since it's Hemingway, the ending is rather tragic yet expected. It's a lovely book which is not as complicated to read as A Farewell to Arms and whose plot-line is also much better. I recommend this book to all Hemingway lovers if they have not read it, to people who have never read Hemingway (it's a MUST!!!), and to whoever else enjoys war-time romance in novels and all the classics of English literature.
Date published: 2001-05-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from PAPA Hemmingway at his best This was the book that started my love affair with Ernest Hemmingway. This is a profound, moving and gripping story of the Spanish Civil war which Hemmingway personally experienced. Hemmingway's prose is austere and lacking any floweriness, but oh man is it powerful!!! Read this book and embark on a journey with an author you won't forget
Date published: 1999-07-28

– More About This Product –

For Whom the Bell Tolls

by Ernest Hemingway

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 480 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 1.1 in

Published: July 1, 1995

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0684803356

ISBN - 13: 9780684803357

Read from the Book

Chapter One He lay flat on the brown, pine-needled floor of the forest, his chin on his folded arms, and high overhead the wind blew in the tops of the pine trees. The mountainside sloped gently where he lay; but below it was steep and he could see the dark of the oiled road winding through the pass. There was a stream alongside the road and far down the pass he saw a mill beside the stream and the falling water of the dam, white in the summer sunlight. "Is that the mill?" he asked. "Yes." "I do not remember it." "It was built since you were here. The old mill is farther down; much below the pass." He spread the photostated military map out on the forest floor and looked at it carefully. The old man looked over his shoulder. He was a short and solid old man in a black peasant''s smock and gray iron-stiff trousers and he wore rope-soled shoes. He was breathing heavily from the climb and his hand rested on one of the two heavy packs they had been carrying. "Then you cannot see the bridge from here." "No," the old man said. "This is the easy country of the pass where the stream flows gently. Below, where the road turns out of sight in the trees, it drops suddenly and there is a steep gorge -- " "I remember." "Across this gorge is the bridge." "And where are their posts?" "There is a post at the mill that you see there." The young man, who was studying the country, took his glasses from the pocket of his faded, khaki flannel shirt, wiped the lenses with a handkerchief, screwed th
read more read less

From the Publisher

In 1937 Ernest Hemingway traveled to Spain to cover the civil war there for the North American Newspaper Alliance. Three years later he completed the greatest novel to emerge from "the good fight," For Whom the Bell Tolls.

The story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an antifascist guerilla unit in the mountains of Spain, it tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal. In his portrayal of Jordan''s love for the beautiful Maria and his superb account of El Sordo''s last stand, in his brilliant travesty of La Pasionaria and his unwillingness to believe in blind faith, Hemingway surpasses his achievement in The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms to create a work at once rare and beautiful, strong and brutal, compassionate, moving, and wise. "If the function of a writer is to reveal reality," Maxwell Perkins wrote Hemingway after reading the manuscript, "no one ever so completely performed it." Greater in power, broader in scope, and more intensely emotional than any of the author''s previous works, it stands as one of the best war novels of all time.

About the Author

Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in the family home in Oak Park, Ill., on July 21, 1899. In high school, Hemingway enjoyed working on The Trapeze, his school newspaper, where he wrote his first articles. Upon graduation in the spring of 1917, Hemingway took a job as a cub reporter for the Kansas City Star. After a short stint in the U.S. Army as a volunteer Red Cross ambulance driver in Italy, Hemingway moved to Paris, and it was here that Hemingway began his well-documented career as a novelist. Hemingway's first collection of short stories and vignettes, entitled In Our Time, was published in 1925. His first major novel, The Sun Also Rises, the story of American and English expatriates in Paris and on excursion to Pamplona, immediately established him as one of the great prose stylists and preeminent writers of his time. In this book, Hemingway quotes Gertrude Stein, "You are all a lost generation," thereby labeling himself and other expatriate writers, including Scott Fitzgerald, T.S. Eliot, and Ford Madox Ford. Other novels written by Hemingway include: A Farewell To Arms, the story, based in part on Hemingway's life, of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse; For Whom the Bell Tolls, the story of an American who fought, loved, and died with the guerrillas in the mountains of Spain; and To Have and Have Not, about an honest man forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West. Non-fiction includes Green Hill
read more read less

From Our Editors

Part of Ernest Hemingway's art was the familiarity he had with the subjects, places and situations he wrote of. Over the course of three defining days documented in For Whom the Bell Tolls happens a profound and timeless story of courage and commitment, love and loss. Drawing on Hemingway's own involvement in the Spanish Civil War, this novel reflects his passionate feelings about the nature of war and the meaning of loyalty. Written in his trademark subtle style, it is neither preachy nor ignorant, instead employing hypnotizing osmosis to captivate readers.

Bookclub Guide

Reading Group Guide for For Whom the Bell Tolls

Introduction

Ernest Hemingway was born July 21, 1899, in Oak Park, Illinois. After graduation from high school, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri, where he worked briefly for the Kansas City Star. Failing to qualify for the United States Army because of poor eyesight, he enlisted with the American Red Cross to drive ambulances in Italy. He was severely wounded on the Austrian front on July 9, 1918. Following recuperation in a Milan hospital, he returned home and became a freelance writer for the Toronto Star.

In December of 1921, he sailed to France and joined an expatriate community of writers and artists in Paris while continuing to write for the Toronto Star. There his fiction career began in "little magazines" and small presses and led to a volume of short stories, In Our Time (1925). His novels The Sun Also Rises (1926) and A Farewell to Arms (1929) established Hemingway as the most important and influential fiction writer of his generation. His later collections of short stories and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940) affirmed his extraordinary career while his highly publicized life gave him unrivaled celebrity as a literary figure.

Hemingway became an authority on the subjects of his art: trout fishing, bullfighting, big-game hunting, and deep-sea fishing, and the cultures of the regions in which he set his work -- France, Italy, Spain, Cuba, and Africa.

The Old Man and the Sea (1952) earned him the Pulitzer Prize and was instrumental in his being awarded the Nobel Prize in 1954. Hemingway died in Ketchum, Idaho, on July 2, 1961.

Description

Robert Jordan, a Spanish professor from Montana serving with Loyalist guerrilla forces during the Spanish Civil War, is guided by the old man Anselmo to Pablo''s guerrilla band in the mountains above a bridge which Jordan must blow up when the Loyalist offensive begins. Pablo, aware that Jordan''s mission will invite fascist forces, refuses at first to participate, but relents, returning with additional men and horses shortly before the mission begins. Knowing that the fascists are aware of the offensive, Jordan sends a message to General Golz, hoping the offensive will be canceled, but the message arrives too late. Jordan blows the bridge, and Anselmo is killed by flying steel. As the group attempts escape, Jordan is seriously injured, and Maria, having been told by Jordan that he will always be with her, leaves with the survivors while Jordan remains behind, waiting for death.

Discussion Questions

1. Is Pablo opposed to blowing the bridge because he is a coward, as Pilar says, or is Pablo, himself, correct when he says he "has a tactical sense"? Why does Jordan agree with Pablo''s reference to "the seriousness of this" (p. 54)? Is Agustín correct when he calls Pablo "very smart" (p. 94)?

2. Was the communist effort to eliminate God successful? What does Anselmo''s view of killing suggest about the limitations of dogma? What does he mean when he says of the bridge sentries, "It is only orders that come between us" (pp. 192-193)? What is implied when Anselmo says soldiers should atone and cleanse themselves after the war?

3. "Time" is a major theme in For Whom the Bell Tolls. How does Pilar''s awareness of time affect her attitude toward Robert Jordan''s and Maria''s relationship? What conclusions does Robert Jordan draw about his own life during the very short time he spends with Maria?

4. Pablo calls his compatriots "illusioned people" (p. 215). Does this remark prove to be true? Does Jordan expose illusions? Does For Whom the Bell Tolls suggest that because of their illusions and vulnerability to exploitation the victims of the war were the entire Spanish people?

5. Does the epigraph, an excerpt from John Donne''s Devotions XVII, convey the theme of For Whom the Bell Tolls? What is that theme? What scenes in the novel develop the sentiment of the epigraph? What is the narrator telling us when he says that Robert Jordan, lying on the forest floor waiting for death, is "completely integrated" (p. 471)?

After Reading the Novel

To read For Whom The Bell Tolls is to experience Hemingway''s most compelling assertion of his role as an artist. Writing in a time of war and of passionate partisans, he chose truth once more, and he chose as well aesthetic principles over propaganda. Your group might enjoy Hemingway''s Spanish Civil War dispatches written prior to For Whom the Bell Tolls. They are available in By-Line: Ernest Hemingway (Touchstone Books) and provide clues to Hemingway''s process of composition. You might also want to compare The Fifth Column, Hemingway''s play about the Spanish Civil War, to the novel and draw conclusions as to why the play did not succeed as did the novel. The Spanish Earth, a Loyalist film which Hemingway helped make, is not readily available: however, it can be obtained, usually from your public, college, or university library. Although it is propagandistic, it does provide battlefield scenes along with Hemingway''s sound-track comments. A Hollywood movie of For Whom the Bell Tolls stars Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman.

Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart