Four Years In Southern Africa

by Cowper Rose

General Books LLC | May 20, 2014 | Trade Paperback

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ... LETTER III. Graham''s Town.--Population.--Situation.--Poortes State of Agriculture.--Produce-Waggons of the Boors.--Duchany, a Kaffer Chief.--Begging.--Different Animals.--Elephant-hunting Singular Adventure.--The Orange River.--The Chief Chaka.--The Kaffers--Depredations committed by the Border-tribes. How short a time can change our abode, our pursuits, and our companions! Three days and a gale of wind have done it for me, and I am now seven hundred miles from the Cape, at Graham''s Town, the capital of Albany, which is the eastern frontier of the colony, bordering on Kafferland. In this part of the country, the settlers who left England for Africa some years since, were located, that is, had grants of land bestowed upon them, and the population is almost wholly English. Graham''s Town, now a large, ugly, ill-built, straggling place, containing, I should think, nearly three thousand inhabitants and soldiers, was a few years back only a military post, and the mimosa tree stands in the principal street, beneath which, it is said, the first English officer, Colonel Graham, who led a military party there, pitched his tent. Colonel Graham is dead, and the second town in the colony bears his name,--a name that is often mentioned, and always with respect. Houses have sprung up quickly of every variety of form, and barracks, and a church for the established faith, and chapels for all sects--Dissenters, Wesleyans, Anabaptists, Independents, &c. and last, not least, the handsomest building, and the most necessary, is a gaol. The population is a strange mixture of lounging officers, idle tradesmen, (merchants, I beg their pardon,) drunken soldiers, and still more drunken settlers. We have high authority for saying, that "your Dane, your German, and...

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 108 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.22 in

Published: May 20, 2014

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1150553200

ISBN - 13: 9781150553202

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– More About This Product –

Four Years In Southern Africa

by Cowper Rose

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 108 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.22 in

Published: May 20, 2014

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1150553200

ISBN - 13: 9781150553202

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ... LETTER III. Graham''s Town.--Population.--Situation.--Poortes State of Agriculture.--Produce-Waggons of the Boors.--Duchany, a Kaffer Chief.--Begging.--Different Animals.--Elephant-hunting Singular Adventure.--The Orange River.--The Chief Chaka.--The Kaffers--Depredations committed by the Border-tribes. How short a time can change our abode, our pursuits, and our companions! Three days and a gale of wind have done it for me, and I am now seven hundred miles from the Cape, at Graham''s Town, the capital of Albany, which is the eastern frontier of the colony, bordering on Kafferland. In this part of the country, the settlers who left England for Africa some years since, were located, that is, had grants of land bestowed upon them, and the population is almost wholly English. Graham''s Town, now a large, ugly, ill-built, straggling place, containing, I should think, nearly three thousand inhabitants and soldiers, was a few years back only a military post, and the mimosa tree stands in the principal street, beneath which, it is said, the first English officer, Colonel Graham, who led a military party there, pitched his tent. Colonel Graham is dead, and the second town in the colony bears his name,--a name that is often mentioned, and always with respect. Houses have sprung up quickly of every variety of form, and barracks, and a church for the established faith, and chapels for all sects--Dissenters, Wesleyans, Anabaptists, Independents, &c. and last, not least, the handsomest building, and the most necessary, is a gaol. The population is a strange mixture of lounging officers, idle tradesmen, (merchants, I beg their pardon,) drunken soldiers, and still more drunken settlers. We have high authority for saying, that "your Dane, your German, and...
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