Frameshift

by Robert J. Sawyer

Tom Doherty Associates | November 1, 1998 | Mass Market Paperbound |

Not yet rated | write a review
This is the story of Pierre Tradivel, a scientist, and his complex battle against deadly illness, and ex-Nazi war criminal still hiding in the U.S., a crooked insurance company, and a plot to make Pierre and his wife the victims of a bizarre genetic experiment. Frameshift is hard science fiction at its best, full of complications and neat surprises.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 352 Pages, 3.94 × 6.3 × 0.79 in

Published: November 1, 1998

Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0812571088

ISBN - 13: 9780812571080

save
5%

Out of stock Sorry, this item has sold out and may be re-stocked in the future. Hurry, only 0 left! Not yet released

$8.99  ea

Online Price

$8.99 List Price

Cart

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Frameshift

by Robert J. Sawyer

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 352 Pages, 3.94 × 6.3 × 0.79 in

Published: November 1, 1998

Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0812571088

ISBN - 13: 9780812571080

From the Publisher

This is the story of Pierre Tradivel, a scientist, and his complex battle against deadly illness, and ex-Nazi war criminal still hiding in the U.S., a crooked insurance company, and a plot to make Pierre and his wife the victims of a bizarre genetic experiment. Frameshift is hard science fiction at its best, full of complications and neat surprises.

From the Jacket

"The basic setup of The Terminal Experiment is that of a near-future thriller, and it works admirably . . .. [Sawyer has] done such a fine job, it's little wonder that earlier this year the book won the Nebula Award for best novel." -- The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

"Quirky; diverting -- an inventive and engaging novel." -- New York Newsday on Far-Seer.

Robert J. Sawyer is the hottest writer of the science fiction thriller today. His last novel, The Terminal Experiment, was a finalist for the Hugo Award as well as the winner of the Nebula Award.

Orson Scott Card has said that Sawyer writes "with near-Asimovian clarity, with energy and drive, with such grace that his writing becomes invisible as the story comes to life in your mind." Now he has brought his powerful storytelling talents and his keen insight into the ramifications of the latest scientific breakthroughs to Frameshift.

Pierre Tardivel is a scientist working on the Human Genome Project with the Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Burian Klimus. A driven man, Pierre works with the awareness that he may not have long to live: he has a fifty-fifty chance of dying from Huntington's disease, an incurable hereditary disorder of the central nervous system. While he still has his health, Pierre and his wife decide to have a child, and they search for a sperm donor. When Pierre informs Dr. Klimus of their plan, Klimus makes an odd but generous offer: to be the sperm donor as well as to pay for the expensive in vitro fertilization. Shortly thereafter it transpires that Klimus might be hiding a grim past: he may be Ivan Marchenko, the notorious Treblinka death-camp guard known as Ivan the Terrible.

While digging into Klimus's past with the help of Nazi hunter Avi Meyer, Pierre and his wife discover that Pierre's insurance company has been illegally screening clients for genetic defects. The two lines of investigation begin to coverage in a sinister manner, while they worry about the possibility of bearing the child of an evil, sadistic killer . . ..

ROBERT J. SAWYER lives in Thornhill, Ontario. His is the author of the Quintaglio Ascension trilogy, the three volumes of which are allegories about the lives of Galileo (Far-Seer), Darwin Fossil Hunter, and Freud

About the Author

Science fiction writer Robert J. Sawyer has sold fifteen science fiction novels to major New York publishers, and won twenty-one national and international writing awards. Rob is the only author in history to win the top science fiction awards in the United States (the Nebula), Japan (the Seium), France (Le Grand Prix de L'Imaginaire) and Spain (Premio UPC de Ciencia Ficcion).  In addition, he's won five Aurora Awards (Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy Award).

His The Terminal Experiment won the Nebula Award (the "Academy Award" of the science fiction field) for Best Novel of the Year, and he's had four consecutive best-novel nominations for the Hugo Award, science fiction's international people's choice award.

Robert J. Sawyer lives in Thornhill, Ontario, Canada, with his wife, Carolyn Clink.

 

From Our Editors

A scientist working on the Human Genome Project discovers that his insurance company is secretly taking genetic samples from its policyholders in Frameshift. His investigation reveals that the company's profit margin is skyrocketing as at-risk clients are mysteriously eliminated and that the mastermind behind the gruesome scheme may be Ivan Marchenko, the notorious "Ivan the Terrible" of the Treblinka death camp. Robert J. Sawyer is the award-winning author of The Terminal Experiment.

Editorial Reviews

"Filled to bursting with ideas, characters, and incidents."--The New York Times

"A finely crafted novel with a riveting plot and complex characters that one can care about deeply."--Calgary Herald

"Robert Sawyer''s science fiction is always ambitious, well-written, and imaginative. With each novel he keeps getting better."--Kevin J. Anderson

Bookclub Guide

Many reading groups have enjoyed novels by Robert J. Sawyer. The following questions may help stimulate an interesting discussion about Frameshift. (These questions might also suggest essay topics for students studying the book.)

Note that these questions reveal much of the novel's plot; to preserve your reading pleasure, please don't look at these questions until after you've finished reading the book.

  1. The case of John Demjanjuk really happened as outlined in Frameshift. With the exception of Avi Meyer, all the characters portrayed in the Jerusalem trial scene are real people, saying things they actually said during the trial. Is it appropriate to blend fact and fiction like this? And are the parallels Sawyer raises between the Demjanjuk trial and both To Kill a Mockingbird and Judgment at Nuremberg fair? Likewise, how appropriate was Sawyer's invoking, elsewhere in the novel, Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech?
  2. The novel makes the case that it is in fact cruel to diagnose someone with the gene for a serious genetic disorder that hasn't yet manifested itself if there's nothing that can be done to prevent the onset of the disease. Would you in fact want to know if you had the gene for Huntington's disease?
  3. Sawyer seems to believe strongly that socialized medicine is the only solution that makes sense in the genetic age. Do you agree or disagree with him? Why?
  4. A few critics have suggested that Sawyer is unfair to men in this book, since the isolated glimpses of some of their minds that we see through Molly's telepathy are quite distasteful. Does Sawyer's take on men's private thoughts about women ring true?
  5. The novel's structure is unusual: it starts with neo-Nazi Chuck Hanratty's attack on Pierre Tardivel, and then about half the book is a series of flashbacks, going as far back as 1944, leading up to that event. Was this an effective way to structure the book? In interviews, Sawyer has said he tried drafting it three different ways: (1) in straight chronological order, starting with the Treblinka scene, and without the Hanratty attack occurring until its natural point in the narrative; (2) with the Treblinka scene as a prologue preceding the attack by Hanratty; and, (3) as presented in the final book, beginning with the attack, then flashing back to Treblinka. Did Sawyer choose the most effective sequence? On a related note, there are chapters that were cut from the novel detailing Pierre and Molly's lives before they met; the full text of these chapters is on Sawyer's web site at www.sfwriter.com/frlc.htm. Was he right to cut these chapters?
  6. Frameshift has several different plot elements: the Treblinka / Demanjuk arc; the Klimus and Amanda-clone arc; the insurance-company arc; Pierre's Huntington's disease; Molly's telepathy; and the discovery of a new layer of information coded in our DNA. Do you think they intertwine well? Were all of them necessary? (Hint: see the Frameshift structural analysis on Sawyer's web site at www.sfwriter.com/frstruct.htm for the author's own take on this question.)
  7. Molly wanted to marry Pierre despite knowing that he would become extremely disabled in only a few years. Would you have made the same choice Molly did?
  8. The novel touches on some of the moral quandaries raised by human cloning, in particular the question of who owns a clone. What impact do you think the ability to create clones will have on society? Should human cloning be banned?
  9. Many readers assumed that because Pierre is a geneticist, he will find a cure for Huntington's disease before the novel is over, thereby saving himself. This doesn't happen. Did Sawyer make the right decision? Is the end of the book a downer or is it uplifting?
  10. There's a religious subtext to the novel, especially in the notion that the broad strokes of humanity's development had been planned out by a creator. Can the hard scientific worldview portrayed in the novel ever be reconciled with matters of faith?
Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart