Frankenstein

by Charles Robinson, Elizabeth Kostova, Guillermo del Toro

Penguin Group US | October 1, 2013 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

Frankenstein is rated 5 out of 5 by 1.
Part of a new six-volume series of the best in classic horror, selected by award-winning director Guillermo del Toro

Filmmaker and longtime horror literature fan Guillermo del Toro serves as the curator for the Penguin Horror series, a new collection of classic tales and poems by masters of the genre. Included here are some of del Toro’s favorites, from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Ray Russell’s short story “Sardonicus,” considered by Stephen King to be “perhaps the finest example of the modern Gothic ever written,” to Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House and stories by Ray Bradbury, Joyce Carol Oates, Ted Klein, and Robert E. Howard. Featuring original cover art by Penguin Art Director Paul Buckley, these stunningly creepy deluxe hardcovers will be perfect additions to the shelves of horror, sci-fi, fantasy, and paranormal aficionados everywhere.


Frankenstein

The epic battle between man and monster reaches its greatest pitch in the famous story of Frankenstein. In trying to create life, the young student Victor Frankenstein unleashes forces beyond his control, setting into motion a long and tragic chain of events that brings Victor himself to the very brink. How he tries to destroy his creation, as it destroys everything Victor loves, is a powerful story of love, friendship . . . and horror.




Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 1, 2013

Publisher: Penguin Group US

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1101662778

ISBN - 13: 9781101662779

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A good read! The English in this novel is excellent and quite poetic. Having watched several film versions of this story I decided to give the original novel a chance. I was not disappointed! The films do not do justice to this great novel (as is usually the case with book-to-film formats). There is so much depth of feeling in Shelley's writing! You will sympathize greatly with the creature; especially if you yourself have suffered the stigma of a deformity or feel left out by the "beautiful people". This novel is especially poignant for today: with society's fixation on youth and beauty. I wish this were required reading in every high school!
Date published: 2014-09-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic for Horror Lovers It's an old-time story but that's what makes it such a classic. It sends a good message through the story you'll probably have to think about by the time you're done reading this book. It is a difficult read for some but if you're a horror fan, this is a must read! I loved it.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A moving, disturbing, depressing, but also touching tale Much like Bram Stoker's "Dracula", Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is a story we all think we know, but really don't. Very few films have consciously attempted to follow the novel too closely (which shouldn't detract from the excellent James Whale/Boris Karloff film, or its masterpiece-sequel, "The Bride of Frankenstein). Thus, everything popular culture "knows" about "Frankenstein" does not originate from literature, but from films. This is a shame, in a way, because the novel itself is, if not the progenitor, an early vessel of so many archetypes found science fiction and horror. The basic plot remained intact when transferred to other media. Swiss medical student Victor Frankenstein discovers the secret of life (which he never reveals, lest someone repeat the mistake). He then puts together a body, essentially a man, from various corpses. He then becomes horrified by the creature he has built, and abandons. The creature, suffering a great deal of neglect and abuse, still manages to get a thorough education, and learns of his lineage. After murdering Victor's younger brother, and framing the family maid, the creature tells his (admittedly) sad tale to his "father", and then demands a mate. Victor, in a panic, agrees, then thinks better of it at the last moment, destroying the new bride. In retaliation, the creature murders all of Victor's loved ones (including his wife), and leads Victor on a merry chase across the world. Most probably know that Mary Shelley wrote this book in response to a challenge issued by Lord Byron, during a vacation at Lake Geneva. (Along with this story came John Polidori's "The Vampyre", the first English vampire novel.) Most probably also know that Shelley went on to write other works of imaginative gothic fiction. Still, her modern reputation rests with this book, understandably. As stated, numerous archetypes (themes, plot lines, characters) are present here. The basic fear of what evil technology may bring along with the good is a central theme, as is the warning against playing God. So is the implicit admonition to be responsible in all things, be it during innovation or being a parent. The creature is, for all intents and purposes, an android-everyone from Gort to C-3PO owe their existence to the Frankenstein monster. And the monster that slays all but one protagonist is a staple of horror, be it traditional monster movies, like "Alien", or more realistic slasher movies like "Halloween". But, as I noted at the beginning of this review, certain of these elements have been lost in most interpretations. The creature is actually intelligent, and well-spoken, quite different from the inarticulate grunts or slow, half-sentences of the movies (again, no disrespect to Karloff). Further, while the films have made lightening a staple of the creatures creation, Shelley never really explains the process (probably knowing that she might interfere with the plausibility of her work). Finally, one of the staples of the films is the explanation for the creatures "evil" nature. Often, the problem lies with the brain used, which almost invariably is a criminal brain, or is damaged before implantation. In the book, the creature is really a child that's horribly neglected, but with the strength and intelligence to strike back: id without superego, and without restraints. Thus, "Frankenstein" will be a new experience for readers who have never experienced it. Unlike "Dracula", there aren't any moments where a reader might look up and suddenly realize how quiet it is in the house, or how dark it's gotten outside. In that regard, "Frankenstein" has not aged particularly well. Throughout, however, it is a moving, disturbing, depressing, but also a touching and beautiful tale. Those qualities have withstood the test of time. While it is not always a rollicking adventure, it is a rewarding read.
Date published: 2013-10-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great Classic while I really enjoyed reading this book from a classical lit perspective, people should be ready that it really isn't anything like how the movies portay Frankenstein's monster. It can be a bit wordy at times and a little drawn out at places. Loved it all the same. ^_^
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Frankenstein "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley is a fascinating book. I was prejudiced by the film adaptations of this novel. To start with I had no idea that Frankenstein is actually Victor Frankenstein, the creator of a monster. The monster that was created is not called Frankenstein; it is his creator's name. The monster is the creation of Victor Frankenstein and the monster is lithe, strong, fast and intelligent; this again differs greatly from any film version of the book. In reading the book I sympathized with the monster that is spurned by his master and by all who gaze upon his repugnant form. The monster flees from society and lives in a hovel, while secretly observing a family which consists of a blind father, a daughter and a son. In observing the family the monster learns their language and learns about love and acceptance and thus learns about the wretchedness of his own existence; how he longs to be part of the family. He attempts to join the family, but one glance at his hideous frame and the family rejects him with great horror. The monster then seeks out his maker and is rejected once again and this turns his soul to malevolence and revenge. Victor Frankenstein loses his brother, friend and wife to the monsters murdering hands and indirectly the monster is responsible for the death of Victor's father and a friend of Victor’s family. Victor pursues his creation to the ends of earth to rid mankind of the fiend. The story ends up in the North Pole and the ending is tragic. Victor loses his life in his journey and once his creator is dead the monster decides there is no reason for his own existence. "Frankenstein" is a fabulous read, a read that has you sympathizing with the monster. His creator rejected him when all he wanted was acceptance. Mankind rejected him due to his hideous appearance. He was kind and giving, but turned to hatred and evil due to society's rejection of his physical being. "Frankenstein" is a thought provoking read.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Frankenstein has all the best. The romance, the action and the inner depth of morality. The story is that of passion and the sorrow the "monster" feels throughout his short life and the power of the human soul. At the worst time the beast wanted nothing more than that of comfort and a companion, to which he was denied. A tale of promise and literature and the power and consequence of knowledge. A must for all who read...
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Age does nothing to dull this book I wasn't expecting the story I got when I read this for the first time. Everyone knows about the monster...or do they? The questions about our own mortality and mankind's desire to live are brilliantly woven into a plot that so many people assume is little more than a B-movie. Some haunting images still visit my imagination when I think of this book. WOW!!!
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I did this for grade 11 eng independent study... ...and it was great. The book was recommended to me by by teacher. I thought, since it was of literary value, that it must be boring. But it is very interesting, and you can actually understand it and relate to it. Before buying the book, I read online reviews and was disappointed because lots os people urged others not to read it. I would recommend this books to others, though. My personal background: I like to read a variety of materials, do well in english, and never read classic novels outside of study purposes.
Date published: 2013-10-29

– More About This Product –

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 1, 2013

Publisher: Penguin Group US

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1101662778

ISBN - 13: 9781101662779

From the Publisher

Part of a new six-volume series of the best in classic horror, selected by award-winning director Guillermo del Toro

Filmmaker and longtime horror literature fan Guillermo del Toro serves as the curator for the Penguin Horror series, a new collection of classic tales and poems by masters of the genre. Included here are some of del Toro’s favorites, from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Ray Russell’s short story “Sardonicus,” considered by Stephen King to be “perhaps the finest example of the modern Gothic ever written,” to Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House and stories by Ray Bradbury, Joyce Carol Oates, Ted Klein, and Robert E. Howard. Featuring original cover art by Penguin Art Director Paul Buckley, these stunningly creepy deluxe hardcovers will be perfect additions to the shelves of horror, sci-fi, fantasy, and paranormal aficionados everywhere.


Frankenstein

The epic battle between man and monster reaches its greatest pitch in the famous story of Frankenstein. In trying to create life, the young student Victor Frankenstein unleashes forces beyond his control, setting into motion a long and tragic chain of events that brings Victor himself to the very brink. How he tries to destroy his creation, as it destroys everything Victor loves, is a powerful story of love, friendship . . . and horror.




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