Franny And Zooey

by J.d. Salinger
As told by J.d Salinger

Little, Brown And Company | May 1, 1991 | Mass Market Paperbound |

3.7778 out of 5 rating. 9 Reviews
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The author writes: FRANNY came out in The New Yorker in 1955, and was swiftly followed, in 1957 by ZOOEY. Both stories are early, critical entries in a narrative series I''m doing about a family of settlers in twentieth-century New York, the Glasses. It is a long-term project, patently an ambiguous one, and there is a real-enough danger, I suppose that sooner or later I''ll bog down, perhaps disappear entirely, in my own methods, locutions, and mannerisms. On the whole, though, I''m very hopeful. I love working on these Glass stories, I''ve been waiting for them most of my life, and I think I have fairly decent, monomaniacal plans to finish them with due care and all-available skill.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 176 Pages, 4.72 × 6.69 × 0.39 in

Published: May 1, 1991

Publisher: Little, Brown And Company

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0316769495

ISBN - 13: 9780316769495

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 13

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– More About This Product –

Franny And Zooey

by J.d. Salinger
As told by J.d Salinger

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 176 Pages, 4.72 × 6.69 × 0.39 in

Published: May 1, 1991

Publisher: Little, Brown And Company

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0316769495

ISBN - 13: 9780316769495

About the Book

The author writes: FRANNY came out in The New Yorker in 1955, and was swiftly followed, in 1957 by ZOOEY. Both stories are early, critical entries in a narrative series I'm doing about a family of settlers in twentieth-century New York, the Glasses. It is a long-term project, patently an ambiguous one, and there is a real-enough danger, I suppose that sooner or later I'll bog down, perhaps disappear entirely, in my own methods, locutions, and mannerisms. On the whole, though, I'm very hopeful. I love working on these Glass stories, I've been waiting for them most of my life, and I think I have fairly decent, monomaniacal plans to finish them with due care and all-available skill.

From the Publisher

The author writes: FRANNY came out in The New Yorker in 1955, and was swiftly followed, in 1957 by ZOOEY. Both stories are early, critical entries in a narrative series I''m doing about a family of settlers in twentieth-century New York, the Glasses. It is a long-term project, patently an ambiguous one, and there is a real-enough danger, I suppose that sooner or later I''ll bog down, perhaps disappear entirely, in my own methods, locutions, and mannerisms. On the whole, though, I''m very hopeful. I love working on these Glass stories, I''ve been waiting for them most of my life, and I think I have fairly decent, monomaniacal plans to finish them with due care and all-available skill.

About the Author

More than 20 years of seclusion and silence have taken their toll on J. D. Salinger's literary reputation, but the impact made by The Catcher in The Rye (1951) and the Glass family stories was deep enough to make a lasting impression and to assure his continued readership. Salinger was born in New York City of Jewish and Scottish-Irish extraction. He attended Manhattan public schools, a military academy in Pennsylvania, and three colleges, but received no degrees. "A happy tourist's year in Europe," he wrote in 1955, "when I was eighteen and nineteen. In the Army from '42 to '46, most of the time with the Fourth Division. . . . I've been writing since I was fifteen or so. My short stories have appeared in a number of magazines over the last ten years, mostly---and most happily---in the New Yorker. I worked on "The "Catcher in the Rye,' on and off, for ten years" (Twentieth Century Authors). "Remarkable and absorb-ing . . . profoundly moving . . . magic," Harrison Smith called this story. The Catcher has been an extremely popular book among young people ever since its appearance and has brought Salinger an international reputation. Franny and Zooey (1961) is composed of two long New Yorker stories, which appeared in 1955 and 1957, recording a significant weekend in the lives of Franny Glass, a troubled 20-year-old college student, and her brother Zooey, a television actor. Raise High the Roof Beam, (1963) is another story of the Glass family. There are seven Glass children, "t
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From Our Editors

In the toils of the Glass family and their utilitarian lifestyle lay two children. Franny is the youngest, away at school and slowly giving into doubts about the meaning of life. She becomes obsessed with a book that prompts her to pray away the ills of her life, only to fall victim to a nervous breakdown. Back at home, Zooey, the eldest brother in the family of seven, is worried sick over the state if his little sister. He is all too familiar with the way she feels, so much so that he feels impelled to explain to her the alienation as he tries to bring her around with a virtuous lecture on life. J. D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey is a keen take on life from two mutated perspectives. At once dark and witty, it's as provocative as it is entertaining.

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 13

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