Full Dark, No Stars

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Full Dark, No Stars

by Stephen King

Scribner | November 9, 2010 | Hardcover

Full Dark, No Stars is rated 4.5 out of 5 by 12.
"I believe there is another man inside every man, a stranger . . ." writes Wilfred Leland James in the early pages of the riveting confession that makes up "1922," the first in this pitch-black quartet of mesmerizing tales from Stephen King. For James, that stranger is awakened when his wife, Arlette, proposes selling off the family homestead and moving to Omaha, setting in motion a gruesome train of murder and madness.

In "Big Driver," a cozy-mystery writer named Tess encounters the stranger along a back road in Massachusetts when she takes a shortcut home after a book-club engagement. Violated and left for dead, Tess plots a revenge that will bring her face-to-face with another stranger: the one inside herself.

"Fair Extension," the shortest of these tales, is perhaps the nastiest and certainly the funniest. Making a deal with the devil not only saves Dave Streeter from a fatal cancer but provides rich recompense for a lifetime of resentment.

When her husband of more than twenty years is away on one of his business trips, Darcy Anderson looks for batteries in the garage. Her toe knocks up against a box under a worktable and she discovers the stranger inside her husband. It’s a horrifying discovery, rendered with bristling intensity, and it definitively ends a good marriage.

Like Different Seasons and Four Past Midnight, which generated such enduring films as The Shawshank Redemption and Stand by Me, Full Dark, No Stars proves Stephen King a master of the long story form.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 384 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 1 in

Published: November 9, 2010

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1439192561

ISBN - 13: 9781439192566

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! I have to admit that this is the only Stephen King book on my shelf, but when I saw it I knew I wanted to read it and I wasn't disappointed with what I found inside! All four stories in this collection were incredible. I would recommend this to anyone!
Date published: 2012-08-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from King is Awesome! Stephen King is a genius. How one man can be on top of the literary game for four decades and not lose his quality, edge or ideas is beyond me. 'Full Dark, No Stars" is a collection of short stories inpsired by the dark side of human nature. Do we truly know ourselves or the ones closest to us? No need for plot spoilers. Get this book now, it will stay with you long after you have finished the last page. I do not have a favourite story from the book as they were all equally good.
Date published: 2012-08-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from 4 short stories on 12 cd's The first story 1922 is set in Nebraska and tells a story of a father and son trying to live with the repercussions of their actions after the father convinces his very reluctant son to help him murder his wife (the boy’s mother) so they may be able to continue to live their lives in peace and quiet. Of course things do not go as planned and the consequences are tragic, if not horrifying. I found this story mediocre at best, with the plot being dragged out and the narration at times truly annoying. By contrast, the second story, Big Driver, is a fast paced tale of brutal violence and ensuing rage and revenge. An author, who, on her way home from a lecture, gets stranded on a dark, lonely road. A seemingly good samaritan who stops to help her turns out to be a psychotic brute that repeatedly rapes her and leaves her for dead. Her nerve racking escape and subsequent daring actions generates unrelenting suspense. Gripping! The third story, Fair Extension, is about a man who is dying of cancer who gets a chance to save himself at a most vicious cost. By far, the shortest story of the four and my third favourite. The fourth and last tale deals with a woman’s reaction and ensuing actions when she discovers her husband of 27 years is, horrifyingly , not the person she thought he was. Compelling and engaging, this deals with interesting aspects of human behaviour in extraordinary situations. Captivating till the very end.
Date published: 2012-02-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great intro to King's work! ***MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS*** Maybe it’s my age, maybe I’ve seen too many movies but I remember Stephen King to be a lot scarier. Of course the stories in his latest work–Full Dark, No Stars–are disturbing and some are downright gory (such as the opening work 1922), but scary? Nah. Don’t get me wrong, King is a great writer and a fantastic storyteller and the 4 short works in this book will definitely creep under your skin. In 1922 we meet a Depression-era husband, wife and son–happy family, though the wife drives the husband crazy. He wants to tend to the farm and read in the evenings; she wants to move to the big city and open a shop. Then she comes into land–a lot of land. This is probably the scariest story of the book which leads the reader through a journey as the husband deals with unintended consequences. In Big Driver we meet Tess, a writer of mystery novels who makes her income by doing monthly talks around her home base. These talks are usually quick and a steady source of income, until one day Tess decides to take a shortcut home and gets a flat tire. She’s tortured, raped and left for dead. Since she figures she’s a quasi-celebrity she takes matters into her own hands crafting her revenge. In Fair Extension we meet Streeter who has been diagnosed with cancer and doesn’t have much longer to live. One day he meets Edvil–rearrange the letters how you like–who changes his situation, giving Streeter 15 more healthy years–so long as Streeter transfers his bad luck onto a good friend. In A Good Marriage the reader is confronted with the question: How well do you know your spouse? A seemingly-happy couple is suddenly thrown out of their good marriage when Darcy finds one of her husbands secrets–a horrifying secret–in the garage on an innocent mission for batteries. These stories all deal with human nature and less about monsters and things coming back from the grave (hey, I saw Pet Cemetery YEARS ago and it still scares me!): What if you found a horrifying secret your spouse was trying to keep? What if you made a bad decision and it ended up haunting you until your dying day? What if you could take away pain and suffering, transferring that pain and suffering to a friend who seemingly has it all? What if you are faced with meeting the stranger inside you, the stranger you never knew existed? 3/5 stars–still, a great read for a rainy, thunderous night!
Date published: 2012-01-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Truly Amazing! When I read this book, I honestly didn't expect much from Stephen King. Some of his never books have caused me to drift away from reading his stories. I read the first short story (1922) and was totally captivated. It truly is Stephen King's best short story ever written. The other stories were, again, average from Stephen King. I think they could all become classics and be made into movies, but 1922 is one that I would like to see become extremely popoular and turned into a movie. If you were to buy one Stephen King book in 2012, let it be this one (or 11/22/63, both great reads)
Date published: 2012-01-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The "Old" King Style This has come closest to the original writing style King employed which, for me ended with Pet Sematary. Very enjoyable and a good read.
Date published: 2011-07-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Highly predictable If you have a chance to read, take it but I wouldn't seek this book out. The stories were predictable but made for easy reading on a summer day.
Date published: 2011-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from King is the King I just finished reading Full Dark, No Stars. Although there were some uncomfortable sections - and I had to put the book down to "get over" them - I was soon picking it back up to find out what happened. This is what I love about reading Stephen King's writing - he takes ordinary moments from ordinary lives (who hasn't thought "why can't the rich, handsome, successful friend have at least some of my bad luck?") and makes incredible stories from them. Each story pulls you in - you get to know the characters, feel their emotions, cheer them on or hang your head - they get inside your mind and you are part of the story. There is a fine line that King always manages to draw between reality and some other level of existence that works. While you are reading his stories, you believe that these things could happen to regular folks like us. I also very much enjoy the author's notes to us constant readers - I like hearing about where the kernal of an idea begins and spins into these incredible tales. Thanks Steve, for another great group of stories - keep 'em coming.
Date published: 2011-07-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Read I truely enjoyed this book. I loved Mr. King's past novel's alot more than his most recent ones. There have been a few recently that I was just totally bored with, however; through most of this novel I really found it hard to put this book down because I had to know what happened next. It was chilling and kinda gruesome in that classic Stephen King flair. Well done!
Date published: 2011-05-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I Love Stephen King!!!!! This was an awesome book of short stories, by Stephen King. The 2nd story seemed fimiliar to me, I know I've read a very similar story line somewhere eles before.....but it doesn't matter, the way Mr. King writes, he makes everything interesting, even a second time around. Definately a good book to read!!!!
Date published: 2011-02-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent As always Stephen King does not disappoint.
Date published: 2011-01-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from He's baaaack! The master author of everything dark is back! inside you'll find tales that show the dark side of the soul. There's even a wink to Leland Gaunt in the name of George Elvid...
Date published: 2010-12-08

– More About This Product –

Full Dark, No Stars

by Stephen King

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 384 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 1 in

Published: November 9, 2010

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1439192561

ISBN - 13: 9781439192566

About the Book

Following on the heels of his stunning #1 bestseller "Under the Dome," Stephen King delivers a new collection of four original never-before-published stories, all linked by the common theme of retribution.

Read from the Book

- 1 - The one thing nobody asked in casual conversation, Darcy thought in the days after she found what she found in the garage, was this: How’s your marriage? They asked how was your weekend and how was your trip to Florida and how’s your health and how are the kids; they even asked how’s life been treatin you, hon? But nobody asked how’s your marriage? Good, she would have answered the question before that night. Everything’s fine. She had been born Darcellen Madsen (Darcellen, a name only parents besotted with a freshly purchased book of baby names could love), in the year John F. Kennedy was elected President. She was raised in Freeport, Maine, back when it was a town instead of an adjunct to L.L.Bean, America’s first superstore, and half a dozen other oversized retail operations of the sort that are called “outlets” (as if they were sewer drains rather than shopping locations). She went to Freeport High School, and then to Addison Business School, where she learned secretarial skills. She was hired by Joe Ransome Chevrolet, which by 1984, when she left the company, was the largest car dealership in Portland. She was plain, but with the help of two marginally more sophisticated girlfriends, learned enough makeup skills to make herself pretty on workdays and downright eye-catching on Friday and Saturday nights, when a bunch of them liked to go out for margaritas at The Lighthouse or Mexican Mike’s (where there was live
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From the Publisher

"I believe there is another man inside every man, a stranger . . ." writes Wilfred Leland James in the early pages of the riveting confession that makes up "1922," the first in this pitch-black quartet of mesmerizing tales from Stephen King. For James, that stranger is awakened when his wife, Arlette, proposes selling off the family homestead and moving to Omaha, setting in motion a gruesome train of murder and madness.

In "Big Driver," a cozy-mystery writer named Tess encounters the stranger along a back road in Massachusetts when she takes a shortcut home after a book-club engagement. Violated and left for dead, Tess plots a revenge that will bring her face-to-face with another stranger: the one inside herself.

"Fair Extension," the shortest of these tales, is perhaps the nastiest and certainly the funniest. Making a deal with the devil not only saves Dave Streeter from a fatal cancer but provides rich recompense for a lifetime of resentment.

When her husband of more than twenty years is away on one of his business trips, Darcy Anderson looks for batteries in the garage. Her toe knocks up against a box under a worktable and she discovers the stranger inside her husband. It’s a horrifying discovery, rendered with bristling intensity, and it definitively ends a good marriage.

Like Different Seasons and Four Past Midnight, which generated such enduring films as The Shawshank Redemption and Stand by Me, Full Dark, No Stars proves Stephen King a master of the long story form.

About the Author

Stephen King was born in Portland, Maine, on September 21, 1947. After graduating with a Bachelor's degree in English from the University of Maine at Orono in 1970, he became a teacher. His spare time was spent writing short stories and novels. King's first novel would never have been published if not for his wife. She removed the first few chapters from the garbage after King had thrown them away in frustration. Three months later, he received a $2,500 advance from Doubleday Publishing for the book that went on to sell a modest 13,000 hardcover copies. That book, Carrie, was about a girl with telekinetic powers who is tormented by bullies at school. She uses her power, in turn, to torment and eventually destroy her mean-spirited classmates. When United Artists released the film version in 1976, it was a critical and commercial success. The paperback version of the book, released after the movie, went on to sell more than two-and-a-half million copies. Many of King's other horror novels have been adapted into movies, including The Shining, Firestarter, Pet Semetary, Cujo, Misery, The Stand, and The Tommyknockers. Under the pseudonym Richard Bachman, King has written the books The Running Man, The Regulators, Thinner, The Long Walk, Roadwork, and Rage. King is one of the world's most successful writers, with more than 100 million copies of his works in print. Many of his books have been translated into foreign languages, and he writes new books at a rate of about one per year.
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Editorial Reviews

“Just as gripping as his epic novels.”—St. Louis Post-Dispatch
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