How It Ended: New And Collected Stories

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How It Ended: New And Collected Stories

by Jay Mcinerney

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group | April 6, 2010 | Trade Paperback |

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From the writer whose first novel, Bright Lights, Big City, defined a generation, a collection of twenty-six stories, new and old, that trace the arc of his career for nearly three decades.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 416 Pages, 4.72 × 7.87 × 0.79 in

Published: April 6, 2010

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 030738795X

ISBN - 13: 9780307387950

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– More About This Product –

How It Ended: New And Collected Stories

How It Ended: New And Collected Stories

by Jay Mcinerney

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 416 Pages, 4.72 × 7.87 × 0.79 in

Published: April 6, 2010

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 030738795X

ISBN - 13: 9780307387950

About the Book

From the writer whose first novel, "Bright Lights, Big City," defined a generation, a collection of twenty-six stories, new and old, that trace the arc of his career for nearly three decades.

Read from the Book

The Madonna of Turkey Season It came to seem like our own special Thanksgiving tradition-one of us inevitably behaving very badly. The role was passed around the table from year to year like some kind of ceremonial torch, or a seasonal virus: the weeping and gnashing of teeth, the breaking of glass, the hurling of accusations, the final nosedive into the mashed potatoes or the shag carpet. Sometimes it even fell to our guests-friends, girlfriends, wives-the disease apparently communicable. We were three boys who''d lost their mother-four if you counted Dad, five if you counted Brian''s best friend, Foster Creel, who''d lost his own mother about the same time we did and always spent Thanksgiving with us-and for many years there had been no one to tell us not to pour that pivotal seventh drink, not to chew with our mouths open, not to say fuck at the dinner table. We kept bringing other women to the table to try to fill the hole, but they were never able to impose peace for long. Sometimes they were catalysts, and occasionally they even initiated the hostilities-perhaps their way of trying to fit in. My father never brought another woman to the table, though many tried to invite themselves, and our young girlfriends remarked on how handsome he was and what a waste it was. “I had my great love, and how could I settle for anything less?” he''d say as he poured himself another Smirnoff and the neighbor widows and divorcées dashed themselves against the windowpanes
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From the Publisher

From the writer whose first novel, Bright Lights, Big City, defined a generation, a collection of twenty-six stories, new and old, that trace the arc of his career for nearly three decades.

About the Author

The author of seven novels and two collections of essays on wine, Jay McInerney is a regular contributor to New York, The New York Times Book Review, The Independent and Corriere della Sera. His short fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire, Playboy, and Granta. In 2006, Time cited his 1984 debut, Bright Lights, Big City, as one of nine generation-defining novels of the twentieth century. He was the recipient of the 2006 James Beard Foundation's M.F.K. Fisher Award for Distinguished Writing and his novel The Good Life received the Prix Littéraire at the Deauville Film Festival in 2007. He lives in Manhattan and Bridgehampton, New York.

Editorial Reviews

“Extremely entertaining. . .  elegant, subtle, shapely and reflective. . . . Perfect specimens.” — The New York Times “ How It Ended reminds us how impressively broad McInerney’s scope has been and how confidently he has ranged across wide swaths of our national experience.... He possesses the literary naturalist’s full tool kit: empathy and curiosity, a peeled eye and a well-tuned ear, a talent for building narratives at once intimate and expansive, plausible and inventive.” —Sam Tanenhaus, The New York Times Book Review , front page “A master of short fiction…. The characters [McInerney] crafts are so strong, the reader continues to care about them after the last page is turned.” — The Miami Herald   “Brim[s] with all the attendant guilt and thrills and self-defeating impulses of an extramarital tryst…. Brilliant.” — The Boston Globe   “Fresh and smart…. Without losing his early jokey way with language or his ironic wit, [McInerney] finds new depths of understanding.” — The Oregonian   “McInerney''s star burns as bright as ever.” — Vanity Fair   “Immediately enveloping…. This collection highlights a powerful contemporary American writer.” — The Plain Dealer “Alongside old hits . . . [ How It Ended includes] an impressive selection of new work that touches upon his usual themes: mo
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