Hurry Hard: The Russ Howard Story

by Bob Weeks, Russ Howard

Wiley | February 23, 2007 | Hardcover

Hurry Hard: The Russ Howard Story is rated 5 out of 5 by 1.
“And again, I had to pinch myself. Could this all really be happening? Was it possible that I was now a gold medal winner at fifty?

“I had won many championships, world and Canadian championships, Ontario and New Brunswick championships. I had won hundreds of bonspiels and cashed scores of first-place cheques. I have a basement full of trophies and medals, but nothing could compare to the moment I was experiencing now; nothing could ever match the newest reward that was hanging from my neck.”

 From Hurry Hard, Chapter 1

It was a long journey for Russ Howard from his childhood in small-town <_st13a_state _w3a_st="on">Ontario to the pinnacle of the Olympic podium in <_st13a_city _w3a_st="on"><_st13a_place _w3a_st="on">Turin at the 2006 Winter Games. Worlds apart, separated by thousands of kilometers and over four decades, but joined by one remarkable curling career.

A career that started on a quiet, lonely rink in <_st13a_place _w3a_st="on"><_st13a_city _w3a_st="on">Midland, <_st13a_state _w3a_st="on">Ontario. Howard, coached by his father, developed a solid, consistent delivery at an early age. He loved practicing, where other youngsters loathed it, and for hour after lonely hour he honed his skills by throwing rock after rock on the rink at the Midland Curling Club. A natural skip from a young age, Howard was always drawn in by the strategy of the game. He relished the responsibility of throwing the last rock. For him, it was always exciting and thrilling to control the final shot of the game, where others were fearful or nervous. And for over three decades, it has been exciting and thrilling to watch him.

With award-winning journalist Bob Weeks, Russ Howard takes us on his personal journey through forty years of playing the game he loves: championships won and lost, the characters in the game, ever-changing teams and teammates, personal triumph and heartbreak, and an inside view of the curling world from one of the greatest in the sport.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 296 pages, 9.25 × 6.5 × 0.79 in

Published: February 23, 2007

Publisher: Wiley

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0470839554

ISBN - 13: 9780470839553

Found in: Biography and Memoir

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great curling read There should be more curling books like this one. Bob Weeks and Russ Howard combine to tell the story of Howard’s illustrious curling career climaxing with his unlikely Olympic gold medal win in 2006 at age 50. This book is several cuts above the sports book which aims to make a quick buck putting a superstar’s name on the covers and little of consequence between them. Weeks and Howard give the inside story on the many teams Howard has skipped, revealing some of the team dynamics. Particularly amusing is their account of Howard’s tense relationship with his one-time third, Bob Charlebois. They also tell of Howard’s battles with the Canadian Curling Association over team sponsorship, electronic on-ice communication, lousy arena ice and the free guard zone. The story is Howard’s, but Weeks has clearly made a much greater contribution than to serve as Howard’s stenographer. He has prodded the skip to recall key games he has probably more or less forgotten in order to construct a seamless narrative. One game that Howard no doubt does remember was his first Brier victory in 1987 over B.C.’s Bernie Sparkes. Howard and Weeks describe the game, first setting the scene by describing the efforts of B.C.’s imposing third Jim Armstrong to intimidate Howard. But Howard stood his ground against the big guy. In the game, Howard took a 6-4 lead into the ninth end, but then gave up three to B.C. Howard nervously recalled the previous year when he lost the Brier on his last rock and was tormented by people all summer long. But Sparkes was equally nervous, made several skipping mistakes in the last end. The whole tale is told in detail with the drama that it deserves. Except for more discussion about off-ice happenings at the Torino Olympics than I wanted to read, this is a book that held my interest from start to finish. As a diehard Westerner, I’ve never been a Howard fan. But this book gave me a much greater respect for the man and his accomplishments.
Date published: 2013-10-24

– More About This Product –

Hurry Hard: The Russ Howard Story

by Bob Weeks, Russ Howard

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 296 pages, 9.25 × 6.5 × 0.79 in

Published: February 23, 2007

Publisher: Wiley

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0470839554

ISBN - 13: 9780470839553

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements.

Chapter 1. The Pinnacle.

Chapter 2. The Start.

Chapter 3. From Boys to Men.

Chapter 4. Back to the Brier.

Chapter 5. First Win.

Chapter 6. New Rules, New Hope.

Chapter 7. New Directions.

Chapter 8. On Top Again.

Chapter 9.&#160; A World of Difference.

Chapter 10. On the Move.

Chapter 11. Me and the Kids.

Chapter 12. The Trials.

Chapter 13. Off to Italy.

Chapter 14. Let the Games Begin.

Chapter 15. Medal Hunt.

Index.

From the Publisher

&#8220;And again, I had to pinch myself. Could this all really be happening? Was it possible that I was now a gold medal winner at fifty?

&#8220;I had won many championships, world and Canadian championships, Ontario and New Brunswick championships. I had won hundreds of bonspiels and cashed scores of first-place cheques. I have a basement full of trophies and medals, but nothing could compare to the moment I was experiencing now; nothing could ever match the newest reward that was hanging from my neck.&#8221;

&#160;From Hurry Hard, Chapter 1

It was a long journey for Russ Howard from his childhood in small-town <_st13a_state _w3a_st="on">Ontario to the pinnacle of the Olympic podium in <_st13a_city _w3a_st="on"><_st13a_place _w3a_st="on">Turin at the 2006 Winter Games. Worlds apart, separated by thousands of kilometers and over four decades, but joined by one remarkable curling career.

A career that started on a quiet, lonely rink in <_st13a_place _w3a_st="on"><_st13a_city _w3a_st="on">Midland, <_st13a_state _w3a_st="on">Ontario. Howard, coached by his father, developed a solid, consistent delivery at an early age. He loved practicing, where other youngsters loathed it, and for hour after lonely hour he honed his skills by throwing rock after rock on the rink at the Midland Curling Club. A natural skip from a young age, Howard was always drawn in by the strategy of the game. He relished the responsibility of throwing the last rock. For him, it was always exciting and thrilling to control the final shot of the game, where others were fearful or nervous. And for over three decades, it has been exciting and thrilling to watch him.

With award-winning journalist Bob Weeks, Russ Howard takes us on his personal journey through forty years of playing the game he loves: championships won and lost, the characters in the game, ever-changing teams and teammates, personal triumph and heartbreak, and an inside view of the curling world from one of the greatest in the sport.

From the Jacket

Russ Howard is one of <_st13a_country-region _w3a_st="on"><_st13a_place _w3a_st="on">Canada&#8217;s curling legends. At the top of the game in the most dominant country in the sport, he is one of the world&#8217;s greatest curlers. In more than 30 years of competitive curling, he has won two Canadian championships, two World championships and has set records as a skip in the Brier&#8212;the annual national men&#8217;s championship&#8212;for appearances, games played and wins.

Yet something magical happened to Russ Howard at the age of 49, a time when most curlers are either past their prime or long gone from the game. He became an Olympian. The team of Brad Gushue, a player half Howard&#8217;s age and with teammates equally as young, asked the veteran to join the squad as a spare for the Olympic Trials. In a tale of serendipity, Howard would actually go on to play every game for the team, culminating in an Olympic gold medal&#8212;the first ever for <_st13a_country-region _w3a_st="on"><_st13a_place _w3a_st="on">Canada in men&#8217;s curling. Russ Howard, who started the Olympic Games as <_st13a_country-region _w3a_st="on"><_st13a_place _w3a_st="on">Canada&#8217;s oldest representative at age 49 and turned 50 during the competition, had achieved yet another milestone in his celebrated career.

Along with the magic, Howard has had his share of controversy in the sport. Over his long career, Howard has often been at the centre of heated battles with curling&#8217;s ruling body, from having headsets to communicate on the ice, to the fight for the right to wear sponsorship logos in national competitions. Through it all, he has been a star player and a builder of the game. Hurry Hard is the personal story of a Canadian sports legend, known for his triumphs and defeats on and off the ice; his battles with the Canadian Curling Association; his contributions to making the game more exciting offensively; the amazing gold-medal achievement; and, of course, his trademark yelling&#8230;Hurry Haaaaaard!

About the Author

Russ Howard has established himself as one of the most-celebrated curlers in the world in more than 30 years of curling, winning two Canadian championships and two World championships along the way, and setting records as a skip in the Brier – the annual national men’s championship -- for appearances, games played and wins. He contributed to building the game with an idea that put more offence into it and also fought for players’ right to wear sponsorship cresting in national competitions. Beyond all that, he became an Olympian—and turned 50—at the 2006 Winter Games in Turin, where Howard won Olympic gold as skip of Brad Gushue’s rink, the first-ever Olympic gold medal for Canada in men’s curling. Russ Howard is an Ambassador for Muscular Dystrophy Canada and the Canadian Liver Association.   Bob Weeks is the editor and co-publisher of the Ontario Curling Report , now in its thirty-first year of publishing. For 18 years, he has written a weekly column on curling in The Globe and Mail , while providing coverage of curling’s major events for Canada ’s national newspaper. He has written on curling for publications across Canada and is a regular commentator on both radio and television. He is a two-time winner of the Scotty Harper Award for the top curling story in Canada , and in 1995 he wrote The Brier: The History of Canada’s Most Celebrated Curling Championship , the first comprehensive history of that great eve
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