Inferno: A Novel

by Dan Brown

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group | May 14, 2013 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

Inferno: A Novel is rated 3.4242 out of 5 by 33.
In his international blockbusters The Da Vinci Code, Angels & Demons, and The Lost Symbol, Dan Brown masterfully fused history, art, codes, and symbols. In this riveting new thriller, Brown returns to his element and has crafted his highest-stakes novel to date.

In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history’s most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces . . . Dante’s Inferno.

Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science. Drawing from Dante’s dark epic poem, Langdon races to find answers and decide whom to trust . . . before the world is irrevocably altered.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: May 14, 2013

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385537867

ISBN - 13: 9780385537865

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Decent Read - But Not His Best After having read his previous novels, the formula he employs to construct his stories begins to wear thin after a while, which felt even more so apparent with Inferno. Although I was kept moderately captivated - a questionable ending, uneven pacing (the plot only truly starts to pick up with 100 pages left) and the predictability of some of the events that occur tarnished the otherwise charm of the novel that you can come to expect from a Dan Brown novel as he rather cleverly fuses art history with elements of conspiracy and cryptography once more.
Date published: 2014-08-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved It! Another great adventure! I always enjoy how Dan Brown weaves fact and fiction into his stories, introducing controversial ideas and leaving us guessing every step of the way. I really enjoyed everything about this book: the art, the cities, the plot, the characters, and regardless of whether you agree or disagree with how the book ends you're left thinking about what you've just read. Loved it.
Date published: 2013-12-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Typical This is the fourth Dan Brown novel I have read. In the past the trouble with his books was I could not put them down. I did not have that problem this time. While I enjoyed it, it was a tad boring at times. If you are a Dan Brown fan, read it otherwise take a pass.
Date published: 2013-12-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from easy read Fast paced, easy read, very descriptive. Enjoyed the "tour" of Florence and Venice. Interesting twist on bio-terrorism, definitely a political statement.
Date published: 2013-11-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Enjoyable, easy to read and even educational I don't have much to say. I still think his first book was the best (Angels and Demons), but Inferno is definitely an enjoyable "chase and learn" book. I read it while on vacation, and it was very easy to read and even somewhat educational - though I sometimes felt that Brown's need to use each and every thing that Langdon encounters in his chase of the "bad guy", as a learning opportunity for the audience - well that became a little tiresome, and I admit I skipped over some parts. All in all, it is classic Brown, and absolutely go ahead a read it..it is interesting and entertaining.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Boy am I Glad it's Over! This book isn't exactly what I expected. Although the storyline was interesting enough, I found the book long and boring. It took me almost 2 1/2 months to read this book and I have to say boy am I glad it's over! I've read other Dan Brown books that were fairly interesting and kept me reading, but this one, I don't know....it was just not worth my time.
Date published: 2013-10-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from What you expect from Dan Brown Much better than his previous book. By now we think we know all of Dan Browns tricks, however he still has a few left up his sleeve. The narrative keeps you guessing and the story makes you think about world problems.
Date published: 2013-08-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Expected Fun read but same ol' same ol' DB. I did enjoy ready about the locations though. GK
Date published: 2013-08-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from He's Back! After the last novel, the lost symbol, i was sure that this book was going to be a big disappointment... But i have to say that i loved this book and Dan Brown writes a story of great interest and suspense. It's not as good as Angels and Daemons or the DaVinci Code, but it's a lot more interesting than The Lost Symbol. The Plot is very interesting and is of current events. The Story takes place in places like Venice, Florence and Istanbul, so if you have ever visited any one of these cities you will feel right at home. They have already confirmed that Tom Hanks will be playing the role of Robert Langdon and that the movie is expected in 2014. A must for the Dan Brown fans!
Date published: 2013-07-30
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Glad to Finish This One Dan Brown is in a decline. After being disappointed by his last novel, Lost Symbol, I was hoping for a solid rebound with Inferno but I was left disappointed again. The story dragged in parts and he had too much 'filler' in this one. His endless descriptions of the city and pictures and meanings behind things took away from the plot and made it actually boring in parts. The main story was good but his book could have been 100 pages shorter and told the story just as well. I wouldn't say this is a bad book but it doesn't live up to the standards that he has set with 'Angels and Demons' and that 'other' famous book of his. Too bad.
Date published: 2013-07-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good story line but......... The story begins with Harvard Professor Robert Langdon waking up in a hospital in Florence with amnesia. With the help of a doctor Sienna Brooks, he flees away to her apartment only to discover that his jacket has been stitched with a device with biohazard warning based on Dante's Divine Comedy. With few clues from the device, Langdon and Sienna travels across the globe in order to unravel the mystery. Despite Langdon's proficiency in art history and Sienna Brooks with an IQ of 208, they find themselves entangled in a mystifying situation. Like in any other Dan Brown's book, the reader is taken for a ride for twists and turns which appears to be so convoluted. While executing the plots, Dan Brown alerts and reminds the readers with few global issues such as overpopulation and trans-humanism. Inferno is for sure a page turner, but then a detailed description of the attractions of Florence, Venice & Istanbul diverts and disturbs the reader from the main plot. Many a times it was like reading a travelogue of some of the European cities. As always, Dan Brown deserves much acclaim for his vast research on art history, symbols, geometric progression, human population growth, trans -humanism and so on… But then I was a bit disappointed when he misquoted the Hindu God Vishnu as a destroyer. According to Hindu scriptures, Vishnu is a protector and Shiva is a destroyer. Will Dan Brown reread the Hindu scriptures thoroughly before venturing out into his next book. Overall, it was a good story but definitely the writing and editing could have been much better….
Date published: 2013-07-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Captivating Dan Brown’s latest adventure has our favourite Harvard University professor matching wits with a genius obsessed with the divine-comedy “Dante’s Inferno”. The pace was a bit slow to start but picks up quickly and revs up to a stellar finale. The story lacks the little trivia nuggets that I’ve grown to love but there is a great deal of historical information on poet Dante Alighieri. The museums and churches of Italy come to life with vivid detail and the characters are captivating. It’s a mystery worthy of Robert Langdon.
Date published: 2013-06-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Enjoyed it but ... This is the fourth Dan Brown I have read and I always enjoy them, but he seriously needs to get a decent editor. He is a great storyteller but unfortunately not a great writer. His constant plot reminders are annoying and somewhat insulting and his use of italics to show each character's 'thoughts' are cringe-making. Brown is the literary equivalent of a MacDonalds burger - it feeds a craving, but ultimately leaves you unsatisfied. If all you want is a very quick interesting tale then his books are ideal, but have a well-written book lined up to read next. Will I read his next offering? Probably, he is somewhat of a guilty pleasure despite his many annoyances.
Date published: 2013-06-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Art-history 101 I gave this book 4 stars because I thoroughly enjoyed the history lesson I got about Dante, Dante's Divine Comedy, and Florence. I love reading fiction set in places I love to visit. On this note, Dan Brown did not disappoint. For the most part, I don't read his books for the plot, but more for the well-researched art history lessons imparted in such an entertaining way. The story itself is probably only worth about 3 stars. There was a bit too much dashing about and being chased, seemingly without a purpose known to the reader; followed by alot of "wrapping up" type of summarizing the events one couldn't possibly piece together on one's own. The ending also left something to be desired. All that said, I was entertained throughout, I learned a few things, the writing style was very accessible, and I would recommend Robert Langon's latest adventure to anyone who has ever visited (or wanted to visit) Florence, Venice, and Istanbul.
Date published: 2013-06-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Truly Infernal... A badly-written travelogue. It's as if every other page were lifted from Fodor's Florence, or istanbul, or wherever else the action ---I use the word loosely---is taking place. Because not much ever DOES take place. I have never liked Dan Brown's writing, but in the past I have soldiered through the end-of chapter cliff-hangers, the formulaic Oh-gosh-NOW-look-what's-happening! moments of tell, not show.... simply because his storylines have been intriguing. I confess to imagining Tom Hanks speaking Langdon's dialogue, and that helps a great deal. But nothing could save this one. The characters are wooden, the plot thin and unconvincing, the denouement contrived. Perhaps Brown is simply running out of ideas, or enthusiasm. I am fond of Robert Langdon as a character. I hope Brown gives him something more enticing and mystical and intellectually challenging to do in the next book. Otherwise, we shall part ways.
Date published: 2013-06-13
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Mediocre I was disappointed in Dan Brown's new book. I love his lessons in architecture, art, etc. But the book started out very similar to all the others. Langon and a girl on the run hiding from people at some point or another. Plot lines are similar, not the same but similar. Dante is an interesting subject but....I was bored with all the running and hiding going on. Same ole, same ole. Angels and Demons is by far his best book. I think he researches his books and the details are amazing but frankly I was a little bored with this book. Next book I'll wait for the reviews to start coming in before I buy it. I would wait for it to hit the sale table and I got it for 45% off. Not a waste of time, just nothing new.
Date published: 2013-06-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Robert Langdon #4 “Inferno” sucked me in at page one. I love Dan Brown’s books. He takes me completely away into another world of adventure…and puzzles. The most lovely thing about reading this book is that Florence is one of my favourite cities. I’ve been to many places mentioned in the novel…and had a the most ultimately amazing hot chocolate at Caffe Rivoire in the Piazza della Signoria…a café that Langdon mentions. I’ve heard “Inferno” described as a scavenger hunt…which is extremely accurate! Once I started reading I couldn’t put it down. Another great Robert Langdon book.
Date published: 2013-06-12
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Great at Storytelling, Bad at Endings Another disappointment Mr. Brown! He is an exceptional storyteller and in this book does his usual to grab the reader's attention from the very first page. However, the ending lacks the finesse and flare of the content leading up to the finale. I found the same disappointment with The DaVinci Code and The Lost Symbol. Disappointing endings :( I'd buy used or borrow from the library, regretting having paid full price.
Date published: 2013-06-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Another phenomenal book from Dan Brown! Not only is this another amazing lesson on history, literature and architecture, but it touches on a very current and highly troubling societal issue. And of course, the fast pace and surprise points in the novel are in keeping with Dan Brown's well-loved style. Personally, I loved all of Dan Brown's books and this one was no exception: an awsome journey from the first page to the last!
Date published: 2013-06-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent Read! The wonderfully worded illustrations of Florence, Dante et al was refreshing to read. Brown brought all the subject matter to life. As I read through the book, I could visualize Tom Hanks in the leading role and it made the read even more enjoyable. Hopefully a movie will also be produced starring Hanks!
Date published: 2013-06-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A very entertaining read! A bit more science and a little less mysticism than Dan Brown's other novels but still a great read.
Date published: 2013-06-04
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not Dan Brown's best I thoroughly enjoyed the book in the beginning. His descriptions of Florence and Venice made me feel like I was back there taking in the sights. Maybe it is because I have read all his novels that I was expecting more. While reading the final chapters I was anticipating a big twist but it didn't happen. Angels and Demons is still his best!
Date published: 2013-06-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent reading This book was great! Non stop action, very interesting, could not put it down. Can' wait for his next book!
Date published: 2013-06-04
Rated 2 out of 5 by from "Not" Brown's best by Far! I was disappointed in this book as it seems Dan Brown wrote this book for the sake of writing one (probably pushed by his publishers). His 4 previous books I could not put down and was always seating of the edge. This book is very precitable and unsuspenseful. However, it was very apparent that the research into the science and history of Dante were thorough and deep, which will create an interest in Dante, Florence and Venice.
Date published: 2013-06-03
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Meh This book has substance, but not as good as what we've seen. There was more about the science and less about the mysetery/problem solving that kept us interested in previous books. I would suggest getting the ebook, borrowing from a friend or waiting for paperback. Not worth the full cover price of the hardcover.
Date published: 2013-06-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not bad This book was enjoyable, and in typical Dan Brown fashion, it is hard to put down. However, it has really lost the magic of the first two novels. I felt as if it were written with the specific purpose of being made into a movie, rather than as a book for itself. You will likely not be raving about this book, but you won't hate it!
Date published: 2013-06-02
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Deception point Although it is true that one of Dan Brown’s strength as an author is his “postcard style” writing that always leave you on the edge of your seat at every chapter end making it a page-turner, here the whole story plot is nothing but the same old recipe that has been applied to his previous novels. The result is a highly predictable story where the magic of his other books doesn't work as well as before. This may be due to the fact that Langdon’s amnesia, although it makes him appear more human and more vulnerable that in his three last adventures, has a tendency to slow down the rhythm of the story to the point of overstretching it. Moreover, the coincidences become too numerous making everything that happens appear too easy as if it had all been prearranged. Furthermore, unlike his past novels where the story revolved around a mystery with roots that were set deep into the past and which had a secret society linked to it, here the story plot is entirely contemporary aside solely for the reference to Dante’s Divine Comedy, Inferno and all the artwork that it inspired. Even his view on the subject of the global problem that is overpopulation (which isn't often openly spoken of) and its imagined mean to attend to it is tinted with a moralistic, if not condescending, tone. Ergo the point that he tries to make of its importance goes unnoticed. All in all, if you liked Dan Brown’s other books and are a die-hard fan of his work, you may have a good time reading this one as it is exactly like his others. As for me, it’s a miss. For more about this book and others, visit my blog at: ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-06-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic! Naysayers Beware. This book is a great ride through Dante's Inferno and it delivers. Robert Langdon is once again a great hero for the times and you will be reading this book non-stop. No need for plot spoilers. It is entertaining, suspenseful and a huge improvement from Dan Brown's last outing. I already cannot wait for his next book.
Date published: 2013-05-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Another great book from Dan Brown While Angels and Demons is STILL my favorite in the series, this title ranks right up there with The Davinci Code. After the let down I got from the Lost Symbol, I was wary to try this book, but the same time, super excited, and I'm glad it didn't let me down. Right from the start the book was packed full of action and it never stopped until you reach the end of the book. Twists and turns all over the place. Just a really, really great read.
Date published: 2013-05-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Brown sure does his research! Dan Brown's ability to envision a complicated plot and weave it through gorgeous locales, and to relate it to the first part of Dante's "Divine Comedy", Inferno, is amazing. Hero, Robert Langdon, is thrust into a madman's solution to world overpopulation. Not knowing who to trust, he must try to find and neutralize that before it is too late. Too bad there aren't pictures of the stunning buildings he races through, and the art he encounters. Though I must admit that, at times, my mind wandered since some parts are more travel brochure than story. The ending lacked the drama it seemed headed toward. However,mostly an enjoyable read. And I really want to visit Florence, Italy!
Date published: 2013-05-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from It's quite the ride! I'm a huge Dan Brown fan, so receiving this book for Mother's Day, had me anxiously waiting for it's release. True to Mr. Brown's style of writing, he weaves a wonderful story of intrigue and mystery that keeps you turning the pages. What I absolutely LOVED about this story is that it takes place in cities/countries that I have recently visited in the past 3 years. The whole story played out in my mind, actually seeing all the landmarks he describes. This was such a vistual book for me. I waited until this past long weekend to allow myself to be absorbed into the history of this book. (I might ready Dante next!!) If I had to be critical about anything...the end result/outcome of the story, although very plausible, left me emotionally distressed that resulted in more questions rather than letting the story find a natural ending. Still... a fantastic read!
Date published: 2013-05-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A MUST READ FOR DAN BROWN FANS Robert Langdon wakes up in a Florence hospital … a bullet wound to his head, IV tubes sticking out of him, machines beeping and absolutely no memory of the last 48 hours other than he feels a need to apologize, muttering “very sorry, very sorry” over and over again. As he tries to clear the fog in his head a black clad intruder breaks into his hospital room, shoots his doctor … and the chase is on. Racing against the clock (isn’t he always?) he must decipher a series of secret messages left for him to stop a world-wide pandemic from being released. After hearing the news that this book was coming out (I was quite thrilled) and learning that it was based on Dante’s Inferno I felt that I should try to read Dante’s work so I could have a firmer grasp on the references in Mr. Brown’s Inferno. True confession time – I just couldn’t get through it. I tried. I really did try. Nope – couldn’t do it. But to any of you out there who, like me, are not much into classic epic poetry, no worries, you can get through Dan Brown’s book just fine! I’m not even going to get into a discussion about “literature” vs. “pop fiction”. I read for enjoyment so can find redeeming qualities in all kinds of books in all kinds of genres and yes, I think best sellers deserve 5 stars too. The bottom line is I enjoyed this book, as I did all his other books. I like Langdon as a character because he has an “absent minded professor” feel to him. He’s a brilliant symbologist who likes his quiet Harvard life and he is always boggled by how he gets into all these sticky situations but then manages to plod through by putting one foot in front of the other. Are the situations a little unbelievable … of course! Its an action thriller fiction book. Some of the negative criticisms of Mr. Brown’s book stem from the fact that he stops the action sometimes to offer Professor Langdon a chance to do mini-lectures on either his surroundings or the art work that is prevalent in all his books. These little mini-lectures are part of the appeal of the books for me. I have never been to Florence, or Rome, or Venice or Istanbul so the description of the artwork; the history and the architecture enthrall me. I’ve even googled things in the books to get a visual about what he is talking about. Okay, I’m a geek. Not only that, but OMG, there was even some scientific “stuff” in this book that was thought provoking, a little scary and posed a moral dilemma for not only the book’s characters but in my mind as well. If that’s not an all around good read, what is?
Date published: 2013-05-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A wild ride! A great read! One could liken it to waiting in a train station and jumping onto a train that's already travelling at 200kph. However, just as you gain your balance and and adjust to the speed, the train takes a few sharp bends and thrashes you about the bar car. Read this one with an internet accessible device to search the location and art described in the book for a truly interactive experience.
Date published: 2013-05-19

– More About This Product –

Inferno: A Novel

by Dan Brown

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: May 14, 2013

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385537867

ISBN - 13: 9780385537865

From the Publisher

In his international blockbusters The Da Vinci Code, Angels & Demons, and The Lost Symbol, Dan Brown masterfully fused history, art, codes, and symbols. In this riveting new thriller, Brown returns to his element and has crafted his highest-stakes novel to date.

In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history’s most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces . . . Dante’s Inferno.

Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science. Drawing from Dante’s dark epic poem, Langdon races to find answers and decide whom to trust . . . before the world is irrevocably altered.
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