Influence Of Darwin On Philosophy

by John Dewey

PROMETHEUS BOOKS | December 31, 1990 | Audio Book (Cassette) |

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Preeminent American philosopher and educator John Dewey (1859-1952) rejected Hegelian idealism for the pragmatism of William James.

In this collection of informal, highly readable essays, originally published between 1897 and 1909, Dewey articulates his now classic philosophical concepts of knowledge and truth and the nature of reality. Here Dewey introduces his scientific method and uses critical intelligence to reject the traditional ways of viewing philosophical discourse. Knowledge cannot be divorced from experience; it is gradually acquired through interaction with nature. Philosophy, therefore, has to be regarded as itself a method of knowledge and not as a repository of disembodied, pre-existing absolute truths.

Format: Audio Book (Cassette)

Dimensions: 320 Pages, 5.51 × 8.27 × 0.79 in

Published: December 31, 1990

Publisher: PROMETHEUS BOOKS

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1573921378

ISBN - 13: 9781573921374

Found in: Reference

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Influence Of Darwin On Philosophy

Influence Of Darwin On Philosophy

by John Dewey

Format: Audio Book (Cassette)

Dimensions: 320 Pages, 5.51 × 8.27 × 0.79 in

Published: December 31, 1990

Publisher: PROMETHEUS BOOKS

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1573921378

ISBN - 13: 9781573921374

From the Publisher

Preeminent American philosopher and educator John Dewey (1859-1952) rejected Hegelian idealism for the pragmatism of William James.

In this collection of informal, highly readable essays, originally published between 1897 and 1909, Dewey articulates his now classic philosophical concepts of knowledge and truth and the nature of reality. Here Dewey introduces his scientific method and uses critical intelligence to reject the traditional ways of viewing philosophical discourse. Knowledge cannot be divorced from experience; it is gradually acquired through interaction with nature. Philosophy, therefore, has to be regarded as itself a method of knowledge and not as a repository of disembodied, pre-existing absolute truths.

About the Author

John Dewey was born in 1859 in Burlington, Vermont. He founded the Laboratory School at the University of Chicago in 1896 to apply his original theories of learning based on pragmatism and "directed living." This combination of learning with concrete activities and practical experience helped earn him the title, "father of progressive education." After leaving Chicago he went to Columbia University as a professor of philosophy from 1904 to 1930, bringing his educational philosophy to the Teachers College there. Dewey was known and consulted internationally for his opinions on a wide variety of social, educational and political issues. His many books on these topics began with Psychology (1887), and include The School and Society (1899), Experience and Nature (1925), and Freedom and Culture (1939).Dewey died of pneumonia in 1952.
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