King of the World: Muhammed Ali And The Rise Of An American Hero

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King of the World: Muhammed Ali And The Rise Of An American Hero

by David Remnick

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group | September 15, 1999 | Trade Paperback

King of the World: Muhammed Ali And The Rise Of An American Hero is rated 4.5 out of 5 by 2.
"Succeeds more than any previous book in bringing Ali into focus . . . as a starburst of energy, ego and ability whose like will never be seen again." —The Wall Street Journal

"Best Nonfiction Book of the Year" —Time

"Penetrating . . . reveal[s] details that even close followers of [Ali] might not have known. . . . An amazing story." —The New York Times

On the night in 1964 that Muhammad Ali (then known as Cassius Clay) stepped into the ring with Sonny Liston, he was widely regarded as an irritating freak who danced and talked way too much. Six rounds later Ali was not only the new world heavyweight boxing champion: He was "a new kind of black man" who would shortly transform America''s racial politics, its popular culture, and its notions of heroism.
        
No one has captured Ali--and the era that he exhilarated and sometimes infuriated--with greater vibrancy, drama, and astuteness than David Remnick, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lenin''s Tomb (and editor of The New Yorker). In charting Ali''s rise from the gyms of Louisville, Kentucky, to his epochal fights against Liston and Floyd Patterson, Remnick creates a canvas of unparalleled richness. He gives us empathetic portraits of wisecracking sportswriters and bone-breaking mobsters; of the baleful Liston and the haunted Patterson; of an audacious Norman Mailer and an enigmatic Malcolm X. Most of all, King of the World does justice to the speed, grace, courage, humor, and ebullience of one of the greatest athletes and irresistibly dynamic personalities of our time.

"Nearly pulse-pounding narrative power . . . an important account of a period in American social history." —Chicago Tribune

"A pleasure . . . haunting . . . so vivid that one can imagine Ali saying, ''How''d you get inside my head, boy?''" —Wilfrid Sheed, Time

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 352 pages, 7.98 × 5.18 × 0.67 in

Published: September 15, 1999

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0375702296

ISBN - 13: 9780375702297

Found in: Sports

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from outstanding David really did an amazing job writing this book. He put himself into the legends shoes and told the story like it was his own experience. All i could say as a reader is cheers to an amazing accomplishment.
Date published: 2006-01-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Book I had no idea that the early stage of Ali's career was so interesting. This book details the most interesting points of Ali's fights vs Liston. It also gives the reader true knowledge regarding Patterson, Malcolm X, The Gangsters, and others who played a role in the life of Ali.
Date published: 2002-03-20

– More About This Product –

King of the World: Muhammed Ali And The Rise Of An American Hero

by David Remnick

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 352 pages, 7.98 × 5.18 × 0.67 in

Published: September 15, 1999

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0375702296

ISBN - 13: 9780375702297

Read from the Book

HYPE The promoter of the Liston-Clay fight was William B. MacDonald, a former bus conductor who had made so great a fortune that he now got around in two Rolls-Royces and a fifty-foot cruiser named Snoozie. MacDonald was born in Butte in 1908, the descendant, he said, of generations of sheep thieves. There being few sheep to steal in Butte, he came to Miami and made his money in the parking business, then in laundry and dry cleaning, then in restaurant management, trucking, mobile homes, and a mortgage company based in San Juan. He married a Polish woman named Victoria and, just for fun, bought a stud farm in Delray Beach and a Class D baseball team called the Tampa Tarpons. MacDonald handed out gold cuff links like Chiclets. He lived in a quarter-million-dollar house in Bal Harbour and retained an assistant named Sugar Vallone, late of the bartending trade. His generosity as a father was unparalleled. He built his daughter a tree house with drapes and carpeting matching the main house, and for his daughter''s eighth birthday he installed a jukebox in the tree. Bill MacDonald had a good time. He smoked his cigars and ate his steaks. He played golf and decorated his walls with the many marlin he had pulled out of the Atlantic. On the golf course, driving his cart, he held a Coke in his right hand and a root beer in his left, and steered with his forearms and his belly. He was very fat. MacDonald had enjoyed his experience so far in the boxing business. He made some money, if n
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From the Publisher

"Succeeds more than any previous book in bringing Ali into focus . . . as a starburst of energy, ego and ability whose like will never be seen again." —The Wall Street Journal

"Best Nonfiction Book of the Year" —Time

"Penetrating . . . reveal[s] details that even close followers of [Ali] might not have known. . . . An amazing story." —The New York Times

On the night in 1964 that Muhammad Ali (then known as Cassius Clay) stepped into the ring with Sonny Liston, he was widely regarded as an irritating freak who danced and talked way too much. Six rounds later Ali was not only the new world heavyweight boxing champion: He was "a new kind of black man" who would shortly transform America''s racial politics, its popular culture, and its notions of heroism.
        
No one has captured Ali--and the era that he exhilarated and sometimes infuriated--with greater vibrancy, drama, and astuteness than David Remnick, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lenin''s Tomb (and editor of The New Yorker). In charting Ali''s rise from the gyms of Louisville, Kentucky, to his epochal fights against Liston and Floyd Patterson, Remnick creates a canvas of unparalleled richness. He gives us empathetic portraits of wisecracking sportswriters and bone-breaking mobsters; of the baleful Liston and the haunted Patterson; of an audacious Norman Mailer and an enigmatic Malcolm X. Most of all, King of the World does justice to the speed, grace, courage, humor, and ebullience of one of the greatest athletes and irresistibly dynamic personalities of our time.

"Nearly pulse-pounding narrative power . . . an important account of a period in American social history." —Chicago Tribune

"A pleasure . . . haunting . . . so vivid that one can imagine Ali saying, ''How''d you get inside my head, boy?''" —Wilfrid Sheed, Time

From the Jacket

"Succeeds more than any previous book in bringing Ali into focus . . . as a starburst of energy, ego and ability whose like will never be seen again."--"The Wall Street Journal
"Best Nonfiction Book of the Year"--"Time
"Penetrating . . . reveal[s] details that even close followers of [Ali] might not have known. . . . An amazing story." --"The New York Times
On the night in 1964 that Muhammad Ali (then known as Cassius Clay) stepped into the ring with Sonny Liston, he was widely regarded as an irritating freak who danced and talked way too much. Six rounds later Ali was not only the new world heavyweight boxing champion: He was "a new kind of black man" who would shortly transform America''s racial politics, its popular culture, and its notions of heroism.
No one has captured Ali--and the era that he exhilarated and sometimes infuriated--with greater vibrancy, drama, and astuteness than David Remnick, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lenin''s Tomb (and editor of The New Yorker). In charting Ali''s rise from the gyms of Louisville, Kentucky, to his epochal fights against Liston and Floyd Patterson, Remnick creates a canvas of unparalleled richness. He gives us empathetic portraits of wisecracking sportswriters and bone-breaking mobsters; of the baleful Liston and the haunted Patterson; of an audacious Norman Mailer and an enigmatic Malcolm X. Most of all, King of the World does justice to the speed, grace, courage, humor, and ebullience of one of the greatest athletes and irresistibly dynamic personalities of our time.
"Nearly pulse-pounding narrative power . . . an important account of a period in American social history." --"Chicago Tribune
"A pleasure . . .haunting . . . so vivid that one can imagine Ali saying, ''How''d you get inside my head, boy?''" --Wilfrid Sheed, "Time

About the Author

David Remnick was a reporter for The Washington Post
for ten years, including four in Moscow. He joined The
New Yorker as a writer in 1992 and has been the magazine’s
editor since 1998. Remnick served as an Olympic
Correspondent and Commentator for NBC
during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics.

From Our Editors

Float like a butterfly; sting like a bee. He shook the world of sports with his arrogance, and by the end of his career he transcended the realm of sport. In 1964, Cassius Clay stepped into the ring against Sonny Liston as an irritating freak, and left as world heavyweight boxing champion and a new kind of black man. In King of the World, David Remnick captures Muhammad Ali and the era he dominated like no other, as he charts Ali's rise from the gyms of Louisville to his greatest championship fights.

Editorial Reviews

"By now we all have our notions about what Ali meant -- to his time and to the history of his sport. Of course David Remnick sheds light on these subjects, but where King of the World really shines is in the ring itself. With telling detail, Remnick captures the drama, danger, beauty, and ugliness of a generation''s worth of big heavyweight fights." -- Bob Costa
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