Legends Of Our Time

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

Legends Of Our Time

by Elie Wiesel

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group | April 6, 2004 | Trade Paperback |

Not yet rated | write a review
A collection of tales immortalizing the heroic deeds and visions of people Wiesel knew during and after World War II.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 208 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.39 in

Published: April 6, 2004

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0805211756

ISBN - 13: 9780805211757

Found in: History

save
5%

In Stock

$19.95

Online Price

or, Used from $5.04

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

All available formats:

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Legends Of Our Time

Legends Of Our Time

by Elie Wiesel

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 208 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.39 in

Published: April 6, 2004

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0805211756

ISBN - 13: 9780805211757

From the Publisher

A collection of tales immortalizing the heroic deeds and visions of people Wiesel knew during and after World War II.

About the Author

Born in Sighet, Romania, Elie Wiesel was the son of a grocer. In 1944 he and his family were deported, along with other Jews, to the Nazi death camps. His father died in Buchenwald and his mother and his younger sisters at Auschwitz. (Wiesel did not learn until after the war that his older sisters had also survived.) Upon liberation from the camps, Wiesel boarded a train for Western Europe with other orphans. The train arrived in France, where he chose to remain. He settled first in Normandy and later in Paris, where he completed his education at the Sorbonne (from 1948 to 1951). To support himself, he did whatever he could, including tutoring, directing a choir, and translating. Eventually he began working as a reporter for various French and Jewish publications. Emotionally unable at first to write about his experience of the Holocaust, in the mid-1950s the novelist Francois Mauriac urged him to speak out and tell the world of his experiences. The result was La Nuit (1958), later translated as Night (1960), the story of a teenage boy plagued with guilt for having survived the death camps and for questioning his religious faith. Before the book was published, Wiesel had moved to New York (in 1956), where he continued writing and eventually began teaching. He became a naturalized American citizen in 1963, following a long recuperation from a car accident. Since the publication of Night, Wiesel has become a major writer, literary critic, and journalist. As a writer steeped in
read more read less
Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart