Lord of the Rings 3 Return of the King

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Lord of the Rings 3 Return of the King

by J.R.R. Tolkien

Harpercollins (uk) | January 31, 1999 | Mass Market Paperbound

Lord of the Rings 3 Return of the King is rated 4.6364 out of 5 by 11.

Impossible to describe in a few words, JRR Tolkien?s great work of imaginative fiction has been labelled both a heroic romance and a classic fantasy fiction. By turns comic and homely, epic and diabolic, the narrative moves through countless changes of scene and character in an imaginary world which is totally convincing in its detail. Tolkien created a vast new mythology in an invented world which has proved timeless in its appeal.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 560 pages, 7.13 × 4.5 × 1.55 in

Published: January 31, 1999

Publisher: Harpercollins (uk)

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0261102370

ISBN - 13: 9780261102378

Found in: Epic

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from A wonderful conclusion! You have no idea how excited I was at the thought of nearing the end of this trilogy. I have lived and breathed The Lord of the Rings for four months now, and couldn’t wait to finally say I had completed it. This last novel was everything I thought it would be: fast-paced (at least Book 5 was, the story following Aragorn), interesting and, oddly enough, romantic. I absolutely loved seeing the relationship between Eowyn and Faramir unfold before my eyes, but was slightly disappointed when Tolkien merely thrust the love between Aragorn and Arwen at my feet without any prior inclination of a romance between them. On the whole, though, I thought this was the best book of them all. What irks me about Tolkien, however, is the fact that he always builds up to the battles with endless pages of journeys and discussions; but when it comes right down to the battle itself, he only writes about a page on it. The battle scenes always fall flat. But in the epic battle between the Black Rider and Eowyn, it was written with more description than any other battle. I could see her courage, her greatness and her love for her family and people and was rooting for her from start to finish. I grew to love Eowyn more than any other person (other than Sam) in the novel, and wanted nothing but happiness for her at the end. She was the fearless character the trilogy needed. But more interestingly, I was intrigued by the fact that she couldn’t save her people without dressing up as a man first, as if being a woman wasn’t good enough. In today’s society, feminism and female power is almost second-nature to us. We’re used to seeing female leaders now and figureheads; so it was cool to see how Tolkien’s world viewed women differently. I don’t blame Tolkien for creating a story where men were the primary characters (as some people do); instead, I thank him for showing the strength women can have in times of trouble. We’re not all damsels in distress. Anyways, I’m digressing. Simply put, I liked The Return of the King a lot more than I thought I would. After The Two Towers, finishing this series seemed like an impossible task — and I admit, a few times throughout the last novel I thought I would just give up altogether. Many people did give up, so why should I feel bad? But the important thing is that I didn’t. I kept reading and when Frodo and Sam finally reached Mount Doom, I couldn’t have been happier. Gollum played his part well, and while I did think his ending was a little anti-climatic, he did provide a reasonable and satisfying end to the One Ring. The part of The Shire in turmoil caught me by surprise because it wasn’t in the movie, but I liked how it wasn’t just a perfect ending for the hobbits. Nothing in life is perfect, and I liked how The Shire wasn’t perfect throughout the various wars and battles. Saruman saw to that. His death was a little strange and abrupt… I would have preferred if he had lived but withered away. On the whole, I was pleased by this concluding novel and I am beyond thrilled to say I have, once and for all, completed The Lord of the Rings series! To view more of my book reviews, visit: http://booksteame.com/
Date published: 2013-05-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Epicness at its finest A great ending to the trilogy, I finished reading the novel the same day I bought it! This is a must read for any active reader.
Date published: 2012-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Oh my goodness These books were mighty hard to get through. I'm glad I read them though and it's something I consider a literary accomplishment for myself. And Sam is really gay.
Date published: 2010-06-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from BEST BOOK EVER! This was the best book I have ever read. This book had so much detail, it made me feel that I was actually in the story. I recommend this book and the others in the trilogy as well.
Date published: 2006-06-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from simply amazing Even though my title is Simply Amazing , there is no word great enough to describe this book. In crude fashion, I shall say what has always been said about it: it is a masterpiece, perhaps the greatest masterpiece of all time besides the Bible. I cannot begin to describe it. A must read.
Date published: 2005-12-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Book The Return of the King is a triumphant end to an amazing trilogy. Filled with amazing characters and sudden twists and turns. This book also contains important life messages if you look hard enough. Anybody who likes adventure, fantasy, or made up languages would love this book.
Date published: 2005-05-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The End JRR Tolkien's The Return of the King was a book full of action, humour loyalty. It was an excellent end to the wonderful and well-known series, The War of the Ring. It sums everything up from the series, so I would not recommend reading it unless you have read the others, it would be extremely difficult to understand as the plot is very fast-moving. If you enjoyed reading The Hobbit, or other fantasy books, then this series would suit your tastes. This book basically tells us what happened to the characters. My personal favourite were two characters, Legolas and Aragorn. Aragorn for his bravery and ironic nature, Legolas for the sheer smoothness of every movement. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I did.
Date published: 2003-12-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from number one!!! the greatest book ever written.
Date published: 2003-02-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from cowboy After reading the first two parts of Lord of The Rings, I was awaiting a great ending. Much to my surprise Return of the King SUCKED. In Fellowship and Towers you keep reading about Sauron and Mount Doom and when Frodo get there it is one chapter. Gimli name is mentioned once and the last few chapters were so boring that I wanted to throw the book away but didn't because I knew I would feel guilty. However I would still say Return of the King is a must read only because it is the conclusion to maybe the greatest story ever told. But don't get your hopes up.
Date published: 2002-12-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from EXCELLENT I finished the trilogy a month ago and was taken by the friendship and survival of the story, The Return of the King finishes the epic adventure. I loved every minute of it. A real need to read. ~*peace out*~
Date published: 2002-05-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent I couldn't put it down. It was amazingly written, and a very unexpected ending to the trilogy. I recommend it to anyone, even if you haven't seen the beautifully similar movie.
Date published: 2002-03-09

– More About This Product –

Lord of the Rings 3 Return of the King

by J.R.R. Tolkien

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 560 pages, 7.13 × 4.5 × 1.55 in

Published: January 31, 1999

Publisher: Harpercollins (uk)

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0261102370

ISBN - 13: 9780261102378

From the Publisher

Impossible to describe in a few words, JRR Tolkien?s great work of imaginative fiction has been labelled both a heroic romance and a classic fantasy fiction. By turns comic and homely, epic and diabolic, the narrative moves through countless changes of scene and character in an imaginary world which is totally convincing in its detail. Tolkien created a vast new mythology in an invented world which has proved timeless in its appeal.

About the Author

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was born on the 3rd January, 1892 at Bloemfontein in the Orange Free State, but at the age of four he and his brother were taken back to England by their mother. After his father?s death the family moved to Sarehole, on the south-eastern edge of Birmingham. Tolkien spent a happy childhood in the countryside and his sensibility to the rural landscape can clearly be seen in his writing and his pictures. His mother died when he was only twelve and both he and his brother were made wards of the local priest and sent to King Edward?s School, Birmingham, where Tolkien shone in his classical work. After completing a First in English Language and Literature at Oxford, Tolkien married Edith Bratt. He was also commissioned in the Lancashire Fusiliers and fought in the battle of the Somme. After the war, he obtained a post on the New English Dictionary and began to write the mythological and legendary cycle which he originally called The Book of Lost Tales but which eventually became known as The Silmarillion. In 1920 Tolkien was appointed Reader in English Language at the University of Leeds which was the beginning of a distinguished academic career culminating with his election as Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. Meanwhile Tolkien wrote for his children and told them the story of The Hobbit. It was his publisher, Stanley Unwin, who asked for a sequel to The Hobbit and gradually Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings, a huge story that t
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From Our Editors

The end of Frodo’s journey with his company of dwarves culminates in an unforgettable climax in this third and final book of the Lord of the Rings series. J.R.R. Tolkien’s Return of the King shows the author reaching his imaginative peak in this last installment. A true saga comes to rest after the book is closed.
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