Love In The Time Of Cholera

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Love In The Time Of Cholera

by Gabriel García Márquez

October 5, 2007 | Trade Paperback

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In their youth, Florentino Ariza and Fermina Daza fall passionately in love. When Fermina eventually chooses to marry a wealthy, well-born doctor, Florentino is devastated, but he is a romantic. As he rises in his business career he whiles away the years in 622 affairs--yet he reserves his heart for Fermina. Her husband dies at last, and Florentino purposefully attends the funeral. Fifty years, nine months, and four days after he first declared his love for Fermina, he will do so again.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 368 pages, 3.15 × 2.01 × 0.3 in

Published: October 5, 2007

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0307389731

ISBN - 13: 9780307389732

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– More About This Product –

Love In The Time Of Cholera

by Gabriel García Márquez

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 368 pages, 3.15 × 2.01 × 0.3 in

Published: October 5, 2007

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0307389731

ISBN - 13: 9780307389732

Read from the Book

IT WAS INEVITABLE: the scent of bitter almonds always reminded him of the fate of unrequited love. Dr. Juvenal Urbino noticed it as soon as he entered the still darkened house where he had hurried on an urgent call to attend a case that for him had lost all urgency many years before. The Antillean refugee Jeremiah de Saint-Amour, disabled war veteran, photographer of children, and his most sympathetic opponent in chess, had escaped the torments of memory with the aromatic fumes of gold cyanide. He found the corpse covered with a blanket on the campaign cot where he had always slept, and beside it was a stool with the developing tray he had used to vaporize the poison. On the floor, tied to a leg of the cot, lay the body of a black Great Dane with a snow-white chest, and next to him were the crutches. At one window the splendor of dawn was just beginning to illuminate the stifling, crowded room that served as both bedroom and laboratory, but there was enough light for him to recognize at once the authority of death. The other windows, as well as every other chink in the room, were muffled with rags or sealed with black cardboard, which increased the oppressive heaviness. A counter was crammed with jars and bottles without labels and two crumbling pewter trays under an ordinary light bulb covered with red paper. The third tray, the one for the fixative solution, was next to the body. There were old magazines and newspapers everywhere, piles of negatives on glass plates, broken
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From the Publisher

In their youth, Florentino Ariza and Fermina Daza fall passionately in love. When Fermina eventually chooses to marry a wealthy, well-born doctor, Florentino is devastated, but he is a romantic. As he rises in his business career he whiles away the years in 622 affairs--yet he reserves his heart for Fermina. Her husband dies at last, and Florentino purposefully attends the funeral. Fifty years, nine months, and four days after he first declared his love for Fermina, he will do so again.

From the Jacket

"This shining and heartbreaking novel may be one of the greatest love stories ever told." --The New York Times Book Review

"A love story of astonishing power…. Altogether extraordinary." --Newsweek
 
"Brilliant, provocative…magical…splendid writing." --Chicago Tribune
 
"Beguiling, masterly storytelling…. García Márquez writes about love as saving grace, the force that makes life worthwhile." --Newsday
  
"A sumptuous book…[with] major themes of love, death, the torments of memory, the inexorability of old age." --The Washington Post Book World

About the Author

Gabriel García Márquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia, in 1927. He attended the University of Bogotá and went on to become a reporter for the Colombian newspaper El Espectador. He later served as a foreign correspondent in Rome, Paris, Barcelona, Caracas, and New York. Winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982, he is the author of several novels and collections, including No One Writes to the Colonel and Other Stories, The Autumn of the Patriarch, Innocent Erendira and Other Stories, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, The General in His Labyrinth, Strange Pilgrims, Love and Other Demons, and most recently, Memories of My Melancholy Whores, as well as the autobiography Living to Tell the Tale.

Editorial Reviews

"This shining and heartbreaking novel may be one of the greatest love stories ever told." --The New York Times Book Review

"A love story of astonishing power…. Altogether extraordinary." --Newsweek
 
"Brilliant, provocative…magical…splendid writing." --Chicago Tribune
 
"Beguiling, masterly storytelling…. García Márquez writes about love as saving grace, the force that makes life worthwhile." --Newsday
  
"A sumptuous book…[with] major themes of love, death, the torments of memory, the inexorability of old age." --The Washington Post Book World

Bookclub Guide

US

1. Why does García Márquez use similar terms to describe the effects of love and cholera?

2. Plagues figure prominently in many of García Márquez's novels. What literal and metaphoric functions does the cholera plague serve in this novel? What light does it shed on Latin American society of the nineteenth century? How does it change its characters' attitudes toward life? How are the symptoms of love equated in the novel with the symptoms of cholera?

3. What does the conflict between Dr. Juvenal Urbino and Florentino Ariza reveal about the customs of Europe and the ways of Caribbean life? How is Fermina Daza torn between the two?

4. Dr. Urbino reads only what is considered fine literature, while Fermina Daza immerses herself in contemporary romances or soap operas. What does this reveal about the author's attitude toward the distinction between "high" and "low" literature. Does his story line and style remind you more of a soap opera or a classical drama?

5. After rejecting Florentino's declaration of love following her husband's funeral, why is Fermina eventually won over by him?

6. Why does a change in Florentino's writing style make Fermina more receptive to him?

7. What does Florentino mean when he tells Fermina, before they make love for the first time, "I've remained a virgin for you" (p. 339)?

8. Why does Florentino tell each of his lovers that she is the only one he has had?

9. What does Florentino's uncle mean when he says, "without river navigation there is no love" (p. 168)?

10. Do Fermina and Dr. Urbino succeed at "inventing true love" (p. 159)?

11. Set against the backdrop of recurring civil wars and cholera epidemics, the novel explores death and decay, as well as love. How does Dr. Urbino's refusal to grow old gracefully affect the other two characters? What does it say about fulfillment and beauty in their society? Does the fear of aging or death change Florentino Ariza's feelings toward Fermina Daza?

12. Compare the suicide of Jeremiah de Saint-Amour at the beginning of the book with that of Florentino's former lover, América Vicuña at the end. How do their motives differ? Why does the author frame the book with these two events?

13. Why is Leona Cassiani "the true woman in [Florentino's] life although neither of them ever knew it and they never made love" (p. 182)?

14. When Tránsito Ariza tells Florentino he looks as if he were going to a funeral when he is going to visit Fermina, why does he respond by saying, "It's almost the same thing" (p. 65)? (Used by permission of Penguin Books.)

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