Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children

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Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children

by Ransom Riggs

Thorndike Press | August 22, 2012 | Hardcover

Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children is rated 3.9737 out of 5 by 38.
A New York Times Bestseller -- In an unforgettable novel that mixes spine-tingling fiction with haunting photography, a horrific tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob on a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine''s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned rooms, it becomes clear that Miss Peregrine''s children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. And somehow -- they may still be alive.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 484 pages, 8.5 × 5.7 × 1.1 in

Published: August 22, 2012

Publisher: Thorndike Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1410450236

ISBN - 13: 9781410450234

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from mrs.pedgrines home for peculiar children I just wanted to say to all you people who did not finish this book that yes it does start out slow but it speads up and gets really good also if you did not finish this book yoy have no fuckin right to rate it because you did not read this whole book and for all you know it could get really good like when jacob finds out that he is a peculiar opps! Spoiler alert!
Date published: 2014-12-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from amazing read One of the best books I have read and to all you idiots who think the olny good part is the pictures I think you either do not know how to read or are an asshole who has no taste in books.and yes I rate this 5 stars because it was so awsome I stayed up one whole night reading it and could not put it down
Date published: 2014-12-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from loved it! I've been eyeing Miss Peregrine's for a while now. Every time I'd see it at a bookstore, I'd want to grab it but wasn't sure how I'd like it. It's one of those books that's gotten quite the hype but at the same time there's a lot of people who didn't like it. I quickly skimmed through the synopsis but didn't pay too much attention to it and just dived into it right away. One of the things that I enjoyed about this book is that it didn't have a prolonged and boring beginning. It was easy to get into and didn't take long to finish. The story is told from Jacob's POV, a 16-year old who doesn't have many friends and is generally unhappy about his lifestyle. As the book progresses, we see him turn into someone who's stronger and can defend himself within a matter of weeks. The story itself is quite strange and I do applaud Ransom for it because I definitely didn't predict anything when I first started reading. My favourite part of the book would definitely have to be the photographs! At the end of the book, it mentions that all the photos are actual real vintage photos that were collected by these people who would scour flea markets and old shops looking for peculiar photos! How cool is that? This book was definitely something unique and I enjoyed every bit of it! The only issue I had, which I think is the reason why some people didn't enjoy the book, is that after finishing the book, I went back and read the synopsis again and to be honest, I feel that it is overly exaggerated. It's hard to explain why without giving away the plot, which can't be discussed without spoiling the story. In the synopsis, it mentions that the pictures are "haunting" and that the Peculiar Children are possibly dangerous and have been quarantined. After reading the book, I realize that these words are slightly true but I still wouldn't really consider this book to be a thriller. It falls somewhere in between the YA and Middle Grade genre, so honestly how scary do you think it would be? Not much, as assumed, so if you're going into the book looking for a haunting book, this is not it. This is a paranormal yet it's not life-scarring. So my suggestion would be to ignore the synopsis and ignore the hype and just get into it right away. Enjoy it for what it is because I truly did! Oh and just to show how much I loved it, I ended up picking up Hollow City the moment I finished Miss Peregrine's.
Date published: 2014-12-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Attention Adventure Seekers: A novel you'll never forget! “I used to dream about escaping my ordinary life, but my life was never ordinary. I had simply failed to notice how extraordinary it was.” (Riggs, 347). These were Jacob’s first words after he realized the truth about his grandfather and that collection of incredibly peculiar photographs. In this fiction novel, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs, sixteen-year-old Jacob sets out on a journey to an island just off the coast of Whales. While he’s there, he discovers something that changes his life forever. One of my favourite things about this novel was that I could not put it down! There were so many different twists in every chapter and the love story the author added in made it even better! Also, it was as if you were in the story yourself because it really pulls you in! Another thing I like was that this novel really opened up my mind to new things. I feel like the author was trying to show that there’s a lot going on in the world that you aren’t aware of and there’s so much left to discover. Over all, I think this book would please adults and teens the most, but really anyone who would want to read an exciting adventure novel would definitely fall in love with this one. Although this book was sometimes hard to follow because of how different it is from other novels, it is still one of the best books I’ve ever read!
Date published: 2014-05-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome Book! Strongly Recommend it! It kept me turning the pages late into the night! The pictures add to the amazing story that is being told.
Date published: 2014-04-01
Rated 2 out of 5 by from An unpopular opinon From the description of the book and the pictures in it, I was expecting this book to be way more thrilling and I guess a little more "scary". I was really excited to read this book and in the end was kind of disappointed in the whole book. I will likely not be reading the second one. 
Date published: 2014-03-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very imaginative!!! I loved this book! It has such a creative storyline that I couldn't help get caught up in it right from the beginning. I definitely recommend it!!!!!
Date published: 2014-02-11
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Disappointing I received this book from my wife at Christmas. I had zero expectations as I had never heard of it before. The concept seemed pretty cool. The thing I liked: the pictures. The things I didn't like: uninteresting characters. Yes I know some can fly, super strength etc etc. but they are extremely flat, boring characters. I never knew which was which when they were referred to by name because they are so forgettable. Slow story. Literally nothing happens as 3/4 of the book is like groundhog day. Lastly (I have this problem with a lot of books) is the poor writing of younger characters. 
Date published: 2014-02-10
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not what I expected I had this book on my wish list. It looked interesting... but then I started to read it and never did finish it. I was terrible. Slow. Odd. Disappointing. The photographs were the best part of the book. I really wanted to like it, and I can read almost anything, but I had to give up on this one.
Date published: 2014-01-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wow In this intricately plotted novel, a young man searches for the truth to the tall tales he assumes are fiction after witnessing the gruesome death of his grandfather. This search leads him to a strange island that has a bomb scarred orphanage that doesn't seem to be empty, and a some monsters that seem to be fact and not the fairy tale that he has always assumed. Interspersed with some wonderful photographs, it makes for a very compelling read that may seem to start slow, but ends up in a wonderful mix of fantasy and mystery.
Date published: 2013-06-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Super Cool Book Love this book! If I'm being COMPLETELY honest, the story itself is probably only worth 3 stars, but the pictures and the idea of using them to illustrate the story brings it up to 5 for me. The story isn't as creepy as it is advertised, but that's okay. Some of the old photos are so incredibly cool, they really add depth to the story. I can't wait for the sequel!
Date published: 2013-05-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Being a Teenager has it's Trials Sixteen year old Jacob Portman just wanted to be fired from his job at the pharmacy. He hated it that his uncles had other plans; they intended for him to work in the family empire, not caring what Jacob wanted to do. What he wanted was to spend more time with his grandfather. He would reflect back on the magical stories he used to tell him when he was young. A floating girl, and invisible boy, and many other impossibilities. It was easy to believe these when he was little, but now, an older and wiser Jacob knew better. That didn't stop him from adoring Grandpa Abe. One day at work, Jacob received a frantic call from his grandfather telling him that the monsters were coming for him. Jacob rushed to his side, but he was too late. Abe laying dying, torn open by what the police later confirmed was a wild animal attack. With his final breaths, he told Jacob to find the bird and mumbled some other cryptic details. Even with the help of counselling, Jacob was not able to let go of his grandfather's horrific death. Finally, he convinced his parents that he needed to travel to the remote Welsh island where his grandfather had lived in a children's home for war orphans. There he hoped to find some clue to Abe's final message. I listened to the audio book version of this twice in the past few months. The second time I enjoyed it so much better than the first. This second time I was able to enjoy the wealth of detail, while the first time I was so busy trying to follow the story and time lines. This was read by Jesse Bernstein. 9 hours 42 minutes. From Books on Tape. The descriptions were so vivid and the voices so well done, that I was able to visualize each of the children and photographs that Jacob looked at periodically throughout the story. It was only later that I learned that the paper version shows the discussed photos and even images of the 'letters' which Jacob reads. In this novel, we find that it's not easy being a teenager no matter the time period. Jacob has to deal with bullying at school, yet his grandfather had to deal with a war and with the monsters he keeps talking about. Then there are the other children at the home, they have to deal with the isolation from their families as well as from a normal relationship with the rest of the population of the island. Spoiler Alert: There is only one tiny thing that bothered me in this book, and it is not something that the target audience of 14+ would notice. Emma leads Jacob down into a sunk boat. They are at least twelve feet underwater, and Emma picks up a hose, clears the water from it with a little puff of air and starts breathing. Then she hands the hose to Jacob and he breaths from it. As a trained scuba diver, this isn't going to work. As I said, this is a small thing, and I wasn't going to let it stop me from fully enjoying this book. End of Spoiler Alert On his website, Ransom Riggs indicated that he is working on a follow up to this book which he plans to have ready at some point in 2013.
Date published: 2012-12-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A work of art wrapped in an intricate story! Jacob grew up listening to his grandfather Abe's stories of fantastical and harrowing adventures, most stemming from the orphanage he grew up in - Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. How peculiar exactly are these children? Just judging from the photos on the covers - things get really weird. I had seen this book at the bookstore several times, and I was always creeped out by the photos and the premise doesn't give much away. It wasn't until I actually bought the book and really looked at it that I noticed the girl on the cover is levitating, it just made me all that more excited to find out what was going on. Our main character Jacob loved his grandfather Abe and his stories about the war, and the unique children he befriended at the orphanage he grew up in with their unusual abilities. But like any child, he got older and became increasingly skeptical about how real these stories could be. It's incredible how we rationalize everything, even when there's real physical photographic proof in front of us and Jacob is no different. But when his grandfather dies in a horrific accident, Jacob starts to question his sanity while plagued with nightmares and his grandfather's last request. Piecing the fragments of his grandfather's life together, Jacob ends up on a remote isle off the coast of Wales to search for answers - but he soon gets sucked into a world full of wonders and dangers he couldn't even begin to imagine. Grandfather Abe completely reminds me of Grandpa Abe from The Simpsons. He tells war stories, and each time the version changes a little bit and it gets wilder and couldn't possibly be true. Soon relatives start brushing him off and thinking he's not that mentally stable anymore. But boy are you in for a surprise when the truth about Abe's life is uncovered and how hard he tried to the very end to fend off the things that go bump in the night. This book is definitely a work of art; from the eerie photos to the end papers, to the in between chapter papers and the handwritten letters - it's all gorgeous and makes this an enveloping and engaging read. Although I don't think I'll ever be able to look at the photos for more than a few seconds - it feels like their unblinking eyes are just boring into your soul, even after we get to know some of these peculiar children. The story immediately draws you in with the photos, and Abe's unfortunate end, but then it lulls a bit as Jacob struggles to figure things out. But Riggs does an excellent job contrasting Jacob's life before and after these life altering events so that when he does find the orphanage he easily fits in and it just feels right that he's there. However, for me this is where the story shifted gears completely. It was no longer a creepy mystery and I just didn't feel as invested in the story as I did before. It turns into a superheroes unite to save the world kind of situation and while I still wanted to know what happens, the last half of the story ends up as a predictable set up for the sequel and left a lot of questions unanswered. This story definitely has a unique and intriguing plot bolstered by old fashioned photos (and apparently they're all real?) and I generally enjoyed it. I had expected a lot of suspense and horror, but I never really got apprehensive at any point. It was like listening to your grandfather tell you a story and just watching it all unfold safely from a distance.
Date published: 2012-10-31
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fantastic story based on real bizarre photographs Jacob has grown up with his grandfather Abe’s outlandish stories and had become more and more skeptical as he got older. When Abe dies in a bizarre circumstance, Jacob tries to piece together his grandfather’s life and have some closure with the traumatic event by travelling to the island that Abe had grown up on. The most striking thing about this book is that the story is written from actual bizarre black & white photographs. The origins and circumstances behind these pictures may be known or not, but Riggs has concocted an amazingly fluid narrative that ties these together. It was amazing to think that these photos actually already existed and weren’t taken for the purposes of the book. I actually had no idea what to expect with this book prior to picking it up. The cover looked creepy, and I was intrigued. The story that develops between the covers is so well thought out and so much more than just a collection of “bizarre photos”. I felt it a bit reminiscent of Big Fish, where one may think another’s stories have been so embellished through the years that the truth of it has been lost. That journey to find the origin of those outlandish stories is what Miss Peregrine’s reminded me of. The cast of personalities that Riggs has created are so vivacious and full of character that they really fit with the images. You felt like you were actually seeing photos of the people he was describing. While the plot does take an unexpected turn, a twist that’s even stranger than the photos, it does leave it open for a future installment, which is tentatively slated for June 2013. This, and other reviews can be found on JustALilLost.com
Date published: 2012-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Unnfathomably delightful. Ransom Riggs is what i like to refer to as my 'soul author'. When he describes a scent, however putrid or rank, it wafts up my nostrils. When he describes the creaking of the stairs or the run-down nature of a structure, i see it, feel it give, and worry myself above the potential cave in. He is pure unaltered, awesome. This story is both enchanting and completely bizarre, though at the same time inspiring. I recommend. I truly do. 17 stars. It was a joy ride.
Date published: 2012-08-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Why the hype? I apologize in advance for any jumbled up words. I am rather in a conflicted state of mind. I'm in love with how the book is set upped and I am feeling rather guilty for giving it 4 stars. My reasoning is down below... I've been looking for a great supernatural read that didn't involve the typical Big Four: vampires, werewolves, faeries and angels. So when I saw this book on Goodreads, I knew i had high hopes it. Peculiar. Oh how this reminds me of the GONE series by Michael Grant. It's paranormal fiction without those over-done Big Four. Every one of the peculiar children grew on me and made me care for them. It's like visiting a museum when I look at their pictures. I picture what was going on in their heads? What had been said and done before the pictures were taken? Like with almost every other book I have read, the main character was not my favourite and yet he was tolerable and I even connected with him at times. So I give a high five to the author for that! :) I loved the pictures that were partnered up with the story. As mentioned above, it brought into a state where I had to study every single one and take in every single detail. I loved the way it made me felt. This book dealt with the pass, during the Second World War. I've always loved stories which have taken in that era and this one pulled me right in. And when it was in the present day, I thought the book did very well to illustrate a foreign country for me. I felt equally mystified by the present setting as I did for the past. The reason this book lost one star for me was because I felt at times I could not stay entertained. I was looking forward to learning more about every one of the peculiars and yet it never came. I guess I was sort of hoping for a deeper incite to the past lives of all of the peculiars and it wasn't the route the author took. I felt my interest grow at parts and sank at others, so would have to give this book 4 stars. P.S.: THE ENDING WAS VERY TOUCHING AND YOU ALL KNOW HOW I LOVE 'EM PECULIARS. I felt that at the very end, I got to know all of them a bit better an it made me appreciate this book.
Date published: 2012-08-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from It was interesting I found the beginning choppy, a little sluggish. Not sure if that's the best way to describe it. In the end I really got caught up in the story and wanted to see what would happen. I'm not 100% sure, but I don't believe there is a follow up to this book and thinking back, I think its the best thing to do for these characters. It's not my usual type of book, but I enjoyed the imagery and would recommend it if someone asked about it... Not the first book that would come to mind if someone asked "what should I read"
Date published: 2012-08-02
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I wasn't captivated The hole story is pretty hard to read, I mean , when you look at the pictures it's like a bit crazy in a way of mental illness(not talking about the author) and for some people, it's hard to read about these type of things. The biggining made me wonder what wil happen next, but after getting on the island, things took the down road. Every single page made me want to put the book down, there was no action for so long and when action came, it didn't make up for all the other chapters that left me yawning. On the bright side, the pictures really fit in with the whole scenario. The book would be better off made out of pictures.
Date published: 2012-07-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Peculiar I originally borrowed this book from a friend, I got a quarter ways through and stopped. The book scared me a little but I kept wondering about the ending, and what would happen. I eventually bought the book and i'm very glad that I did. It is incredibly well written and I'd recommend it to nearly anyone. Read it slowly and make sure to enjoy it!!(:
Date published: 2012-07-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic Book! I loved this book! It left me wanting more like any good book should!
Date published: 2012-07-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Facinating Concept, Great Story This was such a fascinating book to read. I was immediatly drawn in by the spooky, odd pictures, and the dust jacket review. This is a great story about loss, life, and the things that really matter. I absolutely fell in love with the main character, Jacob. The story and characters were very well written. the mystery and intrigue were paced very well. I cant wait for more from Ransom Riggs.
Date published: 2012-06-11
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Absolutely Boring!! I read this book even though there were mixed reviews, some thought this book was horrifying and others thought it was okay. I really struggled to complete this book, the story line was dull, the pictures were the best part of the book. The writer would have been better off just creating a picture book. I do not recommend this book to anyone and I will read just about anything but this book made me fall asleep.
Date published: 2012-06-01
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Interesting and unique! Obviously, I’m not a stickler for detail, because it wasn’t until I started reading Ransom Riggs’s book Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children that I realized the little girl pictured on the cover is actually floating. Even though I didn’t notice this small detail, I was still immediately intrigued by this book because of the spooky looking cover. Everything — from the picture, to it being printed in black and white, to the fonts and design — drew me in. It was cover-love at first sight. That being said, this wasn’t my favourite book. I don’t want to knock it down or anything, but my favourite thing about this book was the cover design and the layout and design of the innards of the book — the pages devoted to the beginning of each chapter, the almost vintage quality of the entire book, and — most of all — the inclusion of the creepy photos throughout the novel. Miss Peregrines Home for Peculiar Children is a book about Jacob, a 15-year-old boy who’s best friend is his grandpa. He doesn’t lead the best life — his parents are wealthy, owning a chain of pharmacies across Florida, and one day Jacob will own it. But he’s not thrilled about it. His life seems to be lacking excitement, except for when he sits with his grandpa, who tells him stories of his past. These stories revolve around an orphanage on a mysterious island; an orphanage where he had quite the variety of friends, from a girl who could float, to one who can conjure up fire, to another who is invisible. When Jacob’s grandpa dies, Jacob convinces his dad to take him to the island where his grandfather grew up, in the hopes that he can find the orphanage and learn more about his grandpa — and the mysterious way he died. For me, when I think about the story itself, I think the first half of it was the strongest. I loved the stories from Jacob’s grandpa, and the descriptions of the kids at the orphanage. I was creeped out by the inclusion of the photos, but thought they were incorporated well for the most part. Riggs’s writing isn’t too difficult, it was almost like reading a Percy Jackson novel — I liked the main character and the adventures he was undertaking. The story itself wasn’t creepy, which is what I expected from the cover and from the synopsis on the front flap. I felt like this book could have been extremely creepy, had Riggs went that route. The photos were one of my favourite parts of the book — some were quite tame, others spine-tingling creepy and weird — but I really think they could have done more for the story. Photos of kids at the orphanage were mentioned by Jacob’s grandpa, but then these kids weren’t anywhere else in the novel. It’s almost like Riggs chose the safer kids to actually incorporate into the bones of the novel — rather than some of the creepier ones introduced earlier in the book. There were also some inconsistencies with the photographs — certain characters were meant to be the same person in multiple photos, but didn’t look anything like they did in a previous photo. There’s romance in this book, but I felt it was unnecessary. I don’t want to spoil anything for future readers, but my thought was that the romance was both unnecessary and just a little morbid. It’s a romance that could’ve just been a good friendship — I think it may have worked a little better that way. The end of the book is set up for a sequel, which I have mixed feelings about. I felt that the book was almost too long and went in the complete opposite direction from where I was expecting it to go. I also felt it could have been a solitary book, rather than one with more sequels. Especially if Riggs wants to incorporate more photos — I’m just not sure how he’ll do that because with this first instalment, the great thing about the photos was that they were in the past. Of course, I am intrigued, somewhat, by where Riggs is going with this story, so I do look forward to reading the next one. I hope the next book is just as lovely designed as the first.
Date published: 2012-03-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderfully Written and Intriguing I absolutely love this book, and couldn't put it down for a second. Out of all the characters I must say Millard was my favorite for no real reason at all. In all favor, I think that this book deserves and encore, and should be on everyone's wish list. I love the fact that there is some kind of forbidden romance between the leading male and female, and it gives you a new aspect of what to expect from it. I am a young author to be, I believe I'm excellent at what I do and write, and hopefully I'll be able to create something incredible; just like what Ransom Riggs did with Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. Excellent work Mr. Riggs :D
Date published: 2012-02-26
Rated 3 out of 5 by from "intriguing, fun and a mystery" i initially asked for this book as part of my christmas wish list, but when i was at chapters and was flipping through the pictures terrified me. i decided against it months later i was going through books at chapters and i saw it again. i decided to check out the reviews on chapters website. the reviews were good and many recommendations. i decided well this book has always intrigued me. i bought it and started reading it right away before bed. the pictures gave me the creeps!! i had to go to work the next day and stick post its on the some of the pics. Ex: girl at the pond, twins in costumes, etc. once i started reading the book captured my attention right away. it reminds me of xmen and hellboy. when someone looks at a picture it is interpreted different ways. this is definitely true in this case. i found the pics creepy, but with Riggs interpretations the pics made sense. a boy out to find the truth about these mysterious pictures and secrets that will set him free. great peculiar characters- i had my faves- olive (she's a cutie) and horace. a really fun book to get lost in. enjoy every moment and peculiarity of all the characters and story. the author did a great job using pictures and creating an imaginative story. creative, original and adventurous. i could not wait to read the next page. i definitely recommend this book. original concept and adventurous trip into the world of miss peregrines home for peculiars. i think i want to go there...
Date published: 2012-02-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Incredible first novel. I could not be more amazed by Rigg's first novel. Will definitely be reading his next novel, and look forward to it. Pictures were incredibly interesting and helped to further captivate the reader. Intensely written, and a wonderful first novel.
Date published: 2012-01-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Brilliant and haunting I found this book through my library's website and didn't know that it contained photos throughout the story. I thought it was really neat how the author found the photos and then wrote about them as opposed to adding photos as an after thought. Reading the book I got shivers down my spine. The concept of it was not very terrifying but the way the author wrote the book was in a very mysterious and haunting way. It was a lovely read and one of my favourites. The story and the characters were all very real, too. My favourite thing about it was looking through the photos and realizing that they came before the book, that they were real people who lived their own lives, and that the photos were probably never taken for the artist's sake. Although some do look like darkroom tricks, the emotions are real. This book is a work of art.
Date published: 2012-01-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wow! What an amazing surprise! This book was a thrill a minute. Totally fun from the beginning to the end. I loved it and recommend it to all.
Date published: 2011-12-30
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Didn't like it This books seemed like the author had come across a stack off odd photos, though it was cool, and brainstormed on how he could fit the pictures into a story. The storyline lacked depth and character building. Liking/ being liked by your grandfathers ex-girlfriend is not okay. If your grandfather dated a 20 year old, you have to be seriously disturbed to want to date her after he's done. It took effort to make it through this book, the whole time I kept hoping it would get better but it never did. The pictures obviously came before the storyline and that's why this book failed in my eyes.
Date published: 2011-12-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Delectably Creepy! This is the only book that I remember which has spooked me in my teenage years and adulthood. Not in the spasm-at-any-movement kind of way, but in a way that I would sometimes wonder what was beyond the limits of my vision, then find myself automatically locking my car doors - just in case. Riggs brings back that nostalgic childhood fear of the Bogeyman, but in an indirect way - as if he were slowly, teasingly pulling a thread of congealed terror through the dusty years from the keyhole of your childhood closet. Somehow the thread also catches up those imaginary friends you'd forgotten, twining together two core factors of childhood: the basic fear of the unknown, and the unlimited and compelling power of imagination, spun with adventure and a coming-of-age challenge for the protagonist. Personally I find that when fictional books include photographs, they are incongruous in some way to the whole package. However, these photographs and sketches weave themselves in the story extremely well, and they stick in your mind's eye far longer than is comfortable (which is the point, since they are vintage photographs of the "peculiar" children - and they are, indeed, peculiar.) I would even go so far as to say that without them the book just would not have been as effective, even though the story and style of narration could stand alone. I couldn't put the book down, and even brought it to work with me. I would definitely recommend this for anyone of any age group!
Date published: 2011-12-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Eerie photographs + excellent storyline I originally didn't want to get this book because of the creepy cover, but I'm glad I did. This book is fast paced (I literally couldn't put this book down, except for going to sleep) and the cliffhanger ending makes me assume there will be sequel. The characters are all original and unique, and there is no section of the book that is even slightly boring. A lot of action, suspense and mystery makes up this story, and I will honestly recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading, regardless of the genre they like. In addition, throughout the book are actual photographs that enhance the quality of the book. Personally, I don't have that great of an imagination, and the pictures really helped to visualize things. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children is one of my favourite novels of all time.
Date published: 2011-12-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from An eerie and fast paced read Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs was the October book club pick here at Gin and Rhetoric. The consensus, from the feedback on both the facebook page and, gasp, in real life, was that the book was fantastic. It is a YA title but, like any good YA book, it has lots of appeal outside of the intended audience. In fact everyone that I know that has read it is over 25, with the exception of my niece, who is 12. The story revolves around sixteen–year–old Jacob. Jacob was very close with his grandfather when he was little. His grandfather would tell him amazing stories of battling monsters and of the fantastic children he knew in his youth. Children that had very special (think X–Men–type) gifts. As Jacob got older, he began to realize the stories that his grandfather told him couldn’t be anything more than fairytales made up to intrigue and frighten him. But, when his grandfather is brutally murdered, Jacob begins to believe that the stories he had been told in his youth were true. Thus, Jacob sets off on a mission to discover who his grandfather really was In Miss Peregrine’s Ransom Riggs sets up what is sure to be an amazing series. The story takes place both in the past and in the present, and the transitions between World War II and present day Wales are crafted seamlessly. The characters and the plot are strong and well developed. The genuinely unique thing about this book, and I’m pretty sure that most people would agree with me on this, is Riggs’ use of photographs. Ransom Riggs has been a collector of vintage photographs for some time, he wrote a little piece for the Huff Post about his collection that includes a sampling of some of the amazing photos he used in the book. The selections from his collection that were used in the book are phenomenal, I found that they really gave me pause, even outside of the context of the book. You can’t help but think “what’s the deal with that picture? How did it come to be taken, and who were those people?” That is definitely not to say that they detract, or distract the reader from the story. They don’t at all. My musings took place after I was finished the story and was flipping back through the photos. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is a great story on its own, but that story is fortified and made even more compelling through Riggs’ effective use of photographs. The one thing about the story that drove me crazy was the ending. Don’t worry, this isn’t a spoiler. It’s just that the book ends as an obvious set up for the next book in the series, so as a reader you’re left dying to know what happens next. I guess that’s not so much a complaint as it is a compliment. I absolutely cannot wait for the next book to come out, even though I’m sure it’s going to be a while.
Date published: 2011-11-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Peculiar New YA Book “Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children” is a classic YA adventure that I hear is already being considered for a movie. And it would make a good movie. As a book, it wasn’t the best YA book I’ve read, nor was it the worst. The concept of “peculiar” people having to fight against evil and horrible things is not a new one. Jacob sets out to find an island and the group of children his grandfather has been talking about for years. What he finds is a time loop, children with unique and peculiar powers, and an adventure that will change his life forever. The writing in this book was strong and solid. With a good imagination and the ability to develop strong characters, Ransom Riggs has a future as a good YA writer. The ending of the book rather left things open for a sequel, but with so many other books on my TBR list, if there is a second book, I probably won’t be reading it.
Date published: 2011-09-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A real treat I thought this book was just fabulous, a wonderful mix of vintage photographs and exciting story. A labour of love for the author whose story grew from the collection of "peculiar" vintage photographs he was collecting and searching for, this book was a joy to experience and the photographs lend to the creepy atmosphere in which the story takes place. Our protagonist Jacob finds himself on a remote island searching for answers to what he always thought of as his grandfather's made up stories. When he stumbles upon the ruins of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children he discovers that perhaps his grandfather was telling the truth. And the story unfolds from there.The way in which the author mixes the stories with the photographs gives the story a grounding in historic relevance, so while there is an element of the fantastical it still feels relatable and real.
Date published: 2011-08-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Strange, Gothic and Peculiar Reason for Reading: I couldn't resist! This book has everything I love in one book: orphans, mysterious island, vintage photographs, creepy atmosphere and an old house. How could I not want to read it. Here is a book that once again uses photographs and text together in a unique way. The obscure, peculiar vintage photographs are simply illustrative, but the author has had to write his story around already existing photos which enhance the story to such a degree that the book would not be what it is without them. The notes do say that "with the exception of a few that have undergone minimal postprocessing, they are unaltered." Really only one word sums up this book and that is the eponymous "peculiar" for peculiar it certainly is. This is not a fast paced book, not one that will have you racing to the end for the grand finale which may put some of the intended audience off. However, it is more meandering, taking its time, showing us all the "peculiar" characters, who and what they are, as the story unfolds. Jacob comes to the island to get over the death of his grandfather who had told him fantastical tales of this place his whole life to prove that it is just an island after all, but he quickly learns his grandfather's tales were true. The story settles in and slowly reveals the secret of the island, the house, the children, Jacob's grandfather, and eventually Jacob's part in it all. A very moody atmospheric story that I quite enjoyed. I loved the characters and as a lover of vintage photos was totally fascinated with the photographs. My only concern with the book is a certain tone of vulgar language coming mostly from Jacob, the narrator. There is some swearing but it is the vulgar images that certain language convey which is of more concern. The only reason I can think of this use is to show that Jacob is from the here and now, as opposed to the 1940's of the other children, though some of those boys have vulgar turns of phrase as well. I wouldn't recommend the book for younger children. Also, the book ends with the characters all set to take on a new adventure which is obviously a set-up for a second book, which is rather disappointing as I am getting tired of sequels and series these days. Whatever happened to the good ole standalone? However, teens and adults should find a rather spooky read that will keep them entertained.
Date published: 2011-08-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Creepily Atmospheric Pros: character growth, creepily atmospheric, high quality physical book, creatively meshes backstory with mythology and history/ Cons: don't learn as much about the kids as you'd like, doesn't fully explain their abilities or why they're born as they are/ For Parents: some swearing, some violence (mostly offscreen), kissing/ If ever there were an argument against ebooks, it would be Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. Yes, you can read it on an ereader, and yes, the story would still be creepy and fun, but you'd miss something about the experience. This is a beautiful hardcover, with thick pages and gorgeous black and white photographs scattered throughout. Holding it and turning the pages is part of the ambiance the story creates./ Jakob Portman grew up hearing his grandfather's fantastic stories about the children's home he was sent to in England as a Jewish Polish immigrant in World War II. The stories were about children who could do peculiar things, like levitate, hold fire and lift very heavy things. But the violent death of his grandfather, along with the old man's last words, make him wonder if there was some truth to his stories./ This is a slow paced coming of age story. Mr. Riggs takes time to develop Jakob as a character, especially regarding his mental state, as well as the settings, in the book./ At first glance, the children seem like X-Men rip offs. They're said to be the next step in evolution and have different, extraordinary abilities. But while some of the abilities are useful, others - like having 2 mouths or bees living inside your body - are not at first glance advantageous. And while one group of peculiars thinks it would be grand to use their abilities to subjugate normals, the rest simply want to live in peace. / I loved how the author amalgamated their existence with history as witches, changelings and circus performers. It gave the book a sense of history, and the kids a practical reason to hide./ The downside of the novel is that you don't learn as much as you'd like about certain things: the kids (their histories and abilities), how the loops work and why people are born peculiar. I'd love to see Riggs bring out a book of the grandfather's stories or a photo album of Miss Peregrine's home, with the stories of how each child came to be there./ There seems to be a move in SF towards the reimagining of history with a horror slant. While Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children is mostly set in the present, it reminded me of Eutopia by David Nickle and Mr. Shivers by Robert Jackson Bennett./ This is an open ended novel with series potential. It's a slow, atmospheric work that adults and teens will love.
Date published: 2011-07-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A peculiar and extraordinary fantasy you must read! “With its X-Men: First Class-meets-time-travel story line, David Lynchian imagery, and rich, eerie detail, it’s no wonder Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children has been snapped up by Twentieth Century Fox. B+”—Entertainment Weekly The story grabs you like Keys to the Kingdom, Wrinkle in Time or Harry Potter; the photographs burn into your retina never to leave. This is an extraordinary reading experience you can only jump into from the print edition. Can't find a copy? It's hard to get BUT thankfully the publisher has reprinted and books should be on shelves next week ... fingers crossed and feet off the ground.
Date published: 2011-07-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A wonderfully exciting read for teens and adults alike! A copy was provided by the publisher prior to the release date for review purposes. "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children". Just the name is enough to peak your attention, isn't it? And to add to that, upon the cover features a fragile little girl wearing a crown on her head and...wait what's that? Her feet aren't touching the ground?! Peculiar indeed! There is no doubt in my mind that Mr. Riggs has me under his spell. If the title and it's mysterious cover weren't enough to do me in then the synopsis surely did the trick. The novel starts off with Jacob. He begins readers off with the re-telling of one of his most treasured memories- one with his grandfather. You see, Jacob's grandfather loves to tell stories, ones that he swear to be completely true. As Jacob recounts his memory, he recalls his grandfather's telling of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. Children that resided there included a girl so light she needed to be tied to a string to keep from floating away, twins who could communicate with each other without speaking a word, a boy so strong he could lift a large bolder over his head and a boy who had bees living inside him. Just the pure magic of that very precious memory Jacob shares was enough to suck me into Rigg's wonderful imaginary universe. I found myself having the need to know more and the pages kept turning. As the re-telling ends we are transported to the present, in which Jacob is 15 years old. Jacob is known to have been working part time at the pharmaceutical company owned by his various uncles. However, the unexpected happens when he receives a panicked phone call from his grandfather, begging him for the location of the key to his gun cabinet. Jacob, fearing for his grandfather's safety, feigns ignorance to it's location and assumes that the fit was caused by his excessively quick aging. As a favor to his father, Jacob travels to his grandfather's house to check on him but what he discovers is both terrible and heartbreaking. He comes upon his grandfather's body, bloodied and cut by what appear to be giant claws. A gasp from his grandfather's lips clues him in that he is still alive. What he whispers to Jacob, however, is what begins the wonderful adventure in Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children; "Go to the island. You'll be safe there. Promise me." I found Riggs' novel to be extremely well written and easy to read; both enjoyable to teens and adults alike. The pace of the novel was quite even, not too quick and not unbearably slow; the perfect pace for readers who love stories entrapped in mystery. Main character Jacob is a very likable and realistic character. Jacob could very well be the boy you went to high school with or the one who lived just down the street. Other characters including Emma, Enoch, Claire and Miss Peregrine were surprisingly very well developed. You could feel their presence; their likenesses popping up from the pages as you read of their personalities and interactions. The development of the story was quite exciting, each page I turned holding an unpredictable event waiting to jump at me. In honesty, the novel was spectacular! An excellent mixture of mystery, adventure, comedy and romance. On the subject of the photographs; wow! I don't think wow covers it but wow! Riggs did an amazing job creating this beautiful wonderland bound in pages using the images that he portrayed in the novel. As you read you will find them placed in just the right points of the story to give you a larger visual of either what is occurring or the identify of the character being introduced. These vintage photos added excellent dimension to the novel, one that I believe heavily competes with other novels of it's genre. Needless to say, if my review hasn't pointed it out already then I should make point of how highly recommended this novel is from yours truly. You will no doubt find yourself entranced and engrossed in this wonderful adventure. Bonus news: Upon searching through the web for a few photo samplers from Miss Peregrine, I discovered that the novel has indeed been optioned for a movie by Fox. Excellent news for readers who loved this novel!
Date published: 2011-06-15

– More About This Product –

Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children

by Ransom Riggs

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 484 pages, 8.5 × 5.7 × 1.1 in

Published: August 22, 2012

Publisher: Thorndike Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1410450236

ISBN - 13: 9781410450234

From the Publisher

A New York Times Bestseller -- In an unforgettable novel that mixes spine-tingling fiction with haunting photography, a horrific tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob on a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine''s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned rooms, it becomes clear that Miss Peregrine''s children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. And somehow -- they may still be alive.

About the Author

Ransom Riggs is a writer and filmmaker. He attended the Pine View School for the Gifted in Florida. He studied English literature at Kenyon College and studied film at the University of Southern California. His work on short films for the Internet and blogging for Mental Floss magazine got him a job writing The Sherlock Holmes Handbook which was released as a tie-in to the 2009 Sherlock Holmes film. Riggs had collected curious vernacular photographs and approached his publisher, Quirk Books, about using some of them in a picture book. On the suggestion of an editor, Riggs used the photographs as a guide from which to put together a narrative.The resulting book was Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children which made The New York Times Best Seller list. One of his other books inspired by old photographs entitled Taking Pictures was published in 2012. The sequel Hollow City: The Second Novel of Miss, Peregrime's Children also made The New York Times Best Seller List.
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