Next

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Next

by MICHAEL CRICHTON

May 20, 2008 | Hardcover

Next is rated 3.1364 out of 5 by 22.

Is a loved one missing some body parts? Are blondes becoming extinct? Is everyone at your dinner table of the same species? Humans and chimpanzees differ in only 400 genes; is that why a chimp fetus resembles a human being? And should that worry us? There's a new genetic cure for drug addiction?is it worse than the disease?

We live in a time of momentous scientific leaps, a time when it's possible to sell our eggs and sperm online for thousands of dollars and to test our spouses for genetic maladies.

We live in a time when one fifth of all our genes are owned by someone else, and an unsuspecting person and his family can be pursued cross-country because they happen to have certain valuable genes within their chromosomes . . .

Devilishly clever, Next blends fact and fiction into a breathless tale of a new world where nothing is what it seems and a set of new possibilities can open at every turn.

Next challenges our sense of reality and notions of morality. Balancing the comic and the bizarre with the genuinely frightening and disturbing, Next shatters our assumptions and reveals shocking new choices where we least expect.

The future is closer than you think.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 464 pages, 9.28 × 6.44 × 1.34 in

Published: May 20, 2008

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0060872985

ISBN - 13: 9780060872984

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Too bad this was his last I thought I would read this book given that it is ultimately his last. ( Crichton died last month ). This book surprised me because I assumed it to be much better than it was. The return to genetic manipulation (read Jurassic Park) had me convinced this book would blow my mind. The "stars" of this novel are a talking parrot, and a Human-panzee boy. None of the story threads connected until the end, and that was pure coincidence. This wasn't worth its original price, and barely worth what I paid for it at a flea market.
Date published: 2008-12-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read this NEXT! Never disappointed by a Michael Crichton book, I bought this one straight away and didn't stop reading until it was over. I love his storytelling techniques and all the different stories that coincide with one another. Even though there is usually a lot going on at once, I never get mislead or confused. The only drawback to this book is that I felt slightly disappointed by the ending. Whether or not I just wasn't ready for it to be over or if I thought it should be different. Either way, I still loved loved loved this book!
Date published: 2008-10-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Not his best. I have read many MC novels, and I have to say that this one, although good, was not in my top 5. I appreciate the topic, the science and research, but I found the storylines and multiple characters confused me at times. If you plan to read it straight through, then this won't be an issue. Just be forewarned if you put it down and pick it up again, you might struggle to remember who's who.
Date published: 2008-07-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting, disconcerting yet occasionally amusing This was my first Crichton book. To begin with, I wasn't sure of the way the storyline unfolded. There are a number of characters to get to grips with in a short time, as other reviewers have noted. Once you get into it, it's a great book which blurs the line between fact and fiction in the area of genetics - from political, social and moral standpoints. Some of the events are at least based on real-life - and they're even more scary for being so. The other reviews on this page seem to show that you'll either love this book or hate it. I think an interest in science and genetics helps, as I really enjoyed it and have since bought 'State of Fear', also by Crichton.
Date published: 2008-06-23
Rated 3 out of 5 by from PRETTY GOOD READ NOT ONE OF HIS BEST BUT NOT THE WORST EITHER.
Date published: 2008-06-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Luminous Next’ throws you into the fast paced world of genetics. It touches upon the mega implications of genetic research and shows the dire, apocalyptic qualities associated with gene tampering. It makes you wonder if those pea plants shouldn’t have been tampered with after all. The short chapters help accelerate the book vigorously down the Mendelavian highway. The book concludes as the characters come together in zygotene symmetry and Michael Crichtons story telling mastery is fully reviled.
Date published: 2008-06-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Ovaltine? I was like the excited kid in The Christmas Story; instead of using my decoder pen to unravel some great mystery, I was entranced by Michael Crichton's new work, turning page after page, only to be very disappointed with the end result.
Date published: 2008-03-18
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Very Disapointing! Very slow, too many loose ends, or characters whose story was pointless. I was expecting great things, and I loved his other novels, but this one just plain sucked. An absolute waste of my time.
Date published: 2008-03-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fruitful Blend for the Mind This book provides a great look into the world of bioengineering and the affects such experiments can have on the various aspects of the human, animal and medical worlds. This book contains a great blend of suspense, thrill, action and intrigue that keeps the mind wanting and coming back for more
Date published: 2008-01-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Excellent !! This book is a must read if you are into biotechnology and wonder how it could potentially affect our world !! Have fun !!!
Date published: 2008-01-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Next is impossible to keep down! One of Crichton's best novels. This book takes the reader into the complex world of genetic research within an entertaining narrative. Every page made you want you want to see what happened next. I wonder if there is a gene that genetically promotes reading. Beautiful how Crichton intermingles hardcore research with fluid prose. Strongly recommended as it will open your eyes to a brave but scary new world.
Date published: 2007-12-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Keep you on the edge of your seat. This book keeps you on the edge of your seat. I need to know what was going to happen next. I read this book in less then 2 days. It was an excellent read.
Date published: 2007-12-18
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Very Disappointing I usually pick up every book by Michael Crichton, and I have always enjoyed them. This book has the same style from his other works which makes it very easy to read. But it does not have a single plot that develops throughout the book. Instead there are multiple story lines that end up being related in the end, which is just far too coincidental (read: forced). By comparison, this is the most disappointing work I have read of his. I certainly will not read it again and I hope that he returns to his previous style in future books.
Date published: 2007-02-21
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Next... of kin? This book is beyond resuscitation Bad. Very bad. I only finished it because I kept hoping it would get better. It did not. Maybe Crichton needs to take a hiatus and go back to his day job for awhile... I agree with one of the previous reviews - the talking bird really was the most entertaining character in the book. Sad. Very sad.
Date published: 2007-01-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Intriguing I have never read a book by Michael Crichton before so I don't have anything to compare this book to, but I thought "Next" was done fairly well. I did find there were too many different characters and small plots to keep up with at times, but I loved how they all somewhat connected in the end. The entire story involving genetics and testing was very intriguing and gives the reader plenty to think about.
Date published: 2007-01-21
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Sadly lacking I love Michael Crighton's writing and most of his previous works. This book however is my least favorite of a trio of books that have lately been a real disappointment. State of Fear, Prey and now Next are well researched and of course interesting but with Next in particular, I felt like I was reading a series of individual stories unrelated to one another instead of a cohesive single plot. Too many characters and subplots not enough of any single story.
Date published: 2007-01-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fabulous!!!! I thought this book was very exciting, and funny. I love how the characters stories come together in the end! I love the topic and I think it really gives you something to think about! Anyone who really loves Michael Crichton will love this book!!!!
Date published: 2007-01-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Depends on what kind of Chrichton you like His earlier works are fun. HIs latest novels are more social commentary than fiction. "Prey" covered Nanotechnology, "State of Fear" global warning, and now with "Next," Chrichton delves into the contraversial area of genetics. Gene patents, genetic engineering, human rights and other related topics are crammed into this novel. There are a lot of ideas in here and his point is to educate more than entertain. I found both "State of Fear" and "Next" to be very interesting, well-researched and I supsect that students of the future will be assigned to read and discuss these novels rather than his earlier writings. If you enjoy thought provoking "fiction" then you should like this book very much. If you want pure entertainment, best to stick to lighter fare such as Dan Brown et al. It's a shame that a poorly researched and weak attempt at mixing fact and fiction like "The Da Vinci Code" got so much attention and that a much better book, "Next" is not receiving any. All of the issues raised in "Next" will become more and more important in years to come and some of the current trends are very scary. I can't wait for Chricton's next work and hope it's more of the fact/fiction blend.
Date published: 2007-01-05
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not his best Crichton delivers a so so book. There were too many characters in the 415 pages. By doing so we do not really connect with any of the characters. I agree wth the reviewer from London this novel looks to be a rush job. I am a Crichton fan but his last three novels.....Prey, State of Fear and Next are far inferior to his novels like Jurassic Park, Congo, and Rising Sun. I hope his next book is better or I am going to stop purchasing his novels.
Date published: 2006-12-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Entertaining story with a social message. Michael Crichton is one of the best techno-thriller writers. His books are always well researched and VERY believeable. This book kept me so engrossed in it that I missed my bus stop on my way home one night! This particular book is about genetics and about the social responsibility we all have regarding this new, emerging technology. His story serves as a cautionary tale for all of us to make sure that we understand the reprocusions of our current law. I would suggest this to anyone, regardless of their favourite genre as this book is so far reaching, it will entertain anyone!
Date published: 2006-12-20
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Crap. Total Crap. If you're looking for a book with no plot whatsoever, look no further. This book reads like a collection of ideas rather then a novel. I assume Mr. Crichton had a deadline he had to meet and wasn't quite ready. It's a lot of "is genetic engineering/testing going too far and what does the future hold?" There's no real story, some outrageous ideas, no character development, and no climax. The conclusion could have spewed from the most half witted of hollywood hacks. Stay far, far away from this book. Michael Crichton has clearly lost his edge entirely.
Date published: 2006-12-16
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Interesting and scary read What comes NEXT?.. the consequences of biomedical research, genetic research and transgenic experiments are the basis for this fiction thriller that brings several scenerios into play. What if the sperm that you donated anonymously 25 years ago in college to finance that weekend kegger lands on your doorstep and blames you for her drug addiction and has the genetic profile to prove it? What if genetic profiling required by health insurance companies show that you have a hereditary predisposition to heart disease and you can't get health insurance? What if that nasty divorce lawyer requests your genetic profile, provided by a bitter spouse with hairs from your hairbrush, to prove that you are an unfit parent? And drug companies own the rights to your tissue, sold to them by the University Medical Centre that treated you for cancer, and they can take tissue samples now from your cancer-free body ...any time they want? All of these very real legal and ethical issues are fictionalized here. Throw in lots of cheating. lots of shady lawyers, a talking primate, a nasty Amazon Grey and a transgenic chimp. Pretty interesting stuff!!!
Date published: 2006-12-03

– More About This Product –

Next

by MICHAEL CRICHTON

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 464 pages, 9.28 × 6.44 × 1.34 in

Published: May 20, 2008

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0060872985

ISBN - 13: 9780060872984

From the Publisher

Is a loved one missing some body parts? Are blondes becoming extinct? Is everyone at your dinner table of the same species? Humans and chimpanzees differ in only 400 genes; is that why a chimp fetus resembles a human being? And should that worry us? There's a new genetic cure for drug addiction?is it worse than the disease?

We live in a time of momentous scientific leaps, a time when it's possible to sell our eggs and sperm online for thousands of dollars and to test our spouses for genetic maladies.

We live in a time when one fifth of all our genes are owned by someone else, and an unsuspecting person and his family can be pursued cross-country because they happen to have certain valuable genes within their chromosomes . . .

Devilishly clever, Next blends fact and fiction into a breathless tale of a new world where nothing is what it seems and a set of new possibilities can open at every turn.

Next challenges our sense of reality and notions of morality. Balancing the comic and the bizarre with the genuinely frightening and disturbing, Next shatters our assumptions and reveals shocking new choices where we least expect.

The future is closer than you think.

About the Author

Michael Crichton?s novels include Pirate Latitudes, Next, State of Fear, Prey, Timeline, Jurassic Park, and The Andromeda Strain. He is also known as a filmmaker and the creator of ER. One of the most popular writers in the world, he has sold over 200 million books, which have been translated into thirty-six languages; thirteen have been made into films. He remains the only writer to have had the number one book, movie, and TV show at the same time.

From the Author

A Q&A with Michael Crichton Author of NEXT Q: As with many of your other novels, NEXT is a vivid dramatization of what can happen when cutting-edge science goes a little too far. Is NEXT a cautionary tale? MC: Well, I think it is, in the sense that many of my books are. But for me what's different about this book is that so much of it is real – or that so much of it is very thinly-disguised versions of actual events that have occurred. Genetics, which is the subject of the book, has advanced extraordinarily rapidly in the last 15 years or so and has sometimes gone in directions that many people are troubled about, or disapprove of. It is a very interesting and hot contentious area. Q: What scares you the most about NEXT? And conversely, which possibilities do you find the most encouraging? MC: I'm not really scared about anything in the genetic realm. My research actually reassured me, because I concluded that many of the things people discuss with great fear or great longing – such as designer babies, or extended longevity – are probably not going to happen. I think that we'll have some remarkable new therapies from this area, and we will also find that the genome is vastly more complicated than we anticipated. In that sense, the genome is a bit like the human brain-much harder to understand than we once imagined. Q: What first sparked your interest in genetics? MC: It's a longstanding interest of mine. I studied genetics and evolution in college, and of co
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Editorial Reviews

"[Crichton] invites a mass audience irresistibly into some of the Most Important Conversations We’re Not Having." (Time magazine)
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