Notes Of A Native Son

by James Baldwin
Illustrator Edward P. Jones

Beacon Press | April 26, 1999 | Trade Paperback

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A new edition published on the twenty-fifth anniversary of Baldwin’s death, including a new introduction by an important contemporary writer
 
Since its original publication in 1955, this first nonfiction collection of essays by James Baldwin remains an American classic. His impassioned essays on life in Harlem, the protest novel, movies, and African Americans abroad are as powerful today as when they were first written.
 
“A straight-from-the-shoulder writer, writing about the troubled problems of this troubled earth with an illuminating intensity.” —Langston Hughes, The New York Times Book Review
 
“Written with bitter clarity and uncommon grace.” —Time

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 192 pages, 7.98 × 5.32 × 0.59 in

Published: April 26, 1999

Publisher: Beacon Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0807064319

ISBN - 13: 9780807064313

Found in: American, Black

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– More About This Product –

Notes Of A Native Son

by James Baldwin
Illustrator Edward P. Jones

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 192 pages, 7.98 × 5.32 × 0.59 in

Published: April 26, 1999

Publisher: Beacon Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0807064319

ISBN - 13: 9780807064313

About the Book

Originally published in 1955, James Baldwin's first nonfiction book has become a classic. These searing essays on life in Harlem, the protest novel, movies, and Americans abroad remain as powerful today as when they were written. <BR><BR>"He named for me the things you feel but couldn't utter. . . . Jimmy's essays articulated for the first time to white America what it meant to be American and a black American at the same time." <BR>-Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Read from the Book

From the Introduction   I did not know James Baldwin the essayist before my first year of college. I knew only the James Baldwin of novels and short stories and plays, a trusted man who gave me, with his Harlem and his Harlem people, the kind of world I knew so well from growing up in my Washington, D.C. They were all one family, the people in Harlem and the people in Washington, Baldwin told me in that way of all grand and eloquent writers who speak the eternal and universal by telling us, word by hard-won word, of the minutiae of the everyday: The church ladies who put heart and soul into every church service as if to let their god know how worthy they are to step through the door into his heaven. The dust of poor folks’ apartments that forever hangs in the air as though to remind the people of their station in life. The streets of a city where the buildings Negroes live in never stand straight up but lean in mourning every which way. So I knew this Baldwin and, in that strange way of members of the same family, he knew me. When I went off to college in late August 1968, I took few books, anticipating the adequacy of the library that awaited me at Holy Cross College. I packed only two books of nonfiction, both bought in a used bookstore not long after I was accepted to college. Both had never been read. The first was a ponderous 1950s to me on writing logical and well-reasoned essays. I was never to read it in my time at Holy Cross, perhaps because it was so
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From the Publisher

A new edition published on the twenty-fifth anniversary of Baldwin&rsquo;s death, including a new introduction by an important contemporary writer
&#160;
Since its original publication in 1955, this first nonfiction collection of essays by James Baldwin remains an American classic. His impassioned essays on life in Harlem, the protest novel, movies, and African Americans abroad are as powerful today as when they were first written.
&#160;
&ldquo;A straight-from-the-shoulder writer, writing about the troubled problems of this troubled earth with an illuminating intensity.&rdquo; &mdash;Langston Hughes, The New York Times Book Review
&#160;
&ldquo;Written with bitter clarity and uncommon grace.&rdquo; &mdash;Time

About the Author

James Baldwin (1924&ndash;1987) was a novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic, and one of America''s foremost writers. His essays, such as &ldquo;Notes of a Native Son&rdquo; (1955), explore palpable yet unspoken intricacies of racial, sexual, and class distinctions in Western societies, most notably in mid-twentieth-century America. A Harlem, New York, native, he primarily made his home in the south of France.
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His novels include Giovanni&rsquo;s Room (1956), about a white American expatriate who must come to terms with his homosexuality, and Another Country (1962), about racial and gay sexual tensions among New York intellectuals. His inclusion of gay themes resulted in much savage criticism from the black community. Going to Meet the Man (1965) and Tell Me How Long the Train&rsquo;s Been Gone (1968) provided powerful descriptions of American racism. As an openly gay man, he became increasingly outspoken in condemning discrimination against lesbian and gay people.

From Our Editors

A literary classic, this volume contains essays on the author’s life in Harlem, movies and African-Americans abroad and still holds valuable lessons for today’s generation. James Baldwin is famous for his straightforward, unapologetic writing style. His first non-fiction book, Notes of a Native Son is a testament to the ideas of a man who saw the problems of the world with great clarity.

Editorial Reviews

"He named for me the things you feel but couldn''t utter. . . . Jimmy''s essays articulated for the first time to white America what it meant to be American and a black American at the same time."&mdash;Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

"A straight-from-the-shoulder writer, writing about the troubled problems of this troubled earth with an illuminating intensity."&mdash;Langston Hughes, The New York Times Book Review

&ldquo;Written with bitter clarity and uncommon grace.&rdquo; &mdash;Time
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