Other People's Children

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Other People's Children

by Joanna Trollope

Random House Of Canada | June 16, 2009 | Trade Paperback

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It's hard enough when your parents split upbut what happens when other people's children enter the picture?

When a man and a woman get married, things can get complicated - and even more so when a man and a woman who are divorced get remarried. And when there are children from previous marriages, 'complicated' can become the understatement of the century. Other People's Children concerns that expanding social unit: the stepfamily. It explores the myths, the truths, the ridiculousness, the tenderness and the difficulties of trying to simultaneously deal with present relationships, past relationships and, above all, other people's children.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 384 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.79 in

Published: June 16, 2009

Publisher: Random House Of Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0307357678

ISBN - 13: 9780307357670

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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– More About This Product –

Other People's Children

Other People's Children

by Joanna Trollope

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 384 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.79 in

Published: June 16, 2009

Publisher: Random House Of Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0307357678

ISBN - 13: 9780307357670

Read from the Book

Chapter One Behind him, someone said, ‘They shouldn’t be called weddings.’ Rufus felt his ears glow. He leaned forward and stared at the tips of the new shoes his mother had persuaded him to wear instead of trainers. The person who had spoken behind him had been a woman. She sounded vaguely familiar. ‘Not second time round,’ she said. Her voice was calm, as if she had no personal axe to grind, but was simply stating a fact. ‘There should be another word for second time round.’ Rufus raised his head very slowly and transferred his stare from his shoes to the wall twenty feet ahead of him. The wall was covered with white satiny paper, flowered and ribboned in more white, and on it hung a picture of the Queen in a white dress and a tiara and a broad blue ribbon running across her bosom with a brooch thing on it. Just below the Queen was the neat brown head of the lady in the grey suit and gold stud earrings who was, Rufus’s mother said, the registrar. Being a registrar meant you could marry people to each other. This registrar — who had smiled at Rufus and said, ‘Hello, dear’ — was going to marry Rufus’s mother in a minute. To Matthew. Rufus did not let his stare slide sideways from the registrar to include his mother and Matthew. Matthew had a grey suit on, too, and a yellow flower in his buttonhole and he was half a head taller than Rufus’s mother. He was, also and above all things, not Rufus&#
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From the Publisher

It's hard enough when your parents split upbut what happens when other people's children enter the picture?

When a man and a woman get married, things can get complicated - and even more so when a man and a woman who are divorced get remarried. And when there are children from previous marriages, 'complicated' can become the understatement of the century. Other People's Children concerns that expanding social unit: the stepfamily. It explores the myths, the truths, the ridiculousness, the tenderness and the difficulties of trying to simultaneously deal with present relationships, past relationships and, above all, other people's children.

From the Jacket

"Bravely and openly takes apart the myths of the family and the stepfamily."
- The Globe and Mail

"A gripping read - as shrewdly observant of psychological and domestic detail as anything she has written."
- Daily Telegraph

"Trollope has shown herself capable of such emotional depth, that although you turn the pages quickly, it is with trembling fingers."
- The Times

About the Author

Joanna Trollope is the author of a number of historical and contemporary novels including The Choir, A Village Affair, A Passionate Man, The Rector's Wife, The Men and the Girls and A Spanish Lover.

Editorial Reviews

"Bravely and openly takes apart the myths of the family and the stepfamily."
- The Globe and Mail

"A gripping read - as shrewdly observant of psychological and domestic detail as anything she has written."
- Daily Telegraph

"Trollope has shown herself capable of such emotional depth, that although you turn the pages quickly, it is with trembling fingers."
- The Times

Bookclub Guide

1. The stepmother myth is a powerful one in Western literature and culture. How far do you think our fear of stepmothers stems from our need to see our true mothers in a perfect light?

2. In Other People''s Children Dale, who is grown-up, and whose own mother died some time ago, is more hostile towards the idea of stepmothers than, perhaps, any of the other characters. Why should this be?

3. Joanna Trollope avoids the obvious happy ending in this novel. Do you think that things could have worked out for Tom and Elizabeth?

4. The author has said that you cannot have change in life without sacrifice: ''All my novels focus on what making a choice really means, because I think that sacrifice through choice is something that happens to almost everybody.'' How far do you think that the choices which the characters in Other People''s Children make are for altruistic reasons?

5. Ann Widdecombe, in reviewing this novel, said ''One pities the Rufuses of this world who pay the price for the lack of adult self-restraint and willingness to see things through...Other People''s Children should be required reading in every sixth form. It might give pause for thought in later life and is more eloquent than a thousand sermons.'' Does this novel support the idea that unhappy couples should stay together for the sake of the children?

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