Philomena: The true story of a mother and the son she had to give away (film tie-in edition)

by Martin Sixsmith

Pan Macmillan | October 17, 2013 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

Philomena: The true story of a mother and the son she had to give away (film tie-in edition) is rated 3 out of 5 by 4.
When she fell pregnant as a teenager in Ireland in 1952, Philomena Lee was sent to the convent at Roscrea in Co. Tipperary to be looked after as a fallen woman. She cared for her baby for three years until the Church took him from her and sold him, like countless others, to America for adoption. Coerced into signing a document promising never to attempt to see her child again, she nonetheless spent the next fifty years secretly searching for him, unaware that he was searching for her from across the Atlantic. Philomena's son, renamed Michael Hess, grew up to be a top Washington lawyer and a leading Republican official in the Reagan and Bush administrations. But he was a gay man in a homophobic party where he had to conceal not only his sexuality but, eventually, the fact that he had AIDs. With little time left, he returned to Ireland and the convent where he was born: his desperate quest to find his mother before he died left a legacy that was to unfold with unexpected consequences for all involved. The Lost Child of Philomena Lee is the tale of a mother and a son whose lives were scarred by the forces of hypocrisy on both sides of the Atlantic and of the secrets they were forced to keep. A compelling narrative of human love and loss, Martin Sixsmith's moving account is both heartbreaking yet ultimately redemptive.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 17, 2013

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1447245334

ISBN - 13: 9781447245339

Found in: Biography and Memoir

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Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from False advertising in publishing. Attention: Spoiler Alert. I completely agree with the review by Cathy Nolan: this book is not what it says it is. I did not see the movie but I read the back liner of the book and thought I was buying a book about researching for a lost son, a sort of investigation or mystery. What a disappointment. The first section about Philomena together with her son is very interesting though. If you're interested in the day to day life of a homosexual with all the anxiety plus the stress of being in the closet this is a good book for you. Pages 188 throgh 433 is only about the son. If you're looking for " Philomena and her search for the son she never stopped loving." forget it. I only finished it because I wanted to see how this long, boring 452 page novel ended. I don't know if the publisher wrote the back liner or the authour but this is an outright rip-off.
Date published: 2014-08-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A heartbreaking reality Interested in reading the novel before seeing the movie adaptation, I bought Philomena with high hopes. In short, it did not disappoint. Readers get a in-depth look into the life of Michael A. Hess as he travels through life as a displaced orphan. Learning more about the politics at the time and the treatment of those living with AIDS in a rather conservative America broke my heart. Knowing that the story rings with truth throughout the novel's entirety, made the novel all the more real. I highly recommend the novel to anyone looking for a great read.
Date published: 2014-04-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from The story is not what the title promises. Compellingly disappointing. This was branded as "The Poignant true story of a mother and the son she gave away". This is not the story the book delivers. It is the story of the son rather than the mother. The first pages detail the plight of Philomena, the birth of Anthony, the abhorrent influence the Catholic Church's stance had on unmarried pregnant mothers, their illegitimate children and ultimately, the unlawful removal of her son by those dedicated to a life of chastity, poverty and obedience. But this book does NOT recount the story of Philomena, it is almost entirely the story of her son's journey through his life as a lost immigrant, an orphan struggling to come to terms with his perception of abandonment by his birth mother and his struggle for acceptance in every aspect of his adult life. The book documents Michael's (Anthony's) conscious desire to fit in with his new family at the enormous expense of his emotional well-being. It chronicles his early education, his naive but questioning experience of teenage love and eventually although somewhat laboriously, his journey through the corridors of his early political career. The reader is given access to Micheal's convoluted thinking patterns including an explanation of his complex, negative and repetitive self-destructive behaviour. The part Philomena plays in the book is confined to the first 93 pages and the last four. To give an example of what the reader is not getting, the book has 452 pages, so I don't need to do the math for you. In the spirit of full disclosure, I'm Irish, born two years later than Anthony and I was raised Catholic in Northern Ireland. There are parts of this book that resonate with me: some of my school friends disappeared overnight and were never heard from again, a conclusion was often jumped to that the family had left because of "The Troubles" But as I read this with the knowledge and maturity of my 56 years, I am left with more questions than answers about the role the Church played in those years. The book is extremely well-written however, getting back to my main point, it is not the story of Philomena. But then, who would read a book or make a movie about an Irish immigrant, his struggle with established biases, his glorious political career and his attempt to reach his birth mother? Maybe me, if that's how it had been branded.
Date published: 2014-04-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from This was a tear jerker. I am so glad I bought this book.It proved to be a great read and well worth the price.
Date published: 2014-02-10

– More About This Product –

Philomena: The true story of a mother and the son she had to give away (film tie-in edition)

by Martin Sixsmith

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 17, 2013

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1447245334

ISBN - 13: 9781447245339

From the Publisher

When she fell pregnant as a teenager in Ireland in 1952, Philomena Lee was sent to the convent at Roscrea in Co. Tipperary to be looked after as a fallen woman. She cared for her baby for three years until the Church took him from her and sold him, like countless others, to America for adoption. Coerced into signing a document promising never to attempt to see her child again, she nonetheless spent the next fifty years secretly searching for him, unaware that he was searching for her from across the Atlantic. Philomena's son, renamed Michael Hess, grew up to be a top Washington lawyer and a leading Republican official in the Reagan and Bush administrations. But he was a gay man in a homophobic party where he had to conceal not only his sexuality but, eventually, the fact that he had AIDs. With little time left, he returned to Ireland and the convent where he was born: his desperate quest to find his mother before he died left a legacy that was to unfold with unexpected consequences for all involved. The Lost Child of Philomena Lee is the tale of a mother and a son whose lives were scarred by the forces of hypocrisy on both sides of the Atlantic and of the secrets they were forced to keep. A compelling narrative of human love and loss, Martin Sixsmith's moving account is both heartbreaking yet ultimately redemptive.
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