Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790ñ1830

by Canuel, Mark

Cambridge University Press | October 1, 1998 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

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In Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790-1830, Mark Canuel examines the way that Romantic poets, novelists and political writers criticised the traditional grounding of British political unity in religious conformity. Canuel shows how a wide range of writers including Jeremy Bentham, Ann Radcliffe, Maria Edgeworth and Lord Byron not only undermined the validity of religion in the British state, but also imagined a new, tolerant, and more organised mode of social inclusion. To argue against the authority of religion, Canuel claims, was to argue for a thoroughly revised form of tolerant yet highly organised government, in other words, a mode of political authority that provided unprecedented levels of inclusion and protection. Canuel argues that these writers saw their works as political and literary commentaries on the extent and limits of religious toleration. His study throws new light on political history as well as the literature of the romantic period.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 1, 1998

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0511030487

ISBN - 13: 9780511030482

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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– More About This Product –

Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790ñ1830

by Canuel, Mark

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 1, 1998

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0511030487

ISBN - 13: 9780511030482

From the Publisher

In Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790-1830, Mark Canuel examines the way that Romantic poets, novelists and political writers criticised the traditional grounding of British political unity in religious conformity. Canuel shows how a wide range of writers including Jeremy Bentham, Ann Radcliffe, Maria Edgeworth and Lord Byron not only undermined the validity of religion in the British state, but also imagined a new, tolerant, and more organised mode of social inclusion. To argue against the authority of religion, Canuel claims, was to argue for a thoroughly revised form of tolerant yet highly organised government, in other words, a mode of political authority that provided unprecedented levels of inclusion and protection. Canuel argues that these writers saw their works as political and literary commentaries on the extent and limits of religious toleration. His study throws new light on political history as well as the literature of the romantic period.
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