Representative English Dramas From Dryden To Sheridan

by Frederick Tupper

General Books LLC | May 8, 2012 | Trade Paperback

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 Excerpt: ...madam. In a submissive tone, retiring. Phil. Commands about parting are grown mighty easy to you of late. Tom. Oh, I have her; I have nettled and put her into the right temper to be wrought upon and set a-prating. Aside."--Why, truly, to be plain with you, Mrs. Phillis, I can take little comfort of late in frequenting your house. Phil. Pray, Mr. Thomas, what is it all of a sudden offends your nicety at our house? Tom. I don''t care to speak particulars, but I dislike the whole. Phil. I thank you, sir, I am a part of that whole. Tom. Mistake me not, good Phillis. rinl. Good Phillis! Saucy enough. But however Tom. I say, it is that thou art a part, which gives me pain for tbe disposition of the whole. You must know, madam, to be Exit, serious, I am a man, at the bottom, of prodigious nice honor. You are too much exposed to company at your house. To be plain, I don''t like so many, that would be your mistress''s lovers, whispering to you. Phil. Don''t think to put that upon me. You say this, because I wrung you to the your guilty conif you but heart when I touched science about Judy. Tom. Ah, Phillis! Phillis! knew my heart! Phil. I know too much on''t. Tom. Nay, then, poor Crispo''s fate and mine are one. Therefore give me leave to say, or sing at least, as he does upon the same occasion--"Se vedette," &c. Sings.'' Phil. What, do you think I''m to be fobbed off with a song? I don''t question but you have sung the same to Mrs. Judy too. Tom. Don''t disparage your charms, good Phillis, with jealousy of so worthless an object; besides, she is a poor hussy, and if you doubt the sincerity of my love, you will allow me true to my interest. You are a fortune, Phillis. /''/.''.'', What would the fop be at now? In good time, indeed, you shall be setting up for a...

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 310 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.65 in

Published: May 8, 2012

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1152802550

ISBN - 13: 9781152802551

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– More About This Product –

Representative English Dramas From Dryden To Sheridan

by Frederick Tupper

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 310 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.65 in

Published: May 8, 2012

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1152802550

ISBN - 13: 9781152802551

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 Excerpt: ...madam. In a submissive tone, retiring. Phil. Commands about parting are grown mighty easy to you of late. Tom. Oh, I have her; I have nettled and put her into the right temper to be wrought upon and set a-prating. Aside."--Why, truly, to be plain with you, Mrs. Phillis, I can take little comfort of late in frequenting your house. Phil. Pray, Mr. Thomas, what is it all of a sudden offends your nicety at our house? Tom. I don''t care to speak particulars, but I dislike the whole. Phil. I thank you, sir, I am a part of that whole. Tom. Mistake me not, good Phillis. rinl. Good Phillis! Saucy enough. But however Tom. I say, it is that thou art a part, which gives me pain for tbe disposition of the whole. You must know, madam, to be Exit, serious, I am a man, at the bottom, of prodigious nice honor. You are too much exposed to company at your house. To be plain, I don''t like so many, that would be your mistress''s lovers, whispering to you. Phil. Don''t think to put that upon me. You say this, because I wrung you to the your guilty conif you but heart when I touched science about Judy. Tom. Ah, Phillis! Phillis! knew my heart! Phil. I know too much on''t. Tom. Nay, then, poor Crispo''s fate and mine are one. Therefore give me leave to say, or sing at least, as he does upon the same occasion--"Se vedette," &c. Sings.'' Phil. What, do you think I''m to be fobbed off with a song? I don''t question but you have sung the same to Mrs. Judy too. Tom. Don''t disparage your charms, good Phillis, with jealousy of so worthless an object; besides, she is a poor hussy, and if you doubt the sincerity of my love, you will allow me true to my interest. You are a fortune, Phillis. /''/.''.'', What would the fop be at now? In good time, indeed, you shall be setting up for a...
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