Road Dogs: A Novel

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Road Dogs: A Novel

by Elmore Leonard

HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS | April 26, 2010 | Trade Paperback

Road Dogs: A Novel is rated 4 out of 5 by 2.

Jack Foley and Cundo Rey are road dogs: trusted jailhouse comrades watching each other''s back. They''re so tight, Cundo''s using his own money and his shark lady lawyer to get Foley''s sentence reduced from thirty years to three months. And when Jack gets out, the wealthy Cuban criminal wants him to stay in Cundo''s multimillion dollar Venice Beach house-right across from the one where Cundo''s common-law wife, professional psychic Dawn Navarro, resides. There will certainly be some payback expected, though Jack can''t figure out what. Sexy Dawn''s intentions are a lot clearer. But Cundo''s coming home earlier than anticipated, and Jack smells a double-cross cooking-the kind that could turn a road dog into road kill.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 288 pages, 8.13 × 5.25 × 0.71 in

Published: April 26, 2010

Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0061985708

ISBN - 13: 9780061985706

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Another Gem I admire the old pros. Elmore Leonard, now in his eighties, throws off an inconsequential tale with recycled characters and I loved it. Leonard, and his cohorts Don Westlake and Lawrence Block, honed their craft in the ‘50s by writing a lot. The result is the fabled Leonard dialogue and a style that looks quick and easy. But to every wannabe Leonard’s peril, imitating Leonard is like copying Hemingway - it takes a little more than just terseness. Leonard brings back Jack Foley, memorably played by George Clooney in Out of Sight; Cundo Rey, a Cuban go-go dancer and businessman from LaBrava; and Dawn Navarro, who showed up in Riding the Rap. Off-stage is Karen Sisco, also from Out of Sight. It all seems natural, there are so many memorable characters in the Leonard catalogue, we expect them to meet up. The pace is languid and the book is short so this is not an intricately plotted book. But no matter. Leonard uses the space to reflect on loyalty, trust, and betrayal in their many forms. Foley and Rey were road dogs in prison, they watched each others back. Rey has a pal, Little Jimmy, whom he saved in Cuba and trusts enough leave his assets in Little Jimmy’s name. Dawn Navarro is Rey’s wife, who pledged to be faithful while Rey did an eight-year stretch. Leonard sketches his scenes with his trademarked efficiency and his ruminations are quick and clean and interspersed with lively dialogue. Nothing pedantic or pretentious about the lessons here, but with Leonard, would you expect otherwise? The reader just skips along with this enjoyable tale. The skipping along is a tribute to Leonard’s skill - the theme is reinforced so subtly that I scarcely realized all the variations on the theme until I reflected after finishing the book. If you’re still wondering if Leonard is coasting, he’s not. He throws off little nuggets of information that show that he’s still paying attention. Stuff like brown-brown (a mixture of cocaine and gunpowder used in Africa) and salvia (a psychoactive herb originally used in by Mexican natives). I admire the old pros. Elmore Leonard, now in his eighties, throws off an inconsequential tale with recycled characters and I loved it. Leonard, and his cohorts Don Westlake and Lawrence Block, honed their craft in the ‘50s by writing a lot. The result is the fabled Leonard dialogue and a style that looks quick and easy. But to every wannabe Leonard’s peril, imitating Leonard is like copying Hemingway - it takes a little more than just terseness. Leonard brings back Jack Foley, memorably played by George Clooney in Out of Sight; Cundo Rey, a Cuban go-go dancer and businessman from LaBrava; and Dawn Navarro, who showed up in Riding the Rap. Off-stage is Karen Sisco, also from Out of Sight. It all seems natural, there are so many memorable characters in the Leonard catalogue, we expect them to meet up. The pace is languid and the book is short so this is not an intricately plotted book. But no matter. Leonard uses the space to reflect on loyalty, trust, and betrayal in their many forms. Foley and Rey were road dogs in prison, they watched each others back. Rey has a pal, Little Jimmy, whom he saved in Cuba and trusts enough leave his assets in Little Jimmy’s name. Dawn Navarro is Rey’s wife, who pledged to be faithful while Rey did an eight-year stretch. Leonard sketches his scenes with his trademarked efficiency and his ruminations are quick and clean and interspersed with lively dialogue. Nothing pedantic or pretentious about the lessons here, but with Leonard, would you expect otherwise? The reader just skips along with this enjoyable tale. The skipping along is a tribute to Leonard’s skill - the theme is reinforced so subtly that I scarcely realized all the variations on the theme until I reflected after finishing the book. If you’re still wondering if Leonard is coasting, he’s not. He throws off little nuggets of information that show that he’s still paying attention. Stuff like brown-brown (a mixture of cocaine and gunpowder used in Africa) and salvia (a psychoactive herb originally used in by Mexican natives).
Date published: 2009-07-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good But Not Great For the first-timer to Elmore Leonard, this probably isn't the best novel. "Road Dogs" continues the characters of Jack Foley, Cundo Rey, and Dawn Navarro in a stab-in-the-back love triangle story. The plot begins well and Leonard's trademark is the dialogue between the characters. However, as the novel develops, the story starts to get a little stale and the ending is somewhat of a letdown. Interestingly enough, the side story of FBI stalker Lou Adams is probably the highlight of the book. Definitely expected more from Leonard, but still better than most of the drivel that is out there these days. Still recommend "Road Dogs" even for the un-initiated Leonard newbie.
Date published: 2009-05-31

– More About This Product –

Road Dogs: A Novel

by Elmore Leonard

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 288 pages, 8.13 × 5.25 × 0.71 in

Published: April 26, 2010

Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0061985708

ISBN - 13: 9780061985706

About the Book

"Road Dogs" is Leonard at his best--with his trademark tight plotting and pitch-perfect dialogue--and readers are sure to love seeing Cundo Rey, Jack Foley, and Dawn Navarro back in action and working together . . . or are they?

From the Publisher

Jack Foley and Cundo Rey are road dogs: trusted jailhouse comrades watching each other''s back. They''re so tight, Cundo''s using his own money and his shark lady lawyer to get Foley''s sentence reduced from thirty years to three months. And when Jack gets out, the wealthy Cuban criminal wants him to stay in Cundo''s multimillion dollar Venice Beach house-right across from the one where Cundo''s common-law wife, professional psychic Dawn Navarro, resides. There will certainly be some payback expected, though Jack can''t figure out what. Sexy Dawn''s intentions are a lot clearer. But Cundo''s coming home earlier than anticipated, and Jack smells a double-cross cooking-the kind that could turn a road dog into road kill.

About the Author

Elmore Leonard has written more than forty books during his highly successful writing career, and many of his novels have been made into movies. Leonard is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from PEN USA and the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America. He lives in Bloomfield Village, Michigan.

Editorial Reviews

"Leonard is arguably up there with Hammett, Chandler, Ed McBain and James Ellroy as one of the most influential writers of American crime fiction of the 20th century.... Full of great characters.... It is all good fun and the reader is quickly caught up in Leonard''s world.... Another gem of mixed morals and great dialogue." (Canberra Times)
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