Schindler's List

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Schindler's List

by Thomas Keneally

Touchstone | December 1, 1993 | Trade Paperback

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The acclaimed bestselling classic of Holocaust literature, winner of the Booker Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Award for Fiction, and the inspiration for the classic film—“a masterful account of the growth of the human soul” (Los Angeles Times Book Review).

A stunning novel based on the true story of how German war profiteer and factory director Oskar Schindler came to save more Jews from the gas chambers than any other single person during World War II. In this milestone of Holocaust literature, Thomas Keneally, author of Daughter of Mars, uses the actual testimony of the Schindlerjuden—Schindler’s Jews—to brilliantly portray the courage and cunning of a good man in the midst of unspeakable evil.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 400 pages, 8.44 × 5.5 × 0.9 in

Published: December 1, 1993

Publisher: Touchstone

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0671880314

ISBN - 13: 9780671880316

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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– More About This Product –

Schindler's List

by Thomas Keneally

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 400 pages, 8.44 × 5.5 × 0.9 in

Published: December 1, 1993

Publisher: Touchstone

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0671880314

ISBN - 13: 9780671880316

Read from the Book

From Chapter One General Sigmund List''s 5 armored divisions, driving north from the Sudetenland, had taken the sweet south Polish jewel of Cracow from both flanks on September 6, 1939. And it was in their wake that Oskar Schindler entered the city which, for the next five years, would be his oyster. Though within the month he would show that he was disaffected from National Socialism, he could still see that Cracow, with its railroad junction and its as yet modest industries, would be a boomtown of the new regime. He wasn''t going to be a salesman anymore. Now he was going to be a tycoon. It is not immediately easy to find in Oskar''s family''s history the origins of his impulse toward rescue. He was born on April 28, 1908, into the Austrian Empire of Franz Josef, into the hilly Moravian province of that ancient Austrian realm. His hometown was the industrial city of Zwittau, to which some commercial opening had brought the Schindler ancestors from Vienna at the beginning of the sixteenth century. Herr Hans Schindler, Oskar''s father, approved of the imperial arrangement, considered himself culturally an Austrian, and spoke German at the table, on the telephone, in business, in moments of tenderness. Yet when in 1918 Herr Schindler and the members of his family found themselves citizens of the Czechoslovak republic of Masaryk and Benes, it did not seem to cause any fundamental distress to the father, and even less still to his ten-year-old son. The child Hitler, according to
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From the Publisher

The acclaimed bestselling classic of Holocaust literature, winner of the Booker Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Award for Fiction, and the inspiration for the classic film—“a masterful account of the growth of the human soul” (Los Angeles Times Book Review).

A stunning novel based on the true story of how German war profiteer and factory director Oskar Schindler came to save more Jews from the gas chambers than any other single person during World War II. In this milestone of Holocaust literature, Thomas Keneally, author of Daughter of Mars, uses the actual testimony of the Schindlerjuden—Schindler’s Jews—to brilliantly portray the courage and cunning of a good man in the midst of unspeakable evil.

About the Author

Thomas Keneally was born in 1936 and raised in the rugged expanse of Australia. As a young man, he planned to join the priesthood, but by 1960, on the verge of the Vietnam War, Keneally found the church in such moral turmoil that he decided it was impossible to go through with his ordination. Keneally received his formal education in Sydney, Australia. Over the past 30 years, he has published over 25 novels, more than a dozen screenplays, and several works of non-fiction. These works include The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, The Playmaker, Season in Purgatory, A Family Madness , and Woman of the Inner Sea. His work has been nominated four times for the Booker Prize, which he won in 1982 for Schindler''s List . He won the Los Angeles Times Prize for Fiction, The Miles Franklin Award, The Critics Circle Award, and a Logie (Australian Emmy). A self-described "literary biker," Keneally has traveled through Australia, Iceland, Antarctica, America, Eastern Europe, roaming across genres and topics, often championing the underdog. "I''m a writer who''s always been hard to pin down," Keneally says, "because I''ve sometimes written about things that are none of my concern -- like the American South or Antarctica or Australian aboriginals or the Holocaust. I think I appeal to ''hells angels'' kind of writers." Keneally has modeled many of his characters after the traditional Australian hero -- the "battler." "In America everyone admires successful men and women. In Australia, they suspect
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From Our Editors

You've seen the movie Schindler's List - now read the Booker-winning novel that inspired Steven Spielberg's epic movie. It's an account of courage and heroism during this century's darkest hour, and tells the story of the man who outwitted the Nazis and saved more Jews than any other single person during the Second World War. Deeply moving from beginning to end, this is one novel that will haunt you long after you've finished reading it.

Editorial Reviews

"A truly heroic story of the war and, like the tree planted in Oskar Schindler''s honor in Jerusalem, a fitting memorial to the fight of one individual against the horror of Nazism."

Bookclub Guide

Reading Group Discussion Points
  1. Schindler''s List, while based on the true story of Oskar Schindler and the Schindler Jews, is fiction. At what point does this novel depart from the merely factual? What "liberties" does Thomas Keneally take that a non-fiction author could not?

  2. At the start of the book, Keneally lets us know that his protagonist, Oskar Schindler, is not a virtuous man, but rather a flawed, conflicted one, who makes no apology for his penchant for women and drink; yet he gambles millions to save the Jews under his care from the gas chambers. How does Keneally reconcile these two distinctly different sides of Oskar Schindler? How do you, the reader, reconcile them?

  3. Keneally writes, "And although Herr Schindler''s merit is well documented, it is a feature of his ambiguity that he worked within or, at least, on the strength of a corrupt and savage scheme, one that filled Europe with camps of varying but consistent inhumanity." What abiding differences were there between Oskar Schindler and men like Amon Goeth, who operated the controls of this system? To what extent did Schindler remain in partnership with them? Where did he draw the line, and how did he keep himself separate while living among them?

  4. Schindler and his mistress, Ingrid, ride their horses to the hill overlooking the Cracow ghetto, where they witness an Aktion. Trailing alone at the end of a line of people being marched off, Oskar and Ingrid spot a little girl in red, "the scarlet girl." What is it about her presence on this early morning that is instrumental in Oskar Schindler''s sudden and terrible understanding of what is happening in Europe and of his responsibility to mitigate it?

  5. "I am now resolved to do everything in my power to defeat the system," Schindler says after witnessing this Aktion. Do Schindler''s subsequent actions defeat the system, or does he merely help to perpetuate it?

  6. Keneally follows many other characters throughout the book: the prisoners, Itzhak Stern, Helen Hirsch, Poldek and Mila Pfefferberg, Josef and Rebecca, the Rosner brothers -- all of whom, at points, rise above their circumstances and engage in acts of great courage and generosity. In contrast, characters such as Spira and Chilowicz engage in acts of cruelty and self-interest. Yet they have similar circumstances. How do you feel about these different characters and their choices?

  7. "All our vision of deliverance is futile. We''ll have to wait a little longer for our freedom," Schindler says to Garde (a Brinnlitz prisoner) when they learn that the Fiihrer is still alive after an attempt on his life. Oskar speaks as if they are both prisoners waiting to be liberated, as if they have equivalent needs. What do you think Schindler means by "our freedom"? How might Schindler and other Germans have felt to be imprisoned? Is it fair for him to equate himself with Garde?

  8. After Brinnlitz is liberated, some of the prisoners take a German Kapo and hang him from a beam. Keneally writes, "It was an event, this first homicide of peace, which many Brinnlitz people would forever abhor. They had seen Amon hang poor engineer Krautwirt on the Appellplatz at Plaszow, and this hanging, though for different reasons, sickened them as profoundly." Why are so many of the prisoners sickened, in light of the atrocities committed against them? Do you feel the prisoners would have been justified in killing as many Germans as they could have? Why do you think there aren''t more rampant acts of vengeance on the part of Schindler''s Jews after their liberation?

  9. In a documentary made in 1973 by German television, Emilie Schindler remarked that Oskar had "done nothing astounding before the war and had been unexceptional since." She suggested that it was fortunate that between 1939 and 1945 he had met people who had summoned forth his "deeper talents." What are these "deeper talents" and what is it about war that elicits them? And what is it about peacetime that suppresses them?

  10. After the war, Schindler never reached the level of success he''d known during wartime. Both of his enterprises, a farm in Argentina and a cement factory in Frankfurt failed, and he was to fall back on Schindler''s Jews time and time again. They became his only emotional and financial security, and they would help him in many ways until the day he died. Keneally suggests that Schindler remained, in a most thorough sense, a hostage to Brinnlitz and Emalia. What might he mean by this? Do you agree?

  11. What vision of human nature does Schindler''s List express? Does it express the view of human beings as fundamentally good or evil? As immutable or capable of transformation? Does it leave you with any kind of a message, any vision for mankind? If so, what is it?
    Recommended Readings

    Diary of a Young Girl, Anne Frank

    Doubleday, 1967

    Dita Saxova, Arnost Lustig

    Northwestern University Press, 1979

    The Holocaust in History, Michael Marrus

    NAL/Dutton, 1989

    The Jews: Stories of a People, Howard M. Fast

    Dell, 1968

    Maus I and Maus II, Art Spiegelman

    Pantheon, 1991

    Night, Dawn, and Day, Elie Wiesel

    Jason Aronson, Inc., 1985

    One, By One, By One, Judith Miller

    Touchstone Books, 1990

    Sophie''s Choice, William Styron

    Vintage Books, 1979

    Stones from the River, Ursula Hegi

    Scribner Paperback Fiction, 1995

    The War Against the Jews: 1933-1945, Lucy Dawidowicz

    Bantam Books, 1986

    Winter in the Morning, Janina Bauman

    The Free Press, 1986

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