Seeing

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Seeing

by Jose Saramago

March 30, 2006 | Hardcover |

3.8 out of 5 rating. 10 Reviews
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On election day in the capital, it is raining so hard that no one has bothered to come out to vote. The politicians are growing jittery. What''s going on? Should they reschedule the elections for another day? Around three o''clock, the rain finally stops. Promptly at four, voters rush to the polling stations, as if they had been ordered to appear.

But when the ballots are counted, more than 70 percent are blank. The citizens are rebellious. A state of emergency is declared. The president proposes that a wall be built around the city to contain the revolution. But are the authorities acting too precipitously? Or even blindly? The word evokes terrible memories of the plague of blindness that had hit the city four years before, and of the one woman who kept her sight. Could she be behind the blank ballots? Is she the organizer of a conspiracy against the state? A police superintendent is put on the case.

What begins as a satire on governments and the sometimes dubious efficacy of the democratic system turns into something far more sinister. A singular novel from the author of Blindness.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 6.3 × 8.66 × 0.79 in

Published: March 30, 2006

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0151012385

ISBN - 13: 9780151012381

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– More About This Product –

Seeing

Seeing

by Jose Saramago

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 6.3 × 8.66 × 0.79 in

Published: March 30, 2006

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0151012385

ISBN - 13: 9780151012381

About the Book

From the Nobel Prize-winning author of "Blindness" comes this follow-up, set in the same capital city four years after being hit by an epidemic of blindness. What begins as a satire on governments and the sometimes dubious efficacy of the democratic system turns into something far more sinister.

Read from the Book

terrible voting weather, remarked the presiding officer of polling station fourteen as he snapped shut his soaked umbrella and took off the raincoat that had proved of little use to him during the breathless forty-meter dash from the place where he had parked his car to the door through which, heart pounding, he had just appeared. I hope I''m not the last, he said to the secretary, who was standing slightly away from the door, safe from the sheets of rain which, caught by the wind, were drenching the floor. Your deputy hasn''t arrived yet, but we''ve still got plenty of time, said the secretary soothingly, With rain like this, it''ll be a feat in itself if we all manage to get here, said the presiding officer as they went into the room where the voting would take place. He greeted, first, the poll clerks who would act as scrutineers and then the party representatives and their deputies. He was careful to address exactly the same words to all of them, not allowing his face or tone of voice to betray any political and ideological leanings of his own. A presiding officer, even of an ordinary polling station like this, should, in all circumstances, be guided by the strictest sense of independence, he should, in short, always observe decorum. As well as the general dampness, which made an already oppressive atmosphere still muggier, for the room had only two narrow windows that looked out onto a courtyard which was gloomy even on sunny days, there was a sense of unease which, to u
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From the Publisher

On election day in the capital, it is raining so hard that no one has bothered to come out to vote. The politicians are growing jittery. What''s going on? Should they reschedule the elections for another day? Around three o''clock, the rain finally stops. Promptly at four, voters rush to the polling stations, as if they had been ordered to appear.

But when the ballots are counted, more than 70 percent are blank. The citizens are rebellious. A state of emergency is declared. The president proposes that a wall be built around the city to contain the revolution. But are the authorities acting too precipitously? Or even blindly? The word evokes terrible memories of the plague of blindness that had hit the city four years before, and of the one woman who kept her sight. Could she be behind the blank ballots? Is she the organizer of a conspiracy against the state? A police superintendent is put on the case.

What begins as a satire on governments and the sometimes dubious efficacy of the democratic system turns into something far more sinister. A singular novel from the author of Blindness.

About the Author

JOSÉ SARAMAGO (1922-2010) was the author of many novels, among them Blindness, All the Names, Baltasar and Blimunda, and The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis. In 1998 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

MARGARET JULL COSTA has established herself as the premier translator of Portuguese literature into English today.

Editorial Reviews

PRAISE FOR BLINDNESS
"A shattering work by a literary master."-THE BOSTON GLOBE

"Saramago is the most tender of writers . . . with a clear-eyed and compassionate acknowledgment of things as they are, and a quality that can only be termed wisdom. We should be grateful when it is handed to us in such generous measure."
-THE NEW YORK TIMES

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