Stalinism and the Politics of Mobilization: Ideas, Power, and Terror in Inter-war Russia

by David Priestland

Oxford University Press | February 20, 2007 | Hardcover

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Stalinism and the Politics of Mobilization offers a new interpretation of Bolshevik ideology, examines its relationship with Soviet politics between 1917 and 1939, and sheds new light on the origins of the political violence of the late 1930s. While it challenges older views that the Stalinist system and the Terror were the product of a coherent Marxist-Leninist blueprint, imposed by a group of committed ideologues, it argues that ideas mattered in Bolshevik politics and that there are strong continuities between the politics of the revolutionary period and those of the 1930s. By exploring divisions within the party over several issues, including class, the relations between elites and masses, and economic policy, David Priestland shows how a number of ideological trends emerged within Bolshevik politics, and how they were related to political and economic interests and strategies. He also argues that central to the launching of the Terror was the leadership''s commitment to a strategy of mobilization, and to a view of politics that ultimately derived from the left Bolshevism of the revolutionary period.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 512 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.18 in

Published: February 20, 2007

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0199245134

ISBN - 13: 9780199245130

Found in: History

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Stalinism and the Politics of Mobilization: Ideas, Power, and Terror in Inter-war Russia

by David Priestland

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 512 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.18 in

Published: February 20, 2007

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0199245134

ISBN - 13: 9780199245130

About the Book

Stalin's Terror of 1937-8 is one of the most extraordinary events of the twentieth century. His seemingly irrational attack on the military, technical, and political A(c)lite on the eve of war, precisely the time when he needed them most, remains difficult to understand. Stalinism and the Politics of Terror provides a new explanation of the political violence of the late 1930s by examining the thinking of Stalin and his allies, and placing it in the broader context of Bolshevik ideas since 1917.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements Abbreviations and Glossary Introduction: Ideas and Politics in Bolshevic Russia 1. Victory and Fragmentation, 1917-1921 2. The Emergence of Left and Right, 1921-1927 3. Mobilization and ''Class Struggle'', 1928-1930 4. The Search for Unity and Order, 1930-1935 5. Mobilization and Terror, 1934-1939 Conclusion: Mobilization and ''Class Struggle''in Communist Politics Bibliography

From the Publisher

Stalinism and the Politics of Mobilization offers a new interpretation of Bolshevik ideology, examines its relationship with Soviet politics between 1917 and 1939, and sheds new light on the origins of the political violence of the late 1930s. While it challenges older views that the Stalinist system and the Terror were the product of a coherent Marxist-Leninist blueprint, imposed by a group of committed ideologues, it argues that ideas mattered in Bolshevik politics and that there are strong continuities between the politics of the revolutionary period and those of the 1930s. By exploring divisions within the party over several issues, including class, the relations between elites and masses, and economic policy, David Priestland shows how a number of ideological trends emerged within Bolshevik politics, and how they were related to political and economic interests and strategies. He also argues that central to the launching of the Terror was the leadership''s commitment to a strategy of mobilization, and to a view of politics that ultimately derived from the left Bolshevism of the revolutionary period.

About the Author

David Priestland is a Fellow and Tutor in Modern History, St Edmund Hall, Oxford.
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