Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre…

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Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre…

by Douglas Gibson

ECW Press | October 1, 2011 | Hardcover

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Spotlighting an extraordinary career, this autobiography reviews the author’s accomplishments working—and playing—alongside some of Canada’s greatest writers. These humorous chronicles relate the projects he brainstormed for writer Barry Broadfoot, how he convinced eventual Nobel Prize contender Alice Munro to keep writing short stories, his early morning phone call from a former Prime Minister, and his recollection of yanking a manuscript right out of Alistair MacLeod’s own reluctant hands—which ultimately garnered MacLeod one of the world’s most prestigious prizes for fiction. Insightful and entertaining, this collection of tales provides an inside view of Canadian politics and publishing that is rarely revealed, going behind the scenes and between the covers to divulge a treasure trove of literary adventures.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 392 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.5 in

Published: October 1, 2011

Publisher: ECW Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1770410686

ISBN - 13: 9781770410688

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– More About This Product –

Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre…

by Douglas Gibson

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 392 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.5 in

Published: October 1, 2011

Publisher: ECW Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1770410686

ISBN - 13: 9781770410688

About the Book

Spotlighting an extraordinary career, this autobiography reviews the author's accomplishments working--and playing--alongside some of Canada's greatest writers. These humorous chronicles relate the projects he brainstormed for writer Barry Broadfoot, how he convinced eventual Nobel Prize contender Alice Munro to keep writing short stories, his early morning phone call from a former Prime Minister, and his recollection of yanking a manuscript right out of Alistair MacLeod's own reluctant hands--which ultimately garnered MacLeod one of the world's most prestigious prizes for fiction. Insightful and entertaining, this collection of tales provides an inside view of Canadian politics and publishing that is rarely revealed, going behind the scenes and between the covers to divulge a treasure trove of literary adventures.

Read from the Book

From STEPHEN LEACOCK 1869–1944 Professor, Humourist, and Immigration Agent In my experience, every humorous writer finds that his or her public confidently expects them to be a happy person, facing life with a wry chuckle, and perhaps a slow, smiling shake of the head. To his great credit, Leacock tried to shoot down this view. He wrote: “If a man has a genuine sense of humour he is apt to take a somewhat melancholy, or at least a disillusioned view of life. Humour and disillusionment are twin sisters.” Robertson Davies (who knew more than most people about the expectations placed on successful authors in their private lives) wrote in his 1981 introduction to The Penguin Stephen Leacock, “I have written a good deal about Leacock, and I believe that I was the first to press the point that he was not necessarily a man of continuously sunny, carefree temperament…. He had, in fact, the temperament of a humorist, and they are by no means unfailingly sunny people.” Leacock’s life was not short of events that would have disillusioned anyone. His family (of, eventually, eleven children) came from England to rural Ontario and a life of genteel poverty (the boys were not allowed to go barefoot in the summer, like the other local kids; a matter, Leacock later said, “of caste and thistles”). The father, Peter, was a Catholic whose runaway marriage was never accepted by his wife’s Anglican family (and to make matters worse the br
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From the Publisher

Spotlighting an extraordinary career, this autobiography reviews the author’s accomplishments working—and playing—alongside some of Canada’s greatest writers. These humorous chronicles relate the projects he brainstormed for writer Barry Broadfoot, how he convinced eventual Nobel Prize contender Alice Munro to keep writing short stories, his early morning phone call from a former Prime Minister, and his recollection of yanking a manuscript right out of Alistair MacLeod’s own reluctant hands—which ultimately garnered MacLeod one of the world’s most prestigious prizes for fiction. Insightful and entertaining, this collection of tales provides an inside view of Canadian politics and publishing that is rarely revealed, going behind the scenes and between the covers to divulge a treasure trove of literary adventures.

About the Author

Doug Gibson worked as an editor and publisher from 1968 until he retired from McClelland & Stewart in 2009. His Douglas Gibson Books was Canada’s first editorial imprint, and lives on. Gibson lives in Toronto, ON.

Editorial Reviews

"Gibson is an engaging and on the whole a modest figure and a very fine raconteur. He, too, has had a hell of an interesting life. His book makes for good reading, and he makes his life in publishing sound like great fun." —Globe and Mail (October 29, 2011)
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