Strength In What Remains

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

Strength In What Remains

by Tracy Kidder

Random House Publishing Group | May 4, 2010 | Trade Paperback |

Not yet rated | write a review
In Strength in What Remains, Tracy Kidder gives us the story of one man's inspiring American journey and of the ordinary people who helped him, providing brilliant testament to the power of second chances. Deo arrives in the United States from Burundi in search of a new life. Having survived a civil war and genocide, he lands at JFK airport with two hundred dollars, no English, and no contacts. He ekes out a precarious existence delivering groceries, living in Central Park, and learning English by reading dictionaries in bookstores. Then Deo begins to meet the strangers who will change his life, pointing him eventually in the direction of Columbia University, medical school, and a life devoted to healing. Kidder breaks new ground in telling this unforgettable story as he travels with Deo back over a turbulent life and shows us what it means to be fully human.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.39 in

Published: May 4, 2010

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0812977610

ISBN - 13: 9780812977615

save
28%

In Stock

$14.44

Online Price

$19.00 List Price

or, Used from $5.04

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

All available formats:

Check store inventory (prices may vary)

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Strength In What Remains

Strength In What Remains

by Tracy Kidder

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.39 in

Published: May 4, 2010

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0812977610

ISBN - 13: 9780812977615

About the Book

In Strength in What Remains, Tracy Kidder gives us the story of one man's inspiring American journey and of the ordinary people who helped him, providing brilliant testament to the power of second chances. Deo arrives in the United States from Burundi in search of a new life. Having survived a civil war and genocide, he lands at JFK airport with two hundred dollars, no English, and no contacts. He ekes out a precarious existence delivering groceries, living in Central Park, and learning English by reading dictionaries in bookstores. Then Deo begins to meet the strangers who will change his life, pointing him eventually in the direction of Columbia University, medical school, and a life devoted to healing. Kidder breaks new ground in telling this unforgettable story as he travels with Deo back over a turbulent life and shows us what it means to be fully human.

Read from the Book

Part One, Flights   Chapter One Bujumbura-NewYork, May 1994   On the outskirts of the capital, Bujumbura, there is a small international airport. It has a modern terminal with intricate roofs and domed metal structures that resemble astronomical observatories. It is the kind of terminal that seems designed to say that here you leave the past behind, the future has arrived, behold the wonders of aviation. But in Burundi in 1994, for the lucky few with tickets, an airplane was just the fastest, safest way out. It was flight.   In the spring of that year, violence and chaos governed Burundi. To the west, the hills above Bujumbura were burning. Smoke seemed to be pouring off the hills, as the winds of mid-May carried the plumes of smoke downward in undulating sheets, in the general direction of the airport. A large passenger jet was parked on the tarmac, and a disordered crowd was heading toward it in sweaty haste. Deo felt as if he were being carried by the crowd, immersed in an unfamiliar river. The faces around him were mostly white, and though many were black or brown, there was no one whom he recognized, and so far as he could tell there were no country people. As a little boy, he had crouched behind rocks or under trees the first times he''d seen airplanes passing overhead. He had never been so close to a plane before. Except for buildings in the capital, this was the largest man-made thing he''d ever seen. He mounted the staircase quickly. Only when he had e
read more read less

From the Publisher

In Strength in What Remains, Tracy Kidder gives us the story of one man's inspiring American journey and of the ordinary people who helped him, providing brilliant testament to the power of second chances. Deo arrives in the United States from Burundi in search of a new life. Having survived a civil war and genocide, he lands at JFK airport with two hundred dollars, no English, and no contacts. He ekes out a precarious existence delivering groceries, living in Central Park, and learning English by reading dictionaries in bookstores. Then Deo begins to meet the strangers who will change his life, pointing him eventually in the direction of Columbia University, medical school, and a life devoted to healing. Kidder breaks new ground in telling this unforgettable story as he travels with Deo back over a turbulent life and shows us what it means to be fully human.

From the Jacket

Praise for Tracy Kidder's Strength In What Remains

"That 63-year-old Tracy Kidder may have just written his finest work -- indeed, one of the truly stunning books I've read this year -- is proof that the secret to memorable nonfiction is so often the writer's readiness to be surprised. Deo's experience can feel like this era's version of the Ellis Island migration. Deo is propelled, so often, by pure will, and his victories…summon a feeling of restored confidence in human nature and American opportunity. Then we plunge into hell. Having only glimpses of Deo's past, we suddenly get a full-blown portrait. Kidder's rendering of what Deo endured and survived just before he boarded the plane for New York is one of the most powerful passages of modern nonfiction."
-Ron Suskind, The New York Time Book Review

"Kidder tells Deo's story with characteristic skill and sensitivity in a complex narrative that moves back and forth through time to build a richly layered portrait. One of the pleasures of reading Kidder is that sooner or later, in most of his books, someone puts us in mind of the closing lines from ``Middlemarch'': ``For the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.''"
-Boston Globe

"A tale of unspeakable barbarism and unshakeable strength." -Time Magazine

"It is a mark of the skill and ­empathy of Mr. Kidder, a Pulitzer Prize-winning ­author, that he makes Deo's story come alive believably-as the experience of a real ­individual-and avoids…the usual tropes of a ­triumph-of-the- human-spirit tale. [T]he book encourages a general hope that individuals can ­transcend even the greatest horrors."
-Wall Street Journal

"Strength in What Remains" builds in magnitude and poignancy. It is moving without being uplifting, because Kidder has the intelligence to avoid any hint of the saccharine within its pages." -Chicago Tribune

"[Tracy Kidder's] kind of literary journalism…involves seeing the world through the eyes of those he writes about; not judging them, simply presenting them as they move through life… Kidder is one of the best, if not the best, at it, garnering a Pulitzer, a National Book Award and generations of grateful readers." -Susan Salter Reynolds, The Los Angeles Times

"In its sober ability to astonish, this may well be Tracy Kidder's best book."
-Cleveland Plain Dealer

"Tracy Kidder's new book "Strength in What Remains" is...a narrative infused with a broad, universal appeal and occasional touches of brilliance. He offers us fine prose, complex characters, and realistic portrayals. Deo's resilience, his struggle to overcome adversity strikes a chord in all of us. His story reaffirms our hope that one person can make a difference... [T]his book is one not to be missed. -Seattle Times

Tracy Kidder is probably one of the few authors alive who can craft a narrative from the extremes of despair and hope and make it work beautifully. Kidder is a master of creative nonfiction, employing both journalistic and novelistic techniques to tell a true story, compellingly. -Steve Weinberg, Raleigh News & Observer

"With an anthropologist's eye and a novelist's pen, Pulitzer Prize-winning Kidder (Mountains Beyond Mountains) recounts the story of Deo, the Burundian former medical student turned American émigré at the center of this strikingly vivid story…. This profoundly gripping, hopeful and crucial testament is a work of the utmost skill, sympathy and moral clarity."
-Publishers Weekly ( starred review)

"A tale of ethnocide, exile and healing by a master of narrative nonfiction…. Terrifying at turns, but tremendously inspiring…a key document in the growing literature devoted to postgenocidal justice." -Kirkus Reviews

"Read this book, and it's one that you will not likely forget. The story of a journey, classical in its way, but contemporary and very modern in its details. It's written with such simplicity and lucidity that it transcends the moment and becomes as powerful and compelling as those journeys of myth." -Jonathan Harr, author of A Civil Action and The Lost Painting

"The reporting is impeccable, but it's Kidder's great feat of sympathetic imagination that dazzles. Walk a mile in Deo's shoes; your world will be larger and darker for it."
-William Finnegan, author of Cold New World and Crossing the Line

"The journey of Deo achieves mythic importance in Tracy Kidder's expert hands."
-Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, author of Random Family

"Tracy Kidder's Strength in What Remains is a tour de force. Inspiring. Moving. Gripping. Deo's story is remarkable, stunning really. His journey is the story of our times, one that keeps the rest of us from forgetting. This book will stir the conscience and resurrect your faith in the human spirit." -Alex Kotlowitz, author of There Are No Children Here

"Believe me, at the end of this riveting narrative, your eyes will not be dry."
-Adam Hochschild, author of King Leopold's Ghost



From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Tracy Kidder graduated from Harvard and studied at the University of Iowa. He has won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Award, and many other literary prizes. The author of Mountains Beyond Mountains, My Detachment, Home Town, Old Friends, Among Schoolchildren, House, and The Soul of a New Machine, Kidder lives in Massachusetts and Maine.

Editorial Reviews

Praise for Tracy Kidder’s Strength In What Remains “That 63-year-old Tracy Kidder may have just written his finest work -- indeed, one of the truly stunning books I''ve read this year -- is proof that the secret to memorable nonfiction is so often the writer’s readiness to be surprised. Deo’s experience can feel like this era’s version of the Ellis Island migration. Deo is propelled, so often, by pure will, and his victories…summon a feeling of restored confidence in human nature and American opportunity. Then we plunge into hell. Having only glimpses of Deo’s past, we suddenly get a full-blown portrait. Kidder’s rendering of what Deo endured and survived just before he boarded the plane for New York is one of the most powerful passages of modern nonfiction.” –Ron Suskind, The New York Time Book Review “Kidder tells Deo''s story with characteristic skill and sensitivity in a complex narrative that moves back and forth through time to build a richly layered portrait. One of the pleasures of reading Kidder is that sooner or later, in most of his books, someone puts us in mind of the closing lines from ``Middlemarch'''': ``For the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.''''” –Boston Globe “A tale of unspeakab
read more read less

Bookclub Guide

1. Tracy Kidder gets his title, Strength in What Remains, from a poem by William Wordsworth; the passage is included at the beginning of the book. What did the poem mean to you before reading Strength in What Remains? Did the meaning of the poem change after you read the book? If so, how? 

2. While making his escape to the United States, Deo views New York as a land of promise and opportunity. But when he is first in New York, living in Harlem and then Central Park, he feels lonelier than ever before. He thinks, "It was clear that to be a New Yorker could mean so many things that it meant practically nothing at all" (p. 32). What does he mean by this? How does his opinion of New York- and thus the United States- change over the course of the book? 

3. Deo realizes that he is in the "bottom to that near- bottom" (p. 22) of the social hierarchy in New York, yet he makes certain that no one observes him entering Central Park at a late hour, as he does not want to be labeled homeless. What do these two facts, along with his initial struggles to adjust to and learn about urban American life, tell you about Deo's character? Can you imagine yourself feeling as he does or do you think his reaction is simply "Burundian"? 

4. Kidder writes, "When Deo first told me about his beginnings in New York, I had a simple thought: 'I would not have survived' " (p. 161). Do you think you could have survived what Deo survived? Why or why not? 

5. How do Deo's experiences on the run in Burundi compare to his experiences in New York City? What are the common themes? How do the dangers differ? How does human compassion figure in these two journeys? 

6. From the moment Deo arrives in New York, he finds people who are willing to help him. Discuss the ways in which Muhammad the baggage handler, Sharon, Nancy and Charlie, and James O'Malley helped Deo get on his feet. What do you think it was about Deo that compelled these people to help him? What was it about them? Would he have survived without them? 

7. Paul Farmer is another person who has had a large influence on Deo. Describe Deo's relationship with Farmer and the ways in which they change each other's lives. 

8. While a student at Columbia, Deo recalls that in Burundi, he "had seen people pushed away from hospitals, not only when they had no money, but sometimes just because they were dirty and smelled bad. Now news that a relative was ill would keep him worrying for days, imagining that his mother or a sibling might even now be receiving such treatment" (p. 109). What does this statement tell you about Deo's thoughts and goals while studying biochemistry at Columbia? Why do you think Deo maintained this perspective? How does this sentiment complement, reflect, or contrast with the views and concerns of Paul Farmer or of Partners in Health? 

9. While Deo is working with Farmer and Joia Mukherjee at Partners in Health in Boston, Joia remarks, "Offensive things are so offensive to him. Understandably. It's just like he has no skin. Everything just penetrates so much" (p. 156). What does Joia mean by this? Do her words ring true? 

10. Throughout his life, Deo struggles to trust himself, other people, and even God. As he tours Columbia with Kidder in 2006, he says, "I do believe in God. I think God has given so much power to people, and intelligence, and said, 'Well, you are on your own. Maybe I'm tired, I need a nap. You are mature. Why don't you look after yourselves?' And I think he's been sleeping too much" (p. 186). Discuss this quote in relation to Deo's views on faith. 

11. The power of memory is a theme that runs throughout the book. In the Introduction, Deo explains that people in the Western world try to remember the tragedies of their pasts, while people in Burundi try to forget them. Trace Deo's evolution as he journeys from Burundi to Rwanda to the United States and back again, focusing on the changing role memory plays in his life. 

12. Joia makes an interesting point about how different people deal with horrible experiences like genocide. Her own father, having survived massacres during the partition of India, refused to talk about what he saw. Instead, he lived a life of hypochondria, always fearing that death was just around the corner. Deo eventually "let it spew out all the time" (p. 157), while an Auschwitz survivor Kidder meets also chose silence until he reached old age. The survivor tells Kidder, "The problem is, once you start talking it's very difficult to stop. It's almost impossible to stop" (p. 160). Discuss the values and weaknesses of each coping strategy. Do you think we have control over how we process our memories and guilt? 

13. Toward the end of the book, as Kidder reflects on what he has seen and learned through Deo, he thinks about the value of "flush[ing] out and dissect[ing] one's memories" (as Westerners are prone to do) and wonders whether there is such a thing as "too much remembering, that too much of it could suffocate a person, and indeed a culture" (p. 248). After reading Deo's story, what do you think? Do you agree that "there was something to be said for a culture with a word like gusimbura" (p. 248)? Why or why not? 

14. In Burundi, village elders would say, "When too much is too much or too bad is too bad, we laugh as if it was too good" (p. 36). What does this saying mean? How can it be applied to Deo's upbringing? How does its meaning affect Deo's views, particularly toward American life? 

15. Deo relates that in Burundi, people's names tell stories, or serve as social commentary about the circumstances of the person's birth or social position. These names, he says, are amazina y'ikuzo,  "names for growth" (p. 34). Why is this concept so important in Burundian society? Are the names of the Burundian individuals to whom Kidder introduces us accurate? 

16. Against his family's wishes, Deo returns to Burundi often after his initial escape. Why does he go back so many times? Discuss the relationship he has with the people of his country, and why he tells Kidder that no matter how tempting, he cannot "reject all the obli - gations of family, and even of affection, and . . . become a loner in the world, never setting foot in one's old life" (p. 208). 

17. When Deo was first in New York, Kidder writes, "He told himself, 'No one is in control of his own life' " (p. 164). Do you believe no one is in control of his own life? Do you think Deo believes it, at the end of Kidder's book? 

18. Deo accomplishes the seemingly impossible, working with Paul Farmer and Partners in Health to set up his dream clinic in Kigutu in 2008. The clinic has become "a place of reconciliation for everyone, including [Deo]." As he tells a woman who comes to the clinic and apologizes to him for what he assumes is violence against his family during the war: "What happened happened. Let's work on the clinic. Lets put this tragedy behind us, because remembering is not going to benefit anyone" (p. 259). How does Deo reach this point in his life? What do you think is next for him?  

Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart