The 13 Clocks

by James Thurber
Illustrator Marc Simont
Introduction by Neil Gaiman

New York Review Books | July 29, 2008 | Hardcover

Not yet rated | write a review
Once upon a time, in a gloomy castle on a lonely hill, where there were thirteen clocks that wouldn't go, there lived a cold, aggressive Duke, and his niece, the Princess Saralinda. She was warm in every wind and weather, but he was always cold. His hands were as cold as his smile, and almost as cold as his heart. He wore gloves when he was asleep, and he wore gloves when he was awake, which made it difficult for him to pick up pins or coins or the kernels of nuts, or to tear the wings from nightingales.

So begins James Thurber's sublimely revamped fairy tale, The 13 Clocks, in which a wicked Duke who imagines he has killed time, and the Duke's beautiful niece, for whom time seems to have run out, both meet their match, courtesy of an enterprising and very handsome prince in disguise. Readers young and old will take pleasure in this tale of love forestalled but ultimately fulfilled, admiring its upstanding hero ("He yearned to find in a far land the princess of his dreams, singing as he went, and possibly slaying a dragon here and there") and unapologetic villain ("We all have flaws," the Duke said. "Mine is being wicked"), while wondering at the enigmatic Golux, the mysterious stranger whose unpredictable interventions speed the story to its necessarily happy end.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 136 pages, 8.4 × 6.41 × 0.6 in

Published: July 29, 2008

Publisher: New York Review Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1590172752

ISBN - 13: 9781590172759

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

save
28%

In Stock Not yet released

$12.88  ea

Online Price

$16.95 List Price

or, Used from $9.48

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Reviews

– More About This Product –

The 13 Clocks

by James Thurber
Illustrator Marc Simont
Introduction by Neil Gaiman

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 136 pages, 8.4 × 6.41 × 0.6 in

Published: July 29, 2008

Publisher: New York Review Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1590172752

ISBN - 13: 9781590172759

From the Publisher

Once upon a time, in a gloomy castle on a lonely hill, where there were thirteen clocks that wouldn't go, there lived a cold, aggressive Duke, and his niece, the Princess Saralinda. She was warm in every wind and weather, but he was always cold. His hands were as cold as his smile, and almost as cold as his heart. He wore gloves when he was asleep, and he wore gloves when he was awake, which made it difficult for him to pick up pins or coins or the kernels of nuts, or to tear the wings from nightingales.

So begins James Thurber's sublimely revamped fairy tale, The 13 Clocks, in which a wicked Duke who imagines he has killed time, and the Duke's beautiful niece, for whom time seems to have run out, both meet their match, courtesy of an enterprising and very handsome prince in disguise. Readers young and old will take pleasure in this tale of love forestalled but ultimately fulfilled, admiring its upstanding hero ("He yearned to find in a far land the princess of his dreams, singing as he went, and possibly slaying a dragon here and there") and unapologetic villain ("We all have flaws," the Duke said. "Mine is being wicked"), while wondering at the enigmatic Golux, the mysterious stranger whose unpredictable interventions speed the story to its necessarily happy end.

About the Author

James Thurber (1894-1961), one of the outstanding American humorists and cartoonists of the twentieth century, was born in Columbus, Ohio, and launched his professional writing career as a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch in 1920. He began writing for The New Yorker in 1927 after his friend E. B. White got him a job at the magazine. Though hampered by failing eyesight, Thurber wrote nearly forty books, including collections of essays, short stories, fables, and children's stories. He won a Tony Award for his popular Broadway play, A Thurber Carnival.

 

Marc Simont (1915-2013) illustrated nearly a hundred books. He won a Caldecott Honor in 1950 for illustrating Ruth Krauss's The Happy Day, and in 1957 he was awarded the Caldecott Medal for his pictures in A Tree Is Nice by Janice May Udry. He is the illustrator for The New York Review Children's Collection books The Backward Day and The Wonderful O.

 

Neil Gaiman is an award-winning author of novels, short stories, children''s books, and graphic novels. Among his works are the children''s books Coraline, The Wolves in the Walls, and The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish; the Sandman graphic novels series; and the fantasy novels Stardust and Smoke and Mirrors. Originally from England, Gaiman now lives in the United States.

Editorial Reviews

"There has never been anything like this before, and there will never be anything like this again…[Thurber] takes such delight in the words. It''s like it''s written by somebody who wants to infect you with his love of words. There are poems hidden in the text. There are places where it wanders into rhyme and out again. There are all of the invented words. The story itself is nonsense in the finest possible way." —Neil Gaiman, interviewed in The Wall Street Journal "It''s a modern take on the standard fairy tale... if you liked ''The Princess Bride,'' you''re going to like this. If you like a book by Jules Feiffer, ''A Barrel of Laughs, A Vale of Tears,'' you''ll like this. If you remember ''Fractured Fairy Tales'' on Rocky and Bullwinkle, you''ll like this. We suggest, read the beginning. We''re not going to give away the plot, because it''s all in the language with a book like this."  —Daniel Pinkwater,  NPR Weekend Edition Saturday "The great New Yorker humorist James Thurber wrote a few children''s books, the best of which may be The 13 Clocks , a 1950 tale of a wicked duke who thinks he has stopped time. Newly reissued, with an intro by Neil Gaiman — who calls it ''''probably the best book in the world'''' — Clocks is the equal of any modern kid classic. By the time he wrote The 13 Clocks , Thurber was too blind to provide his own usual scratchy but vivid illustrations, so he enlisted his friend Marc Simont to do the drawings. Sim
read more read less

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart