The brassbounder

by David William Bone

General Books LLC | October 24, 2012 | Trade Paperback

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ... PREFACE TO A NEW EDITION TO-DAY the weather, that has been fine since we left New York, has thickened. The brisk north wind that kept the sea-line clear died away to fitful airs during the night. Fog has closed in on us and we go slowly, blindly,--tapping our way by soundings of the depths,--over the undersea ridges and gullies that lead on to Cape Race. Since an hour before daybreak we have seen nothing, heard nothing, of seaneighbours or of the world beyond the limits of our bulwarks. The horizon,--blurred indefinite circle of a ship''s length,--shows little sign of expanding to the hard blue division of sea and sky that is at present chiefly our desire. North Adantic weather! Nine months winter and three months fogl Monotonous in its persistence, the fog has yet a certain quality of variety. With the passing of a fine quiet night, came dense cloudy vapours that hung closely to the ship, shrouding the decks and upperworks in an impenetrable pall. Roused,-- perhaps cheerful by benison of a sound night''s rest,--we were optimistic. "Morning vapours," said we, as we rang "slow" to the engine room. "The pride o'' th* morning, no doubt 1 Huh/ The sun will clear this off when he has a good look at it." . , . Two hours, . , , three hours, . . . four, . . ( the clouds of vapour that had robbed us of our sight turned to wet mist, grey and depressing. Hoar formed on the awning spars and stanchions; moisture trickled to the decks and soaked the planking underfoot: it was time to turn up coat collars and settle caps. "Scotch mist" we called it,--thinking hopefully of a drying up in process with the sun climbing over the mastheads. Vain hope. Now--in waning afternoon--it has settled to a deep white haze and through it the treacherous sunlight dapples...

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 108 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.22 in

Published: October 24, 2012

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1458911268

ISBN - 13: 9781458911261

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– More About This Product –

The brassbounder

by David William Bone

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 108 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.22 in

Published: October 24, 2012

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1458911268

ISBN - 13: 9781458911261

About the Book

This is an OCR edition without illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from GeneralBooksClub.com. You can also preview excerpts from the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Original Published by: E. P. Dutton & company in 1921 in 308 pages; Subjects: Fiction / Historical; History / General; Juvenile Fiction / Action & Adventure / General; Sports & Recreation / Boating; Sports & Recreation / Sailing; Transportation / Ships & Shipbuilding / General; Travel / Essays & Travelogues;

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ... PREFACE TO A NEW EDITION TO-DAY the weather, that has been fine since we left New York, has thickened. The brisk north wind that kept the sea-line clear died away to fitful airs during the night. Fog has closed in on us and we go slowly, blindly,--tapping our way by soundings of the depths,--over the undersea ridges and gullies that lead on to Cape Race. Since an hour before daybreak we have seen nothing, heard nothing, of seaneighbours or of the world beyond the limits of our bulwarks. The horizon,--blurred indefinite circle of a ship''s length,--shows little sign of expanding to the hard blue division of sea and sky that is at present chiefly our desire. North Adantic weather! Nine months winter and three months fogl Monotonous in its persistence, the fog has yet a certain quality of variety. With the passing of a fine quiet night, came dense cloudy vapours that hung closely to the ship, shrouding the decks and upperworks in an impenetrable pall. Roused,-- perhaps cheerful by benison of a sound night''s rest,--we were optimistic. "Morning vapours," said we, as we rang "slow" to the engine room. "The pride o'' th* morning, no doubt 1 Huh/ The sun will clear this off when he has a good look at it." . , . Two hours, . , , three hours, . . . four, . . ( the clouds of vapour that had robbed us of our sight turned to wet mist, grey and depressing. Hoar formed on the awning spars and stanchions; moisture trickled to the decks and soaked the planking underfoot: it was time to turn up coat collars and settle caps. "Scotch mist" we called it,--thinking hopefully of a drying up in process with the sun climbing over the mastheads. Vain hope. Now--in waning afternoon--it has settled to a deep white haze and through it the treacherous sunlight dapples...
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