The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism

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The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism

by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Simon & Schuster | November 5, 2013 | Hardcover

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism is rated 5 out of 5 by 1.
One of the Best Books of the Year as chosen by The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Economist, Time, USA TODAY, Christian Science Monitor, and more. “A tale so gripping that one questions the need for fiction when real life is so plump with drama and intrigue” (Associated Press).

The gap between rich and poor has never been wider…legislative stalemate paralyzes the country…corporations resist federal regulations…spectacular mergers produce giant companies…the influence of money in politics deepens…bombs explode in crowded streets…small wars proliferate far from our shores…a dizzying array of inventions speeds the pace of daily life.

These unnervingly familiar headlines serve as the backdrop for Doris Kearns Goodwin’s highly anticipated The Bully Pulpit—a dynamic history of the first decade of the Progressive era, that tumultuous time when the nation was coming unseamed and reform was in the air.

The story is told through the intense friendship of Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft—a close relationship that strengthens both men before it ruptures in 1912, when they engage in a brutal fight for the presidential nomination that divides their wives, their children, and their closest friends, while crippling the progressive wing of the Republican Party, causing Democrat Woodrow Wilson to be elected, and changing the country’s history.

The Bully Pulpit is also the story of the muckraking press, which arouses the spirit of reform that helps Roosevelt push the government to shed its laissez-faire attitude toward robber barons, corrupt politicians, and corporate exploiters of our natural resources. The muckrakers are portrayed through the greatest group of journalists ever assembled at one magazine—Ida Tarbell, Ray Stannard Baker, Lincoln Steffens, and William Allen White—teamed under the mercurial genius of publisher S. S. McClure.

Goodwin’s narrative is founded upon a wealth of primary materials. The correspondence of more than four hundred letters between Roosevelt and Taft begins in their early thirties and ends only months before Roosevelt’s death. Edith Roosevelt and Nellie Taft kept diaries. The muckrakers wrote hundreds of letters to one another, kept journals, and wrote their memoirs. The letters of Captain Archie Butt, who served as a personal aide to both Roosevelt and Taft, provide an intimate view of both men.

The Bully Pulpit, like Goodwin’s brilliant chronicles of the Civil War and World War II, exquisitely demonstrates her distinctive ability to combine scholarly rigor with accessibility. It is a major work of history—an examination of leadership in a rare moment of activism and reform that brought the country closer to its founding ideals.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 928 pages, 9.25 × 6.25 × 2 in

Published: November 5, 2013

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 141654786X

ISBN - 13: 9781416547860

Found in: History
It’s been almost a decade since Doris Kearns Goodwin wrote the incredibly influential A Team of Rivals. Now she’s given us The Bully Pulpit, the story of Teddy Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the chaotic, dynamic America they led one hundred years ago. Her timing could not have been better. A polarized country, pit-bull reporters, greedy Wall-streeters, and corrupt politicians. Change the names and dates and this would be a book about modern politics – every page is relevant to our challenges, issues, and frustrations today. And more than that, The Bully Pulpit is packed with larger than life personalities; from reporters, publishers, and tycoons to Roosevelt himself. In Goodwin’s hands these characters explode off the page and turn a political profile into a riveting, entertaining story, as much a thrilling read as a definitive work of history. It should absolutely be a cornerstone for your history shelf.

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A riveting, entertaining story! It’s been almost a decade since Doris Kearns Goodwin wrote the incredibly influential A Team of Rivals. Now she’s given us The Bully Pulpit, the story of Teddy Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the chaotic, dynamic America they led one hundred years ago. Her timing could not have been better. A polarized country, pit-bull reporters, greedy Wall-streeters, and corrupt politicians. Change the names and dates and this would be a book about modern politics – every page is relevant to our challenges, issues, and frustrations today. And more than that, The Bully Pulpit is packed with larger than life personalities; from reporters, publishers, and tycoons to Roosevelt himself. In Goodwin’s hands these characters explode off the page and turn a political profile into a riveting, entertaining story, as much a thrilling read as a definitive work of history. It should absolutely be a cornerstone for your history shelf.
Date published: 2014-09-29

– More About This Product –

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism

by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 928 pages, 9.25 × 6.25 × 2 in

Published: November 5, 2013

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 141654786X

ISBN - 13: 9781416547860

Read from the Book

The Bully Pulpit CHAPTER ONE The Hunter Returns Theodore Roosevelt receives a hero’s welcome in New York on June 18, 1910, following his expedition to Africa. ROOSEVELT IS COMING HOME, HOORAY! Exultant headlines in mid-June 1910 trumpeted the daily progress of the Kaiserin, the luxury liner returning the former president, Theodore Roosevelt, to American shores after his year’s safari in Africa. Despite popularity unrivaled since Abraham Lincoln, Roosevelt, true to his word, had declined to run for a third term after completing seven and a half years in office. His tenure had stretched from William McKinley’s assassination in September 1901 to March 4, 1909, when his own elected term came to an end. Flush from his November 1904 election triumph, he had stunned the political world with his announcement that he would not run for president again, citing “the wise custom which limits the President to two terms.” Later, he reportedly told a friend that he would willingly cut off his hand at the wrist if he could take his pledge back. Roosevelt had loved being president— “the greatest office in the world.” He had relished “every hour” of every day. Indeed, fearing the “dull thud” he would experience upon returning to private life, he had devised the perfect solution to “break his fall.” Within three weeks of the inauguration of his successor, William Howard Taft, he had embarked on his great African
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From the Publisher

One of the Best Books of the Year as chosen by The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Economist, Time, USA TODAY, Christian Science Monitor, and more. “A tale so gripping that one questions the need for fiction when real life is so plump with drama and intrigue” (Associated Press).

The gap between rich and poor has never been wider…legislative stalemate paralyzes the country…corporations resist federal regulations…spectacular mergers produce giant companies…the influence of money in politics deepens…bombs explode in crowded streets…small wars proliferate far from our shores…a dizzying array of inventions speeds the pace of daily life.

These unnervingly familiar headlines serve as the backdrop for Doris Kearns Goodwin’s highly anticipated The Bully Pulpit—a dynamic history of the first decade of the Progressive era, that tumultuous time when the nation was coming unseamed and reform was in the air.

The story is told through the intense friendship of Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft—a close relationship that strengthens both men before it ruptures in 1912, when they engage in a brutal fight for the presidential nomination that divides their wives, their children, and their closest friends, while crippling the progressive wing of the Republican Party, causing Democrat Woodrow Wilson to be elected, and changing the country’s history.

The Bully Pulpit is also the story of the muckraking press, which arouses the spirit of reform that helps Roosevelt push the government to shed its laissez-faire attitude toward robber barons, corrupt politicians, and corporate exploiters of our natural resources. The muckrakers are portrayed through the greatest group of journalists ever assembled at one magazine—Ida Tarbell, Ray Stannard Baker, Lincoln Steffens, and William Allen White—teamed under the mercurial genius of publisher S. S. McClure.

Goodwin’s narrative is founded upon a wealth of primary materials. The correspondence of more than four hundred letters between Roosevelt and Taft begins in their early thirties and ends only months before Roosevelt’s death. Edith Roosevelt and Nellie Taft kept diaries. The muckrakers wrote hundreds of letters to one another, kept journals, and wrote their memoirs. The letters of Captain Archie Butt, who served as a personal aide to both Roosevelt and Taft, provide an intimate view of both men.

The Bully Pulpit, like Goodwin’s brilliant chronicles of the Civil War and World War II, exquisitely demonstrates her distinctive ability to combine scholarly rigor with accessibility. It is a major work of history—an examination of leadership in a rare moment of activism and reform that brought the country closer to its founding ideals.

About the Author

Doris Kearns Goodwin was born in Brooklyn, New York on January 4, 1943. She received a bachelor of arts degree from Colby College in 1964 and a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University in 1968. She taught at Harvard University and worked as an assistant to President Lyndon Johnson during his last year in the White House. She has written numerous books including The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream, and Wait Till Next Year. She has received numerous awards including Pulitzer Prize in history, the Harold Washington Literary Award, and the Ambassador Book Award for No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II and the Lincoln Prize and the Book Prize for American History for Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln.

Editorial Reviews

“These fascinating times deserve a chronicler as wise and thorough as Goodwin. The Bully Pulpit is splendid reading.”
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