The Catcher in the Rye

by J.d. Salinger

Little, Brown And Company | January 30, 2001 | Trade Paperback

The Catcher in the Rye is rated 3.8495 out of 5 by 93.
Anyone who has read J.D. Salinger''s New Yorker stories ? particularly A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut, The Laughing Man, and For Esme ? With Love and Squalor, will not be surprised by the fact that his first novel is fully of children. The hero-narrator of THE CATCHER IN THE RYE is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children''s voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden''s voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 288 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.88 in

Published: January 30, 2001

Publisher: Little, Brown And Company

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0316769177

ISBN - 13: 9780316769174

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 13

save 27%

  • In stock online

$12.92  ea

Online Price

$17.00 List Price

or, Used from $5.04

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Check store inventory (prices may vary)

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Profoundly incredible! This book is a simple story but the symbolism takes it to a whole new level. I could deeply connect with Holden even though he was a tad introverted with sharing his thoughts. Definitely worth a re-read and many reads after that!
Date published: 2014-07-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Not a Phony This book was smart, insightful and moody. The main character talked a lot about everyone being fake. He constantly changed moods. From hating someones guts to practically proposing, the character never seized to surprise.
Date published: 2014-05-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Relatable Read I recently finished reading The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. As weird as it sounds, I decided to read this book because it was Charlie’s favourite book in The Perks of Being a Wallflower. This made me want to see if The Catcher in the Rye was really that good. After reading it, I can say that it is. At first, this novel reminded me of The Perks of Being a Wallflower in that it told the story of someone’s seemingly mundane life. For example, this person was just going to school instead of fighting mythical creatures as most novels today portray. Don’t get me wrong though, the story was interesting and captivated my attention throughout with a storyline that was always moving. I would recommend this novel to any teenager looking for a relatable story. Google states themes of this novel as “teenage angst and alienation” something that most teens have to deal with at one point or another. This novel helps teens know that they are not alone and know that other people are going through the same thing.
Date published: 2013-12-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing This book is one of my absolute favorites. It is interesting and compelling and overall a great read.
Date published: 2013-06-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger This novel is written from a character’s mind that at times can be very difficult to understand, especially with Holden’s capability to always get lost in his thoughts. The style of writing lets you get lost in the never ending, subject changing abyss of Holden’s mind and emotions. I have read other reviews, and listened to comments on Catcher in the Rye and people say it’s a book that you either love or hate. I didn’t really love it or hate it honestly. Holden is unpredictable and doesn’t make too much sense most of the time, and there isn’t really a point to the story that I could find. That isn’t to say that there isn’t poetry throughout the story. According to me, Holden is just a depressed guy that wanders around trying to weed through his sadness. He is also a very hypocritical character which I found entertaining seeing as he does the very same things that he hates about other characters in the novel. To be honest, I don’t really know how to feel about this one, as well as I don’t understand how you could study this book in school. Then again, there is lots for a reader to interpret any which way you want. I think I’ll give Salinger a good 3 OUT OF 5 on this one. I enjoyed it but it’s not one of my favourites. Still, Catcher in the Rye is a classic, I think everybody should read it if they have a chance its not a heavy read. Check out my original book review blog for more titles and books, http://insubstanial.blogspot.ca/
Date published: 2013-05-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Mixed feelings The Catcher in the Rye is definitely one of those books that you either love or hate. While reading, I found myself constantly waiting for a twist that would turn this book around and end it on a high note, but nothing came. I felt as if Holden's narrative was either relatable or extremely confusing and unclear, there was no balance or happy medium. After researching a bit about the book some of its main themes became more clear, and some of the quotes are interesting and inspiring. This is a novel that can either confuse or uplift you.
Date published: 2012-08-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best School Book Ever! I had to read this book for my independent study in English last year and I found it to be more relatable then the other books our schools suggest/ force us into reading. I got to choose what book I wanted to read and I chose this book due to the hype & my curiousity surrounding the blank covers. I found that the book has a overhype surrounding it but still a very good read. I would love to read it again in the near future.
Date published: 2011-08-24
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Eight Bookcases Check out my review of Salinger's book on my blog at: http://8bookcases.blogspot.com/2011/08/catcher-in-rye-by-jd-salinger.html
Date published: 2011-08-19
Rated 1 out of 5 by from A real let down. This book undoubtedly had plenty of hype over the past couple decades, which is why I thought I was sinking my teeth into a very interesting read. This book is taught in schools across the world because for some reason people think that teenagers will be able to relate to themes of the book (which include teen angst, rebellion, confusion, and search for identity) and will be drawn to reading. I think this book would do the opposite and turn teenagers OFF reading! I did not like it at all! I was actually extremely frustrated with the main character and the entire book in general, even though I am a male teenager myself. I don’t think this book represented “teen confusion”, but mere stupid immaturity experienced by a spoiled teenager with too much time on his hands. Firstly, I would say that this book is devoid of an actual plot as literally nothing happens in the entire novel. It’s 280 pages of non-stop mindless droning. The only reason I kept reading was because I thought it would pick up at the end, but it doesn’t. There was about one or two quotes that I liked but beyond that, it was incredibly boring and just not the book for me. I know a couple of people that adore this book though, so it honestly depends on your taste. The style of writing was a little interesting (very subjective first person), but it was overshadowed by the bad things in the book. The main character was frustrating, the plot was mind numbing, and it didn’t hit on any interesting ideas or controversial topics whatsoever. It was an incredible bore. I hope you can see this book in a different light that I did!
Date published: 2011-07-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Why hate Holden? So many people absolutely hate Holden Caulfield, and I don't really understand it. To me, he is a lost and confused teenager, and I felt more bad for him than anything because he really didn't seem to know what he was doing and was just looking for some sort of answers in the people around him, but wasn't receiving them.
Date published: 2011-02-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Classic for a reason. I love Holden, I find the more I read the book, the more I empathize and wish to embrace him adoringly. He is just so sad, so lost. Wonderful book, in my opinion. If you couldn't find the story, you're not looking in right places. You're not feeling his character, I guess. I found that the plot was a pivotal movement in what I thought a story could be. Lovely book.
Date published: 2010-10-19
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Can't believe this is referred to as a "classic" I've noticed, reading other reviews, that 50% of people LOVED IT and 50% DID NOT LOVE IT.... and I'm one that didn't. I thought there was absolutely no plot... I felt like I was reading some drunk's attempt at a short story for college. I was disappointed in this book. I wish I had something good to say but I felt this to be a waste of time. Sorry.
Date published: 2010-08-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A.M.A.Z.I.N.G. This book is BRILLIANT! I’ve never encountered this style of writing before and it took me by surprise! I couldn’t stop giggling all throughout the book because the writing style was refreshing and funny although the subject matter that it tackled was not funny at all. This book talks about a 17 year boy who is having trouble adapting to life and mostly to his brothers death and thus keeps getting kicked out from school after school. All throughout the book he questions life and the purpose of it all. The book starts by him getting kicked out of school again and it follows him for the next three days where he leaves school early and instead of going home wanders New York City. The readers see what’s going through this teenage boys mind ; how he hates everything because it all seems “phony” to him. His college friends are “phony” , his teachers are “phony” , his girlfriend is “phony”, life is “phony”. The only person he really likes who he thinks is real is his 10 year old sister who just “kills him” and his dead brother who he considers as his favorite person ever. I hardly ever get inspired to read aloud to someone but this book made me read many paragraphs to my husband, it makes you want to quote it all the time. I honestly could quote it forever. And the phrases the author uses in the book are cool. I feel like I want to say “it kills me” or “ I am not kidding” or “ I am serious” or ” if you want to know the truth” at the end of every sentence because the main character says these phrases all the time. This book kills me! I really felt as if a 17 year kid was talking all throughout the book. The confused thoughts, hating people one second and wanting to marry them the next, the crazy hormones all teenagers suffer from, the uncertainty of life and what he wants out of life.The angst and alienation that comes with being a teenager. No wonder “The novel was included on a 2005 Time Magazine list of the 100 best English-language novels written since 1923,[8] and it was named by Modern Library and its readers as one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century“ This book is brilliant and it is a classic because even 59 years after it’s inception it still manages to be fresh and current. Love it. Give it the 2 thumbs up and I would love to read it again!
Date published: 2010-04-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Catch The death of J. D. Salinger is sure to evoke a familiar reaction in mainstream readers. These readers have read Catcher, forgotten it, and chosen to read it again in light of the death of its author. Or, the book has been recommended and ignored, but everyone else is reading it (in light of the author's death) which is reason enough to break your abstinence. And why not? Oprah hasn't recommended a book in ages and you need something to read. Phonies! Are you reading the book because it is a timeless classic? Or, are you reading the book because the author died, because everyone else is, because you want to follow the crowd? Hypocrites! Do you think this is what the author wants? "Sure, people are reading his books..." Wrong! People are reading for the wrong reason. The message is lost on the blind! "Sure, people are buying his book..." Wrong! Money is worthless to the dead! Is Salinger dead? NO! He is alive in these pages, and the pages of every published work. This isn't his only story, but it is the most obvious. Do you want to be obvious? Buy this book, you Fake!
Date published: 2010-01-31
Rated 1 out of 5 by from The Catcher In The Rye DO NOT read this book. it was the worst book i've ever read. it took me four month to finish it. And i've finished books in two hours. Boring and pointless. Don't read.
Date published: 2009-12-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Classic! I read this book in English class years ago and I'll admit the first time I read through it I didn't really think much of it. But - because I had to write a paper on Holden's nature and the symbolism the author uses to further describe Holden and his state of mind, I re-read it and it really is an amazing story about perception and Holden's unwillingness to mentality and emotionally mature into an adult. Some people argue that the plot is boring or whatnot but in all fairness the story in it's self is about Holden and the way he views the world. It's not for everyone but to each their own.
Date published: 2009-09-14
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Didn't live up to expectations In all honesty, i didn't think much of this book. I could sometimes relate to the main character, but most often i found him unrealiable and unconsistent.
Date published: 2009-07-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Read First time reading this classic and couldn't put it down at times. Slow to get into for the first few chapters or so, but well worth the wait. Story about a young man who's coming to the climax of an emotional breakdown, and reminds oneself of past troubles at times. Must read for any fan of classic literature.. :)
Date published: 2009-06-12
Rated 2 out of 5 by from The Catcher in the Rye The book was alright, but I found it a bit boring at times. A male gets kicked out of school and lives in hotels to avoid telling his parents the truth. The ending, I found, did not have a very good conclusion. Even though this book is a "classic", I found there was a lack of events within the plot.
Date published: 2009-03-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Catcher in The Rye This book is quite good. I would recommend it towards the teen and Young adult section. I wouldn't recommend this towards a younger crowd mostly because of the language used in most pages.
Date published: 2009-01-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A classic. The book is truly a classic tale, where the reader will be able to relate with the main character, Holden Caulfield. I found this book to have little to no plot, but the character development of the main character made this book much more enjoyable. Without the relation to the character, I wouldn't recommend this book. It's one of those "You hate it, or you love it" kind-of books.
Date published: 2008-12-31
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Catcher in the Rye “The Catcher in the Rye” by J.D. Salinger is written in first person. Holden Caulfield tells the story of his expulsion from Pencey, a college preparatory school and of his experiences in New York City while he is missing in action. It is evident from the beginning of the book that Holden is about to crash and burn. Holden looks at everything as being phoney and has a negative outlook of his friends and teachers, but he does have a soft spot for his younger sister Phoebe, for a friend named Jane and for his family. Phoebe, Holden’s younger sister has a power over Holden, and she is able to understand him in ways others are not; I love it when Phoebe tells Holden to stop swearing (I often felt like telling him myself). Holden’s main reason for finally seeking the help he needs is Phoebe, though younger she is more mature than Holden in a number of areas and she rescues him from himself. By the end of the book, Holden is in a psychiatric hospital, which is a relief because it was painful to read about him falling apart and no one was smart enough to get him the help he needed. As much as I loathed Holden and his foul mouth and his hypocrisy, everything he hated in others was mirrored by his own actions and he was blind to it, I found I liked him and I wanted him to make things work out in the end. Kids unfortunately grow up and face situations that can no longer be blocked out by adults and the kids either survive them (some scarred) or they do not survive. Holden in the end does survive, but is scarred and his attitude seems little changed, but he is still breathing and I guess that is something.
Date published: 2008-12-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from must read I've been wanting to read this book for years. I loved it. You can't help but commiserate with Holden Caulfield and relate to him. He's so tangible and contemporary. Hard to believe this was written over fifty years ago but it is easy to imagine the controversy it caused over the years. JD Salinger is quite the avant-guardist. I recommend it to everyone.
Date published: 2008-11-23
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Completely dry... no plot I started out reading this book with high expectation and was tremendously let down. This book came highly recommended from an English teacher at my school and my friend who hates reading and loved it. I was extremely let down beyond all belief! This story really had no plot but was really only about the wanderings of a teenaged boy after his expulsion from a prep school and how much he hates to see changes everywhere he goes. I don't recommend this book. The only good thing about the book is the end... where you are finally done reading it and can actually move onto something interesting! I love reading but was always putting it off because I really hated this book which I was reading... it took me three weeks to read this! That is ridiculous!
Date published: 2008-10-08
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Nothing special I can see why at the time it was published that it was something special. It has good characterization; it is very well written and has an interesting style. The story on the other hand is offensive in places and very pedestrian. If it weren't for the writing style and fame I would not have finished it. By todays standards it is almost a childrens book though. Especially when you take into account the desensitization by todays media.
Date published: 2008-07-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Definitely a great read anytime I picked up this book a couple years ago, red a few chapters then put it back on my bookshelf. Last week, i took it out and started reading it again. I absolutely love it! Its a great story about the struggles of an academically challenged kid scared what his parents would think if they would have found that he got kicked out of school for the second time. The author does drag on situations but they do end up aiding in the development of Holden's character. I was in high school when I first picked it up. I put it back on the shelf because it was written years ago and I wanted tor read new books. Big mistake there. This is a timeless classic that people will relate to generations into the future. Many of us can say that we have come across characters like Ackley and Stradlater, and I don't think that will ever change. PICK IT UP AND READ IT!!!
Date published: 2008-06-17
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good Book I've recently red this classic, it is a story about a sixteen year old young man who is kicked out of school. To avoid letting his parents know, he must stay away from home for a few days, so he decides to spend his time in New York City. This book follows the time that this young man spends away from home. I thought this book was good. The story line was interesting and quite humorous, although I thought the plot could have been a bit more exciting. None the less, I enjoyed reading this book, and I recomend it to anyone wanting to read a thought provoking novel.
Date published: 2008-06-12
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Painful... i'm not gonna lie (lol) Based on the reviews I've read... I'm now so confused! What did I miss? lol. ;) This just isn't my kind of book I guess... I really had a hard time getting through it. I actually remember feeling this exhilarating, wonderful feeling of accomplishment when it was done, like... "Yes!! I just conquered the most boring book of all time!!" lol. (I'm going to be crucified for this review... i can feel it... lol.) Truly though? Salinger obviously had something going considering the strong fan base for this book, I truly feel that I simply must have missed the point or something. lol
Date published: 2008-05-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Huh? Read this book for a book club and thought the book was okay. While the book had its moments and there were times I enjoyed it, I generally thought that the book was rather simplistic and the language was rather outdated, but the biggest concern was that there really was no plot to the storyline other than Holden bumming around NYC after being expelled from school. Best moment was the first scene with his sister.
Date published: 2008-03-16
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Alright... For all the hype there is about this book, I was extremely disappointed. Because there is so much talk surrounding the Catcher in the Rye, I thought I should give it a go. I found the main character extremely irritating and unrealistic. The plot line goes nowhere, and the writing in general was not at all what I was expecting.
Date published: 2008-02-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Must read more than once! I picked this book up last month, and frankly, after my first reading, I was thinking this book was vastly overrated. Holden had such a dim view of the world that it was depressing to read. I read it a second time, with a different mindset, and could begin to actually feel some sympathy (pity?) for him. I wouldn't call this an "enjoyable" read, but it is a classic!
Date published: 2008-02-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great book There's not much to be said that hasn't already been said about this book. The only thing I can add is that it is one of the best works of literature written. Equal parts alienating and frustrating, but entirely human, a must read.
Date published: 2008-02-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An absolute favourite By far one of the most memorable novels I have read. A moving story that is so real and so grounded in this world that one has no problem recognizing bits of own experiences in Salinger's narrative.
Date published: 2008-01-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Not for Everyone There seem to be many that would disagree, but this book is a classic and is worth every penny. Salinger perfectly depicts a teenager that is not content with the world and finds solace in no one and in nothing. Haulden is trying to cope with difficult events which anyone would struggle to deal with. Personally, I believe that the pessimism that is so strongly brought forth in the novel makes it all the more appealing. The sorrow and anger which he feels is so strong that it is easily felt by the reader. It also makes you see the world in a different light; not everything is sunshine and roses and Salinger does not try to hide this fact, If anything, he repeatedly throws it out into the open.
Date published: 2007-12-09
Rated 1 out of 5 by from A teenager's sob story chalk full of complaints First off, I thought this book was absolutely horrible. I was forced to read it for my English class and hated every agonizing moment spent reading it. Don't get me wrong. I love reading and I believe that I enjoy a wide range of genres, but this was basically a sob story from a pessimistic teenager with such a narrow opinion of the world and the people around him. Why read something that overflows with negativity? I personally, don't like the idea of having the authors 'negativity' influence my thoughts (which it did, throughout the whole story I felt bitter and was in a constant bad mood). Holden, more or less, hates everything around him, yet refuses to do anything to change his situation. He gives up too easily and has zero drive and determination. All he ever does is complain. I am left to wonder why so many people enjoy this novel, and I know quite a few people who do enjoy it, though I do not understand the reasoning behind this, nor do I think I ever will.
Date published: 2007-07-06
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Worst book ever Personally I hated this book, and I think it was bad enough to use the word hate. I've always loved reading for as long as i can remember, and I've always found something in books that I like, and while I found a thing I liked, in this case that was only the end. That wasn't because it had a good ending either because it didn't, it just drops, it was because I didn't have to read it any more. I find his pessimistic views to be boring and enough to make me want to burn the book every chance I got, however I still had to read it for school so I didn't but I personally thought it was the biggest waste of time I had ever experienced from reading a book.
Date published: 2007-06-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The one that started it all This is the only book I read in high school and it has spawned a love of reading that is putting me in the poor house!!
Date published: 2006-08-01
Rated 3 out of 5 by from a book that'll stay with me for awhile I read this book for AP english in the summer. I hated the book. I didn't like the character of Holden because he hated everything and everyone around him. I found it depressing. After reading it again I understood where Holden was coming from and why he thought the way he did. I actually related to the character a bit. I'm glad I read it the second time because I'll never forget the pessimistic, bold voice of Holden.
Date published: 2006-07-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent! Salinger did a great job in writing The Catcher in the Rye. I really liked reading this. After a 16 year old Holden gets expelled from school he spends a couple of days living on his own to try to sort out his problems. He meets many strange people and learns some valuable lessons. Salinger does a great job portraying a 16 year old boy. This is a great book to read.
Date published: 2006-06-23
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not the classic novel I thought it was We've always been told this novel is a classic. Although the book is worth reading, I would never compare it to such classics as "To Kill a Mockingbird" or "A Tale of Two Cities". The book really doesn't go anywhere. I don't particularly care for the style of writing. The book was written like a low budget movie from the 70's. I find even that character development which is the main focus of the novel, is lacking. Only in the last few chapters (of 26) does the character begin to mature. The rest is senseless roaming.
Date published: 2006-06-16
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Doesn't Stand Up To The Hype I had bought this book along with a couple other books and set it aside so I could "save the best for last". As it turns out, I should have read it first. Perhaps when it first came out it was different, but these days when I read a book about a teenager who spends half his day cursing out loud to himself, and the other half of the day walking around, I have trouble staying interested. The only reason I couldn't stop turning the pages was because I wanted to get it over with so I could start something else. If you were like me and thought you had to read this book because it's a "classic", then don't bother. It's not worth your time.
Date published: 2006-06-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Poignant Character Study After hearing this book was a classic, I decided to buy and read it. Although it is an excellent character study, its actual plot (while it may have been shocking at the time) has lost much of its shock value/controversy, having been surpassed by several other novels in its "teen rebellion." While being a teen myself when I read it, I still found that what many people respected about the book (the relation of Holden's anger to that of teens), was the thing that was the most intriguing, because, what draws you to Holden's character eventually begins to repel you, in a way which makes you realize what a troubled individual he is. Eventually, as a reader, you become certain that it is impossible to totally relate to his paranoid outlook of the world. Although contemporary books are often great as well, I do, however, recommend that people read this novel, as it is a striking character study which explores the undertones of society, and the human condition in its many troubled forms.
Date published: 2006-06-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Review of The Catcher in the Rye This book is wonderful. It sort of draws you into itself...I couldn`t stop reading it until it was over! The story tells of the life of a teenage boy . It takes you with him through the ups and downs of life. Every kid should read this book. It is readable for anyone above 8 years or so...
Date published: 2005-12-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing I read this book in highschool and havent been able to put it down since. Ive read it probably about 20 times and every time i catch something new i didnt notice before. Holden is hands down one of the best characters ever written. Obviously the bad reviewers just dont get the genius of Salinger and his writings. Definetly a book everyone must read at least once in their lifetime!
Date published: 2005-12-17
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Catcher in the Rye I finally got around to reading this book after all the hype I heard and I must say I was a bit disappointed. Holden complained throughout the book and the story just did not appeal to me. I think I would have enjoyed it better if I read while I was in my teens; I was more bitter back then and would have related more to the main character.
Date published: 2005-08-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent Salinger creates a character in this book that will not likely ever be forgotten. Holden Caulfield is so well developed that he alone is worth reading the book for. Great characterization. As a teenager, I particularily enjoyed this book and would recommend it to any teen. It's quite the coming of age tale, truly a classic.
Date published: 2005-08-05
Rated 2 out of 5 by from it's okay I think this is an okay book.I'm 15 years old and I don't think most kids my age will enjoy the book. most might find it little outdated. I like some parts of the book but adults seem to enjoy the book more.
Date published: 2005-08-01
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Catcher in the Rye This book went nowhere and I did not enjoy it at all.
Date published: 2005-04-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from thoughtful Alive with the music of psychedelic living. This book emphasizes the importance of being alone. Not exactly clean living, but that should be addressed more often. One can only but think the thoughts and ideas that are ubiquitous in this book. Amazing... funny to laugh.
Date published: 2005-03-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Something in my eyes ... At 16 most of us have a very skewed vision of life and our direction, in saying this you would only hope that J.D. himself was 16 when he penned this literary work. Continuity, plot and character development are almost non-descript and to mention that we learn who Holden Caufield was or where he was going was to admit he himself did which in 214 pgs. is the point that never makes it. I will say that a book with all that surrounds it is not what I expected out of Catcher in the Rye however whatever non-purpose it was written, I read it like millions alike, which proves old J.D. did something right. As for referring it to a friend ... Don't ever tell anybody anything ... If you do you at least rob them of their own interpretation, unless their 16.
Date published: 2005-02-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing. The Catcher in the Rye is an amazing book. It provokes an extraordinary outlook on society itself as well as it's attitude to the human condition. When reading you has to look beyond the text and extract the real purpose of the book. As a 16 year old, I recommend this book to everyone especially to teenagers. But an advanced warning, since it is a fascinating and enlightening description of our human condition, it can be an uncomfortable read.
Date published: 2004-06-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Worth the read. I've seen mixed reviews for this book, but finally decided to read it. I'm not surprised to see that some people hate it, but it's one of those unique books that readers just have to appreciate for what it is. The narrator, Holden is very cynical and has a very negative attitude, but if you think about it, many teenagers are just like him. It's an easy read, just pick it up and give it a chance. It's one of those coming of age books where he matures and gains direction in life, it's not pointless, it does lead somewhere, eventually. I thought it was well worth my time, I quite liked it overall.
Date published: 2004-03-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from excellent book I loved this book! I could relate so much to Holden in his ups and downs through his teen age years
Date published: 2003-11-16
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Depressing and Stupid This book was a waste of my time. The guy's always looking on the negatives. Everyone's a phony, he just depressing and at like a know it all. Who the heck wants to read that ??
Date published: 2003-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Through The Eyes of a 15 Year Old Reading the first page of this book, I did not know what to expect. Another book for English class. I thought, but then, I read on and saw that this was more than a book, it was the thing people my age saw and felt each and every day summed up on paper for the lucky reader who was to come by it. I learned alot from this book. I recomend it to anyone who feels alone in the world. You aren't the only one.
Date published: 2003-04-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Genius A friend of mine recommended it, and even lended it to me about a year ago. I started reading it one day at school during lunch hour, and I found myself hiding the book under my desk on my lap to read it through classes. I was instantly drawn to it. It was almost mesmerising. Now, a year later, I'm buying it for friends as christmas gifts. I love it so much, I'm reading it over and over. I'd definitely recommend it for other highschool students. If the book meant that much to me during the tough phase in my life that I read it in, it's sure to mean as much to others. Salinger's a genius.
Date published: 2002-11-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Catcher in the Rye This book was amazing! It was an easy reading and as you progress through the book, you feel as if Holden is a real person whose company you enjoy. The ending was neat because there was such a deeper level of meaning, but I was a bit disappointed that that was the end of it. It is cool how Holden wants to be the catcher in the rye and catch all the children before they fall of the cliff... and then at the end, he says that there isn't anything you can do to stop the children from falling off the carousel... you can see that he is growing up and i think he will be OK eventually. It was a great book! It really encourages me to do a lot more reading!
Date published: 2002-07-21
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Is it just me? Is it just me? Or is the book lacking of something? I can't somehow relate to the back. What is the book really telling us? Okay, about growing up.. but where's the conflict?
Date published: 2002-06-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read for anyone over the age of 16 Its is a must read for teenagers who have ever felt alone. The book is one you read one chapter and sit back and just think about it. It is very scary how you can put your self into Hogens place. Once you have readed it you well want to read it again and again!!
Date published: 2002-04-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Catcher in the Rye J.D. Salinger the author of Franny and Zooey, has created yet another mind-boggling maneuvre. The Catcher in the Rye is a late 40's book set in New York City, while young Holden Caulfield sets out to find himself in the midst of downtown craziness in the Big Apple. With a few surprising twists, this book remains unforgettable. Although there are numerous appropriate scenes, this would not be a bedtime story to read to your kids! This book is filled with profain language, prostitues and 'flitty' teachers, and would not be suitable for children under 13 years of age. While this book is inappropriate, it's a real CATCHER OF THE EYE!
Date published: 2002-01-16
Rated 1 out of 5 by from The catcher is a phony I had always heard what a great book this was so I was excited to read. While i was reading it i was always waiting for something to happen, some kind of revelation. What a let down. nothing happen
Date published: 2001-10-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Catcher in the Rye This was an excellent book. I read it in High school and have never forgotten it.
Date published: 2001-03-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from He's Come Undone Reading Catcher in the Rye is like watching your favourite nephew disintigrate before your eyes and being powerless to stop the locomotion. Holden Caulfield is an extremely bright 17 year old boy who is about to be expelled from yet another prestigious boys school because of poor grades and an even poorer attitude. Despite his searing observations he is deeply compassionate. He's a seriously damaged young man, devasted over the death of his younger brother who died a few years earlier of leukemia. Unable to come to terms with the death of the brother he loved, Holden is doomed to continue his downward spiral. He is extremeoly loyal and has a deep sense of family. He loves both his younger sister and his older brother passionately. Ultimately, the threads that are holding Holden together unravel quickly and devastatingly. He spends three days alone in New York trying to figure out what to do next -- each episode loosening the threads until he is completely undone. Revisiting this classic is a moving journey,
Date published: 2001-03-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An excellent read for those in need of a friend Catcher In The Rye is a well written book that can bring you a friend if you need one, and ear if you can't hear, and a voice for those who cannot seem to find the words to speak up. It can give you a sense of secruity in a world that is topsy turny and hectic. A great read for eveyone
Date published: 2001-03-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Layered rewards This story is quite provocative with a character development that can be seen on several levels. It suffers slightly in plot - but only to drive home a lasting impression of the main character. It is an easy read and it is rewarding, leaving you with an interesting outlook afterwards.
Date published: 2001-01-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Salinger hits the spot I know a number of students aging from 15-18 that will go through their highschool careers and never read a book, however for some reason that all changes when they pick up the book "The Catcher in the Rye". I am one of these students, I picked up a copy of this novel and have yet to put it down. I can not believe how deep this book goes. Holden reminds me of me, a boy in search of Salvation. He walks through life waiting for that fall... I finished this book only wanting to read it again, I wrote then wrote an essay on how Holden is in search of salvation and recieved 84% (my best mark yet). Directly after reading Salingers novel I went out and bought it, I am currently in the middle of it for the third time. If you want a book that you can really connect to then "The Catcher in the Rye" stands out like no other.
Date published: 2001-01-17
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Horrible book! I read War and Peace in one week, but it took me over a month to finish A Catcher in the Rye. I could not read more than two chapters at a time because I found the story incredibly boring, and every time I put it down I did not want to pick it up again. It took tremendous perseverance to finish it.
Date published: 2001-01-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from WOW!!! This book was truly amazing!!!I loved everything about it.For some reason,it doesn't really make any sense and you don't really know where Holden(the main caracter)is going but this book is fabulous!!!you can really understand Holden and feel what he feels and feel for him.That book made me laugh and cry.It was marvelous!At one point,when you really get to know Holden,you almost fall in love with him...I know i did!He's just so real!Anyway,great book!!!Read it...You owe it to yourself!!!
Date published: 2000-12-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Was there a Plot? Sure the book was good, it had its moments, but seriously what was is about? I read the book looked at it and said huh. The story went nowhere.
Date published: 2000-12-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An incredible, deep book. Catcher in the Rye is far deeper than simply a tory of a confused teenager in New York. Salinger does an incredible job of adressing the issue of the power struggle between individuality, and the control of a system. It looks into the battle between image and reality, and ends with a teenager sitting in a psychiatric hospital, gone insane from the illusion he thought was reality. With that end, the reader is left, aside from Holden, as the only true character. Incredible.
Date published: 2000-12-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A catcher of my heart This poignantly told story got right to the core of my heart. We all are so impatient to grow older, but when we do we want what we have lost. This story is one of, if not the best books I have ever read. Something really got to me. The plot gets under your skin and buries itself deep within your soul. We all feel lonely, and this story knows it.
Date published: 2000-11-26
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Aging badly I fear that Catcher in the Rye is rather like socialism: it looks great when you're 18, but wears pretty thin after your voice breaks.
Date published: 2000-10-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Obviously!! Common guys, must anything even be said. The best book ever written! Holden is such a full character. You better run out now and buy this book.
Date published: 2000-09-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Special This book talks to me in a way few others do. I find, when even looking at this title, that I am eager for something I don't think I can get, like a hunger just a little out of reach, the shore a little too far off. One of the sweetest books I have ever read. I carry it around with me forever.
Date published: 2000-09-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Catcher in the Rye This book is great! It doesn't have all the action and excitment that I usually like, but THIS damn book I couldn't put down! That's because the protagonist, Holden Caulfield, is so much like other teens. I know because I am a teen. I think of him as a real person, sometimes. It's weird, sometimes I even TALK like him! I know, I'm CRAZY too!!
Date published: 2000-08-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Astounding book After I read this book, I thought for a moment... I thought that, how can this book be so good, and have so much character when the main character is such a bore that scapegoats everyone... This is a great book, and it should be in your home right now, so go to your local Chapters retailer, and purchase it as soon as possible..
Date published: 2000-07-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hark to the tale of Holden. Yes, that's right. Five out of five. No one has ever written a book so well about a teenager. Despite the fact that Holden Caulfield may be looked on by some as a loser, he depicts a sentiment that is common to most adolescents. So, I guess the praise here would be not for how well J.D Salinger wrote 'The Catcher In The Rye' when concerning language etc, but how well he put down most of our feelings as teenagers so well. That is all.
Date published: 2000-07-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Catcher in the Rye Holden Caulfield prepares to leave his moronic life behind and sets out to do it his way. He's just not sure which way to go. A stunning tale about life and the choices we make to get us through.
Date published: 2000-06-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Art in Controversy Amidst all the controversy surrounding this novel, Holden Caulfield has emerged as the one realistic assertion of 20th century displacement. Adolescence has become an overlooked stage of life, but Salinger has captured the difficulties in a symbolic movement of the everyday. Holden's insecurities prove that not all is what it seems, and give a little bit of reassurance to those who think less of themselves. I think that every high school level student should read this. It is as enjoyable as it is remarkably real. A breathtaking work of art.
Date published: 2000-03-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from You haven't LIVED until you've read this book.... Need I say more?
Date published: 2000-02-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I understand the value of the novel It is a good book, but I don't think it's AS good as everyone else says it is. I thought it dragged on alittle too much and Holden annoyed me sonetimes. The ending didn't give me enough closure and I guess I was expecting the novel to have a shocking ending. I do agree however that the author did capture a good perspective of the mind of a young teenage boy who goes through depression and practically homelessness. I understood the questions he had and the confusion of going through adolesence, and I almost felt sorry for him.
Date published: 2000-02-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Book I also have read this book in grade 11, and I also believe that this book was well writen. I have resently read it again after about 3 years and enjoyed it as I did in grade 11. If you have not read this book I erge you to find it and read it for your self.
Date published: 2000-01-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from EXCELLENT BOOK I read this book in grade 11 and loved it..it is now 4 years later and I still love it that I am reading it again.
Date published: 2000-01-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Classic for all Youth It is an amazing feat to be able to convey the same message of confusion and teenage angst to this day and age, considering that this book was published in 1950. All the youth should read this more that classic novel by one of America's greatest novelists.
Date published: 1999-12-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Classic! Its unbelieveable that they really banned this novel in th early years!. I think this novel should be read in every house by every youth.
Date published: 1999-12-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Perfect for People Like Me This book was like nothing else I have ever read in my life. It has changed my perspective in reading, and it shows how a teenager would feel if they were expelled from school. The book also describes what a boy like Holden, would probably do in a large city such as New York, while feeling depressed. The person who has probably affected Holden's choice in life, is not his teachers, but his kid sister, Phoebe. This book is truely worth reading, because it's simple, and it's a bit fun in a way. The way J.D. Salinger had portrayed Holden's point of view in life, made this book from a good book, to a great story.
Date published: 1999-12-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very good novel! This was an excellent novel potraying a teenagers life!
Date published: 1999-12-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best book I've ever read This book was recommended to me by a friend, and the second I started to read it, I couldn't put it down. I'd recommend this book to anyone! It's a great novel.
Date published: 1999-11-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An Outsatnding Book Probably the greatest piece of literature i have ever read. The amount of symbolism and characterization in this book is unbelieveable. J.D Salinger has interwoven everything all together and it is amazing once you read it again how much you missed the first time. Buy it, read it and then read it again. I have several times and it still amazes me.
Date published: 1999-11-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Definite Must Read It's not often that a book labelled "classic literature" captures and sustains my attention from the outset. This book did just that. I couldn't put it down. Salinger's ability to get inside the head of a teenage boy is amazing. I felt like I was a friend of Holden's. He is a witty and intelligent young man. His adventures are not mundane but they definitely feel real. Definitely make your kids read this one.
Date published: 1999-08-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Catcher in the rye What...you mean you havent read it. Fine, no one's perfect. The book, well its real. mundane real. lousy real. disturbing real. human real. Challenge yourself to accept what is offered. you will Love it or hate it, but then again thats the price of artwork
Date published: 1999-07-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Simply the best I don't think I'll ever come across a book that will move me and make me want to read it a thousand times as much as Salinger's classic piece, The Catcher In The Rye. Please read this book if you haven't already. And, if you have, read it again. And again. And again. Follow Holden (in whom we can see a little piece of every teenager we've ever known) on his 24 hour journey through the city, as he encounters new people, places, and things he never thought he'd ever see. Get inside his head and see how teenage life was like early in this century. Along with Go Ask Alice, it is the definitive statement on teenage life, and will forever live on as the greatest novel of all time.
Date published: 1999-07-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Do I Really Need To Tell You? This book really doesn't need my recommendation, but here it is anyway. This is the greatest literary work of the twentieth century. It changed the way a generation looked at themselves and in the future will be considered a historic document of adolescent life in the twentieth century. Order it. Read it, several times. Then make your kids read it. That is all.
Date published: 1999-05-31

– More About This Product –

The Catcher in the Rye

by J.d. Salinger

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 288 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.88 in

Published: January 30, 2001

Publisher: Little, Brown And Company

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0316769177

ISBN - 13: 9780316769174

From the Publisher

Anyone who has read J.D. Salinger''s New Yorker stories ? particularly A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut, The Laughing Man, and For Esme ? With Love and Squalor, will not be surprised by the fact that his first novel is fully of children. The hero-narrator of THE CATCHER IN THE RYE is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children''s voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden''s voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.

About the Author

More than 20 years of seclusion and silence have taken their toll on J. D. Salinger's literary reputation, but the impact made by The Catcher in The Rye (1951) and the Glass family stories was deep enough to make a lasting impression and to assure his continued readership. Salinger was born in New York City of Jewish and Scottish-Irish extraction. He attended Manhattan public schools, a military academy in Pennsylvania, and three colleges, but received no degrees. "A happy tourist's year in Europe," he wrote in 1955, "when I was eighteen and nineteen. In the Army from '42 to '46, most of the time with the Fourth Division. . . . I've been writing since I was fifteen or so. My short stories have appeared in a number of magazines over the last ten years, mostly---and most happily---in the New Yorker. I worked on "The "Catcher in the Rye,' on and off, for ten years" (Twentieth Century Authors). "Remarkable and absorb-ing . . . profoundly moving . . . magic," Harrison Smith called this story. The Catcher has been an extremely popular book among young people ever since its appearance and has brought Salinger an international reputation. Franny and Zooey (1961) is composed of two long New Yorker stories, which appeared in 1955 and 1957, recording a significant weekend in the lives of Franny Glass, a troubled 20-year-old college student, and her brother Zooey, a television actor. Raise High the Roof Beam, (1963) is another story of the Glass family. There are seven Glass children, "t
read more read less

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 13

Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart