The Catcher in the Rye

by J.d. Salinger

Little, Brown And Company | January 30, 2001 | Trade Paperback

3.8352 out of 5 rating. 91 Reviews
Anyone who has read J.D. Salinger''s New Yorker stories ? particularly A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut, The Laughing Man, and For Esme ? With Love and Squalor, will not be surprised by the fact that his first novel is fully of children. The hero-narrator of THE CATCHER IN THE RYE is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children''s voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden''s voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 288 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.79 in

Published: January 30, 2001

Publisher: Little, Brown And Company

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0316769177

ISBN - 13: 9780316769174

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 13

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– More About This Product –

The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye

by J.d. Salinger

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 288 Pages, 5.12 × 7.87 × 0.79 in

Published: January 30, 2001

Publisher: Little, Brown And Company

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0316769177

ISBN - 13: 9780316769174

From the Publisher

Anyone who has read J.D. Salinger''s New Yorker stories ? particularly A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut, The Laughing Man, and For Esme ? With Love and Squalor, will not be surprised by the fact that his first novel is fully of children. The hero-narrator of THE CATCHER IN THE RYE is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children''s voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden''s voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.

About the Author

More than 20 years of seclusion and silence have taken their toll on J. D. Salinger's literary reputation, but the impact made by The Catcher in The Rye (1951) and the Glass family stories was deep enough to make a lasting impression and to assure his continued readership. Salinger was born in New York City of Jewish and Scottish-Irish extraction. He attended Manhattan public schools, a military academy in Pennsylvania, and three colleges, but received no degrees. "A happy tourist's year in Europe," he wrote in 1955, "when I was eighteen and nineteen. In the Army from '42 to '46, most of the time with the Fourth Division. . . . I've been writing since I was fifteen or so. My short stories have appeared in a number of magazines over the last ten years, mostly---and most happily---in the New Yorker. I worked on "The "Catcher in the Rye,' on and off, for ten years" (Twentieth Century Authors). "Remarkable and absorb-ing . . . profoundly moving . . . magic," Harrison Smith called this story. The Catcher has been an extremely popular book among young people ever since its appearance and has brought Salinger an international reputation. Franny and Zooey (1961) is composed of two long New Yorker stories, which appeared in 1955 and 1957, recording a significant weekend in the lives of Franny Glass, a troubled 20-year-old college student, and her brother Zooey, a television actor. Raise High the Roof Beam, (1963) is another story of the Glass family. There are seven Glass children, "t
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Appropriate for ages: 13 - 13

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